Kerbal Space Program: Let's Light This Candle

There's a lot of talk about resources and processing in there and it sounds as if they are in and have been for a while, they're just iterating on them. Is that right? Do any parts or fuel have resource costs?

Edit: upon reading further, it looks like they are not already in, may be coming with the next release.

0.19 is out! There isn't a tonne of new stuff in here, but having proper rover parts is a definite step forward:

http://kerbaldevteam.tumblr.com/post...

I had to take a stab at a skycrane landing, but I couldn't be bothered flying to Duna last night, so I just shot for the Mun instead:

IMAGE(http://wootangent.net/~lsd/blah/crappy-skycrane.jpg)

It worked a treat, but it's definitely over-engineered -- with that much fuel left, I could've put that skycrane back in to orbit if I'd wanted to.

Maybe you can send him home when you're done.
IMAGE(http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/spirit.png)

I finally managed to accomplish an orbital docking (using the PebbleGarden Phoenix orbiter):

IMAGE(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g20/Kelly-Hrdina/KSP/firstdock.png)

Now it's time to fire up 0.19.

To save other people some time:

Q: If I’ve already bought the game on the KSPStore, can I switch over to Steam?
A: The answer to that is Yes, but not right now. We are going to set up a system on our store where you’ll be able to get a Steam key for KSP provided you already have purchased the game. However, we are still working on the exact details of this feature, so it’ll likely be a while until that’s set up. We’ll of course let you know when that becomes available.

OMG!

There's half a dozen games I want on that Early Access program. My weekend just got FULL and my wallet just got EMPTY.

Everyone should get this game, right now!

I guess they finally gave up on the patcher

I'm wondering if I should double dip rather then wait the untold length of time for a steam key.

I don't think the patcher is going away anytime soon... Might not be worth it to pay twice just to get it on Steam, when you'll get a key soon enough.

I am tempted to pay again on Steam, just because I bought it so long ago that I only paid $10 for it, and that $10 has bought me probably more hours of gameplay than any other game.

I spent some more time on a Duna rover, borrowing a few ideas from the sample rover and skycrane, but trying my best to make it look all neat and tidy. Here are a couple of action shots:

IMAGE(http://25.media.tumblr.com/fd90a969e7ef86ef44dd5c201f5b0eca/tumblr_mjwqietl9T1rmm5rbo5_1280.png)

IMAGE(http://25.media.tumblr.com/5ff7066ebec8478483d1d22f0750bce5/tumblr_mjwqietl9T1rmm5rbo9_1280.png)

Robear wrote:

I don't think the patcher is going away anytime soon... Might not be worth it to pay twice just to get it on Steam, when you'll get a key soon enough.

LiquidMantis wrote:

To save other people some time:

Q: If I’ve already bought the game on the KSPStore, can I switch over to Steam?
A: The answer to that is Yes, but not right now. We are going to set up a system on our store where you’ll be able to get a Steam key for KSP provided you already have purchased the game. However, we are still working on the exact details of this feature, so it’ll likely be a while until that’s set up. We’ll of course let you know when that becomes available.

Depends on how long it takes them.

If the patcher is still around, what does it matter how long it takes? Seriously.

Because I've never had the patcher work right? Because I have to dig up my password and log in every time there's a patch? Because ever time a major patch comes out their servers get slammed and you can't patch it for a few days anyway?

I need to see if this crashes less than the last version I installed. It would crash to desktop every time I went from (failed) launch back to the shipyard. Considering how slow the game is to launch, this made it more or less unplayable for me.

A picture of the inside of the new crew module.

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/YTamMMG.png)

I love the labels.

That looks awesome.

I'm currently so hung up on trying to build a space station (and getting through the nightmare of not having my maneuvering thrusters balanced properly) that I havent left Kerbal orbit yet. I really should do that. Do you guys find you can get just about anywhere in the system if you design a rocket that leaves 1 good stage at the end with a decent amount of fuel? I've been assuming I pretty much have to craft the rocket in space (thus my interest in mastering Docking)

Norfair wrote:

A picture of the inside of the new crew module.

