Biking: Catch-all

Wait-- you wear your jersey over the bibs? So it's not like suspenders??

ianunderhill wrote:
Wired wrote:

In other news I picked up a pair of bibs from the LBS on Saturday and damn I could tell even in the 8 miles I managed to squeeze out, what a difference they made from my 12 dollar bike shorts from Sports Authority.

Are you mainly noticing the difference in the quality of construction leading to increased comfort (which is likely in the number of panels), or are you talking about bibs vs. shorts, or both? I always dissed bibs as an old man thing until I tried them, and I've never looked back since. Not having material shift or roll down your waist as you ride is definitely worth the initial strangeness of pulling straps up over your shoulders...and ultimately, nobody knows because your jersey's over top.

Yes

I am noticing the quality of the pads and construction, I went with the Assos bibs after trying on a few different brands in the shop they were not cheap but I am glad I found that the local price was not marked up terribly from online retailers.

Now even in my short ride, having bibs vs shorts was a big difference, not having to worry about them sagging/ catching on the saddle as I mounted and dismounted the bike was huge for me.

Wait, you wear a jersey with bibs? Not my bike team!

IMAGE(http://blog.bikeridr.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/onsie.jpg)

LiquidMantis wrote:

Wait, you wear a jersey with bibs? Not my bike team!

Never have I hated and loved anyone at the same time to the degree I do you right now LM

Serengeti wrote:

There's a lot of stuff I'll pick up from my LBS, but clothing isn't on that list as the shops here mark up their clothing prices to about double what Amazon charges. As much as I like to support the local guy, that's just too much.

Amazon etc. undercutting the little guy re:cycling apparel has seen no change in markup practices at the LBS because too many people treat the LBS as a showroom/try-on station for people shopping through Amazon. While the shops wait on more industry companies and wholesalers to adopt and enforce minimum pricing policies (which is getting bigger, thankfully), the only recourse the shops have is to provide superior service through product knowledge and suggestions, while non-customers continue to increase wear to floor stock.

ianunderhill wrote:
Serengeti wrote:

There's a lot of stuff I'll pick up from my LBS, but clothing isn't on that list as the shops here mark up their clothing prices to about double what Amazon charges. As much as I like to support the local guy, that's just too much.

Amazon etc. undercutting the little guy re:cycling apparel has seen no change in markup practices at the LBS because too many people treat the LBS as a showroom/try-on station for people shopping through Amazon. While the shops wait on more industry companies and wholesalers to adopt and enforce minimum pricing policies (which is getting bigger, thankfully), the only recourse the shops have is to provide superior service through product knowledge and suggestions, while non-customers continue to increase wear to floor stock.

I understand that and I'll certainly be happy to pay a premium at the LBS if it's warranted, but you misunderstand; my LBS charges significantly more for clothing that other LBS's, not just more than Amazon. That $35 pair of shorts on Amazon might be $45 at the LBS in another town, but it's $65 at my LBS, and that's just excessive.

Wired wrote:
LiquidMantis wrote:

Wait, you wear a jersey with bibs? Not my bike team!

Never have I hated and loved anyone at the same time to the degree I do you right now LM

IMAGE(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_olTuObtxAn8/TM5dzgC3xNI/AAAAAAAAAAQ/yhA4dbJjYh4/s1600/Oedipus+eyes.jpg)

Serengeti wrote:

I understand that and I'll certainly be happy to pay a premium at the LBS if it's warranted, but you misunderstand; my LBS charges significantly more for clothing that other LBS's, not just more than Amazon. That $35 pair of shorts on Amazon might be $45 at the LBS in another town, but it's $65 at my LBS, and that's just excessive.

Sorry, I wasn't criticizing your choice, I was simply stating that most LBSes haven't changed their markup practices in the post-Amazon world for the reasons mentioned. Some shops simply target (and have long been targeting) higher margins than others. This is sometimes because the shop believes they're offering superior knowledge/service at the sales level. Other times, it's because the owner's out of touch. In cases where you see what you perceive to be the latter behavior, I encourage you to send a frank email to the shop stating such, as otherwise, the only perception that the owner and/or buyer may have is "product X isn't selling this year".

I also wanted to mention minimum pricing practices, simply because this is becoming a big thing. Some of the industry is making a real effort to bolster the little guy, which is a good ten years overdue at least.

