"A Game of Thrones" Spoiler-Ridden Catch-All of Doom - books and HBO show

Spoiler:

Tyrion is actually Keyser Soze.

Nevin73 wrote:
Spoiler:

Tyrion is actually Keyser Soze.

Damnit, was just about to post

Spoiler:

Kevin Spacey is Coldhands

Spoiler:

Yo Mama

Spoiler:

Jon Targaryen

...

Spoiler:

What?

hbi2k wrote:
Spoiler:

Jon Targaryen

...

Spoiler:

What?

Spoiler:

Halfhand is actually the six-fingered man.

Spoiler:

prepare to die.

Also

Spoiler:

chariots chariots.

Okay, I just saw the episode, and found it to be a bit less compelling than I'd hoped for.

My only two real issues though were that a), Dany sentencing Xaro and Doreah to die by starvation rather than just a quick execution seemed way too vicious for the character, and b) finishing on 'three blasts... Wildlings' would've been a way more dramatic finisher than a minute-or-so of showing off their Walking Dead makeup.

Oh, and I'm worried that having Robb's motivations for marrying the Jeyne character (Talissa?) change from his overly noble wish to protect her honour after what he made seem like a moment of weakness to 'FTP, I DO WHAT I WANT' will make people respond with a lot less horror and a lot more 'Yeh, that's what you get when you screw EVERYBODY over with your penis'.

I thought the season ended great. My wife, who has not read the books, was pretty blown away too. There were a few missteps this season, but nothing unforgivable. I am already chomping at the bit for Season 3.

heavyfeul wrote:

I think they are setting up for a real emotional hit. In the book I got the sense that Tryion's relationship was Shea was built on both of them "pretending" to love each other, but Tyrion's last trauma forced his psyche to ignore that pretense on a vicersal level. I felt like Shea was a victim in the whole affair and Tryion used her in a very selfish way. He may have hoped for the best, but he is smart enough to know it would end as it did. It is something he has probably re-lived several times with other prostitutes.

I think they want to make the story more romantic, like they did with Rob and his love interest.

That and since they haven't been referring back to his first love (and marriage) over and over like they did in the book, they may be overloading Shea to represent both herself and the betrayal he felt over Tysha and making the impact harder when it happens this time around.

Ranger Rick wrote:
heavyfeul wrote:

I think they are setting up for a real emotional hit. In the book I got the sense that Tryion's relationship was Shea was built on both of them "pretending" to love each other, but Tyrion's last trauma forced his psyche to ignore that pretense on a vicersal level. I felt like Shea was a victim in the whole affair and Tryion used her in a very selfish way. He may have hoped for the best, but he is smart enough to know it would end as it did. It is something he has probably re-lived several times with other prostitutes.

I think they want to make the story more romantic, like they did with Rob and his love interest.

That and since they haven't been referring back to his first love (and marriage) over and over like they did in the book, they may be overloading Shea to represent both herself and the betrayal he felt over Tysha and making the impact harder when it happens this time around.

Makes sense. Charles Dance is such an awesome Tywin that it would take a major shock to justify Tyrion murdering him to the TV audience.

Nevin73 wrote:
Spoiler:

Tyrion is actually Keyser Soze.

Ironically, I've never seen that movie, but I know the spoiler anyways. The big reveal was ruined for for me sometime in the first couple of weeks of the movie having been out, so I've never gotten around to actually seeing it.

Also,

Spoiler:

Joffrey is Sam's father!

Spoiler:

Bran is the Golden Child, and Eddie Murphy plays Tywin's horse.

I was right about the nudity. There is a perv producer! Quite a bit of it always felt out of place and pandering. What I do not understand is why? There is x-rated sex and horror in the book. Plenty of depravity to choose from. Why not give it a context?

http://www.complex.com/pop-culture/2012/06/neil-marshall-explains-why-game-of-thrones-has-so-much-nudity

Original:
http://www.empireonline.com/news/story.asp?NID=34164

I love gossip.

Ranger Rick wrote:
Nevin73 wrote:
Spoiler:

Tyrion is actually Keyser Soze.