I love the labels.

Specifically how the airlock is labeled "Space"

For maneuvering thrusters, I tend to place one set on the center of mass for the stage that will be moving around. It's been working pretty well so far.

Steam keys are now available.

Well, that was quicker then they made it out to be.

I was trying to build an interplanet (think Duna) rocket, and I kept having a problem with my orbit transfer stage. Put bluntly, it was bottom heavy (2 NERVAs mounted on the sides for the flight back), and I couldn't manage its orientation once it got into orbit. It just keep wanting to point exhaust nozzles to Kerbin. Any thoughts?

Do you have the auto-attitude thing engaged? (RCS, maybe? I haven't seriously played for a long while.)

Squeegee_Joe wrote:

I was trying to build an interplanet (think Duna) rocket, and I kept having a problem with my orbit transfer stage. Put bluntly, it was bottom heavy (2 NERVAs mounted on the sides for the flight back), and I couldn't manage its orientation once it got into orbit. It just keep wanting to point exhaust nozzles to Kerbin. Any thoughts?

Do you have trouble keeping orientation when the boosters are active, or just getting pointed the right way to start your burn? If your craft has any RCS thrusters (if not, why not?!), try enabling that when you're trying to get oriented for the burn. They can help mid-burn too. I've had some success augmenting normal maneuvers with that. If your engine has gimbal, you can turn on the lowest notch on the throttle and get some help that way, but it could mess with the maneuver you're trying to set up.

Another thought: remember that if you bring your spacecraft to a stop, so that it's not spinning on your screen, that means it's holding orientation, right? But it's also plummeting around the Earth at a couple of thousand miles an hour. So it's constantly going to be 'rotating' with regard to the Earth's surface, because the Earth is falling away from underneath it.

If it's 'rightside up' at apoapsis, it will be 'upside down' at periapsis, purely because it doesn't change orientation, and is now on the other side of the planet.

Also a neat trick with a drifty ship is to engage time warping just as the orientation faces the way you want. To simplify the time warp system, kerbal kills your ship's rotation.

Bit of a cheat but with a massive ship that never should have gotten off the ground in the first place...

Hey yours is manned! Poor guy is gonna be stuck out there a while.
I made my first ion probe last night too. I crashed it into the Mun

It had very low mass but I only put one engine on it, so it took something like 5 swings around Kerbin with full throttle at periapsis to boost it into Munar orbit. When I finally got there, my approach was so bad (only my second attempt at an encounter with another body in space) that I didn't have any chance of changing my momentum enough to avoid crashing... so I played it off like NASA did a few years ago.

Yep, lookin for water. Totally meant to do that!

polypusher wrote:

Hey yours is manned! Poor guy is gonna be stuck out there a while.
I made my first ion probe last night too. I crashed it into the Mun

It had very low mass but I only put one engine on it, so it took something like 5 swings around Kerbin with full throttle at periapsis to boost it into Munar orbit. When I finally got there, my approach was so bad (only my second attempt at an encounter with another body in space) that I didn't have any chance of changing my momentum enough to avoid crashing... so I played it off like NASA did a few years ago.

Yep, lookin for water. Totally meant to do that!

And what they're currently planning to do with a couple of other planetary probes. I think the current ones en route to Jupiter, Saturn and Pluto are all going to crash into their surfaces. Engineering! It's like Math, but louder.

Everytime I see this thread and the pictures I get an itch to play this, but then I think about the math, physics, math, trajectories, and the math that's involved with space flight and I slowly back away and then run. So, how much is really involved in learning this? Is this a "gamey" simulation that's fun and easy or do you need to read 300 pages about (googling space stuff) azimuths, velocities, pitch, air density, lift coefficients, and math. Can a dumb guy play this or should I just stick with shooting zombies in the face?

A dumb guy like me can do the first 3 tutorials and have the fundamental knowledge you need to keep going. The rest is experimentation and some youtube videos (Scott Manley is the f'in man)