LiquidMantis wrote:

Wait, you wear a jersey with bibs? Not my bike team!

No "clippy" shoes? No heaps of shattered carbon fiber frames poisoning the earth? Just what kind of "BIKE NAZI!"-shouting irrationalist are you, LM?

On a side note, I am done with Strava.

I signed up for premium to see if what they were offering was worth a couple shillings a month. It isn't for me but no big deal it is under the threshold of money that my wife questions, and as a rule I never check out statements.

But I started getting emails from them every few days to upgrade my subscription to an annual pass. I asked a number of times to stop over the course of a week, Normally I would just add to spam list and move on. But they were sent from the same email that all their notifications are sent, and I enjoy seeing friends feeds etc in my inbox.

I said f*ck it and just canceled the monthly plan with a note as to why. I was then pestered for a few days with come back emails even got a few upgrade to the annual pass emails.

I had a discussion with some one there over email after 3 weeks of auto replies and just got them to remove me completely from their databases.

It is a shame, because I enjoyed some of the aspects but they hit me in my biggest pet peeve. And I will gladly cut off my nose to spite my f*cking stupid face.

Wired wrote:

...giving money over the internet...

You really should know better. Once you give the LochNesh Monstar three fiddy he always comes a'back for more!

PAR

Get My Tracks. I haven't used it, but friends swear by it, and it doesn't have that stupidly narcissistic King of the Section or whatever it is!

I've downloaded now that I have a phone that can utilize it, but I haven't been on a ride to really try it out yet.

Wired wrote:

On a side note, I am done with Strava.

I signed up for premium to see if what they were offering was worth a couple shillings a month. It isn't for me but no big deal it is under the threshold of money that my wife questions, and as a rule I never check out statements.

But I started getting emails from them every few days to upgrade my subscription to an annual pass. I asked a number of times to stop over the course of a week, Normally I would just add to spam list and move on. But they were sent from the same email that all their notifications are sent, and I enjoy seeing friends feeds etc in my inbox.

I said f*ck it and just canceled the monthly plan with a note as to why. I was then pestered for a few days with come back emails even got a few upgrade to the annual pass emails.

I had a discussion with some one there over email after 3 weeks of auto replies and just got them to remove me completely from their databases.

It is a shame, because I enjoyed some of the aspects but they hit me in my biggest pet peeve. And I will gladly cut off my nose to spite my f*cking stupid face.

I made three calls to Dwell magazine for the same reason. Totally out of whack ratio of utility:effort.

LBS (Reser Bicycle) started in the used market. I really dig this idea. I go to their new shop just north of downtown Cincinnati, just to look around. In minutes I find myself staring at a 54cm Soma ES with (at least some) Campagnola components used for $1,200. It's essentially on consignment for one of the LBS' techs. The owner says it's worth $4,000 and that the tech would take $900. We gave him a down-payment to hold it so we can go back later.

Riding it, it's so much lighter than my old '80s steel frame. The components feel nicer, the wheels are nicer, but that's not necessarily a stretch. A new frame runs about $400 but beyond that there are components and even Shimano Sora aren't necessarily cheap. And wheels and tires. Beyond that even is the labor involved. I'm not sure about the $4,000 valuation, though this is a good shop and I feel good about the sale. Also, used bikes come with a year of free adjustments, which is a nice over-the-top gesture.

I've waited way too long getting a bike that fits, and this feels like a good leap to make, but I thought I'd post here in case there is some known issue about the Soma frames or whatever. It's largely irrational paranoia, but I figure a little checking can't hurt.

Thoughts?

Your paranoia is irrational: SOMA is tits.

What Campag parts is it running, and how old are they? Get it anyway, I'm just curious.

Seconding WipEout's remarks - do it.

Not sure on components at the moment, but I'm assured that this tech is a Campy nut.

I'm on my way momentarily. Pictures will follow.

Less than 3 days until Ragbrai. The largest, longest, oldest bike ride in the world. I can't wait! This will be my 11th year living in the US and my 9th Ragbrai. Early indications are that it may be the best Ragbrai ever!

If any other Goodjers are going, let me know and I'll pm you my contact info so we can meet up along the way.

Have fun Serengeti! Don't let your handlebars snap in the middle of a big decent!

PAR

My current road bike I bought used from a bike store and couldn't be happier with it. I believe one of the workers there owned it and sold it to the shop. It gets recognized every time I drop it off for service.

Alright. Front and rear derailleurs, crankset, and brifters are Campagnolo Record. Brifters are carbon. Brakes are stainless Shimano calipers. Rear wheel is Mavic; can't discern the front. Running 700x23c CST Comp tires.

IMAGE(http://www.flickr.com/photos/boxingjewels/7603108690/)

Reflections are confusing the iPhone camera, apparently, so it's a little blurry.

Edit: The [img] tag seems not to like Flickr links. Here is the bike.

Norfair wrote:

My current road bike I bought used from a bike store and couldn't be happier with it. I believe one of the workers there owned it and sold it to the shop. It gets recognized every time I drop it off for service.

What I like about this, and which is novel for me, is a credentialed source for used bikes. The guy I bought my older bike from had on the order of 50 in a garage, and purported to be a bike guy with a collection including several very expensive models. He operated primarily on Craigslist and subsequent to my purchase I noticed quite a bit of argument via Craigslist with other folks, primarily over accusations of selling stolen bikes. I've searched for him a couple of times, to get either a nicer older bike that fit me or maybe a couple of bikes to cannibalize. Never could.

With this LBS selling used, I get to talk to people I trust and try the bikes out. I also get a year of some minimal service, which isn't necessarily laborious but implies that the LBS spent time getting the bike up to snuff so as to stave off having to tune it every three weeks. I hope it's a good business for them, because it allows folks without a budget for quality new bikes to perhaps drop their big-box wheels for something better.

muraii wrote:

With this LBS selling used, I get to talk to people I trust and try the bikes out. I also get a year of some minimal service, which isn't necessarily laborious but implies that the LBS spent time getting the bike up to snuff so as to stave off having to tune it every three weeks. I hope it's a good business for them, because it allows folks without a budget for quality new bikes to perhaps drop their big-box wheels for something better.

Yeah, it's cool. I've spent a lot of time wishing there were some sort of used bike cert program to stop people getting screwed so easily via Craiglist, what with its garages and attics full of $200 "vintage, excellent condition" Schwinns with rusty drivetrains, destroyed bottom brackets and headsets, and battered 27" wheels. Sadly, such a program would be hard to manage. Your LBS is doing it right.

Hey, speaking of, that bike's a beauty. Congrats, man. How do you like the ride? Between the integrated brifters, the better frame material, and the fact that it actually fits you, it must be a knockout.

I just read about electronic shifters while drooling over high-end tri bikes.

Ride-by-wire? I'd never heard of this! Anyone had an direct or indirect experience with these? Fascinating.

Yeah-- Congrats Muraii, that is a great deal and a good looking bike

Jonman: When I left my old shop a few years ago, Shimano's Dura-Ace electronic get-up was brand new. It cost $700 for the front derailleur alone-- I never would have bought a bike with an electronic drivetrain, but now-- Shimano also has Ultegra Di2, Campagnolo have their own electronic drivetrain coming up as well-- it's a little more viable, although not really necessary for my purposes.

I got to ride a couple of Shimano's Dura-Ace bikes, and it was nice, to say the least. At the time, though, I heard the Tour de France riders were having calibration issues on the front derailleur that was throwing the chain over the outside chainring, but I'm sure, 3 years later, that issue has been resolved. The bikes I rode were WAAAAY too expensive to really put through the paces, though (I used to takea couple of the shop's high-end bikes out for "test rides" around the Paradise Loop in the Bay Area-- but not the Di2 equipped bikes; I was too afraid I'd break something uber-expensive).

Jonman wrote:

I just read about electronic shifters while drooling over high-end tri bikes.

Ride-by-wire? I'd never heard of this! Anyone had an direct or indirect experience with these? Fascinating.

I've set up and worked on first-gen Di2 Dura-Ace and Di2 Ultegra, down to and including a Di2 Dura-Ace group that was on a bike that got crashed hard on the drive side. I mention this because one of the first thoughts I have regarding any exposed, expensive componentry is, "How durable is it?" Here, the answer is "very" - to avoid burning out the solenoids in the rear derailleur, the unit senses a hard impact and decouples the more sensitive internals. You can re-couple it by entering a recovery mode by way of holding a button on the wiring harness.

Emergency situations aside, how does it perform? Great. Once everything's set up, you can shift under load flawlessly, even up front. I've taken Di2 equipped bikes for test rides and tried to throw the chain by shifting the front derailleur while sprinting hard, out of the saddle and everything - you can't do it. The front shifts are powerful and consistent because you're not moving a lever, you're pushing a button that sends an electrical signal; there's not really any room left for human error in the shift. Rear shifting is great, but not noticeably crisper than a properly-adjusted mechanical system - Shimano, Campy and SRAM all have great rear shifting in their top-three groupsets. The cool part, though, is that the processor in the front derailleur's body keeps track of the rear derailleur's position, and the front derailleur auto-trims accordingly. Properly tuned, you can cross chain til the cows come home and not have any rub. Since there are no mechanical cables, cable tension and stretch never enter into things: it's pretty set-and-forget.

There are a lot of options in terms of where you can shift. There are optional redundant "sprinter" and "climbing" switches you can mount at arbitrary points on your drop bars. Tri-cockpit options are there too: not only do you get to mount shifters on your aero extensions, but there are integrated shift/brake lever pods for the ends of your base bars as well. The aero extension bar shifters come in two options - one has buttons for upshifting and downshifting for the corresponding derailleur on each extension, but there's a TT-oriented option where, to cut weight down, they just put a single button on each for moving the rear derailleur, as time trialists don't tend to shift the front derailleur once they get going.

All the junctions between cables and components are waterproofed, and all the joins on the wiring harness get sealed off with heatshrink when you set it up. I've seen these systems ridden in very wet conditions without any adverse effects. Battery life is long enough to where you can run a few months at a time without having to recharge.

Me, I'm a SRAM guy, and you'll have a hard time getting me away from SRAM road groups, because the shifters fit my hands very well and I like the feel of the levers. However, Shimano's Di2 offerings are fantastic. Anyone who talks smack about them is typically going to say something like, "Electronic shifting? That's just over-complicating a simple machine!" and is thus a luddite that you can tell to get out of the room when the high-end component talk is in effect. People who have actually ridden the stuff know better. The only sticking point is that it's very expensive.

I haven't gotten to try Campy's electronic offering, but everything I've heard indicates it's just as robust as Di2. There are differences but I won't remark on them until I have the chance to test ride it.

This is nigh obscene, but...I haven't ridden the bike yet. Though cruise around a few blocks doesn't count. Very different feel even during that short cruise. It's a steel frame but light as a small dog. Shifting will take some getting used to, but I'm pretty stoked.

This is nigh obscene, but...I haven't ridden the bike yet. Though cruise around a few blocks doesn't count. Very different feel even during that short cruise. I'm a bit more upright which is certainly due to geometry and angle of the bars, but also I assume because the bike's not too small for me. It's a steel frame but light as a small dog. Shifting will take some getting used to, but I'm pretty stoked.

WipEout wrote:

I got to ride a couple of Shimano's Dura-Ace bikes, and it was nice, to say the least. At the time, though, I heard the Tour de France riders were having calibration issues on the front derailleur that was throwing the chain over the outside chainring, but I'm sure, 3 years later, that issue has been resolved.

Given the tremendous amount of testing that went into it all pre-release, I wouldn't be surprised if this hadn't even been "bugs", but instead was error in setup by the team mechanics. Di2 series front derailleurs have high limit screws that work in reverse of traditional limit screws - the more you turn the screw inwards, the further out the derailleur can move. Worst of all, it's not always visually apparent that this is what's happening since the effects of high and low limit adjustment may not be visibly apparent depending on the position of the front derailleur -emphasis here because you're not supposed to actuate the thing with your hand, which is one of the ways of checking limit adjustment in a mechanical system.

Shimano's English-language setup guide is also poorly written in a few spots and makes it easy to miss or mis-execute key steps - it's entirely possible that other languages were written similarly.

Got my RAGBRAI haircut done last night. May have gone a little wild this year

IMAGE(http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q133/serengeti000/IMG_2229.jpg)

(It's a wasp, 'cause I'm on Team Wasp)