Ironically, I've never seen that movie, but I know the spoiler anyways. The big reveal was ruined for for me sometime in the first couple of weeks of the movie having been out, so I've never gotten around to actually seeing it.

Don't feel bad. The big reveal was ruined for me by, y'know, watching the first half of the movie and knowing how movies work. As a twist, it's highly overrated.

Quintin_Stone wrote:
Spoiler:

Anakin Lannister is Jon Snow's father.

The best one yet! But...

Spoiler:

Lemon cakes are people!

Obligatory

I just got the 4 book boxed set. I'm pretty sure that the HBO show covers the first two books at this point. Is there any substantial portion of story that has been left out of the show that is from the 2nd book?

Gimpy_Butzke wrote:

I just got the 4 book boxed set. I'm pretty sure that the HBO show covers the first two books at this point. Is there any substantial portion of story that has been left out of the show that is from the 2nd book?

You should read from the beginning of the first book. Even at points where the plot isn't divergent and there aren't missing characters or scenes or whatever, the books are of such quality that you will get a lot out of reading scenes that are faithfully rendered in the show.

Trust me, you'll be very glad you did.

zeroKFE wrote:
Gimpy_Butzke wrote:

I just got the 4 book boxed set. I'm pretty sure that the HBO show covers the first two books at this point. Is there any substantial portion of story that has been left out of the show that is from the 2nd book?

You should read from the beginning of the first book. Even at point where the plot isn't divergent or there aren't missing characters or scenes or whatever, the books are of such quality that you will get a lot out of reading scenes that are faithfully rendered in the show.

Trust me, you'll be very glad you did. :)

Yes. There is substantially more nuance to the characters in the books; their motivations and experiences are much more fully realized and you better understand the tapestry that is being woven (which is very intricate between the various houses). The show is definitely hitting on the major plot points, but there is a lot being left out.

HedgeWizard wrote:
zeroKFE wrote:
Gimpy_Butzke wrote:

I just got the 4 book boxed set. I'm pretty sure that the HBO show covers the first two books at this point. Is there any substantial portion of story that has been left out of the show that is from the 2nd book?

You should read from the beginning of the first book. Even at point where the plot isn't divergent or there aren't missing characters or scenes or whatever, the books are of such quality that you will get a lot out of reading scenes that are faithfully rendered in the show.

Trust me, you'll be very glad you did. :)

Yes. There is substantially more nuance to the characters in the books; their motivations and experiences are much more fully realized and you better understand the tapestry that is being woven (which is very intricate between the various houses). The show is definitely hitting on the major plot points, but there is a lot being left out.

I didn't mean to mislead you guys. I am definitely going to read from the very beginning. I just wanted to know if the end of season two matches with the end of book two. I don't want to read ahead of the show. That may change once I finish book two but right now I plan on reading each book after it's happened on the show.

Gimpy_Butzke wrote:
HedgeWizard wrote:
zeroKFE wrote:
Gimpy_Butzke wrote:

I just got the 4 book boxed set. I'm pretty sure that the HBO show covers the first two books at this point. Is there any substantial portion of story that has been left out of the show that is from the 2nd book?

You should read from the beginning of the first book. Even at point where the plot isn't divergent or there aren't missing characters or scenes or whatever, the books are of such quality that you will get a lot out of reading scenes that are faithfully rendered in the show.

Trust me, you'll be very glad you did. :)

Yes. There is substantially more nuance to the characters in the books; their motivations and experiences are much more fully realized and you better understand the tapestry that is being woven (which is very intricate between the various houses). The show is definitely hitting on the major plot points, but there is a lot being left out.

I didn't mean to mislead you guys. I am definitely going to read from the very beginning. I just wanted to know if the end of season two matches with the end of book two. I don't want to read ahead of the show. That may change once I finish book two but right now I plan on reading each book after it's happened on the show.

Roughly, yes. A little material from book 3 has made it into season 2, but not much.

I would have had a hard time taking a break after A Clash of Kings (second book). A Storm of Swords is my favorite book in the series. It was a good time just reading them all together.

i38warhawk wrote:

I would have had a hard time taking a break after A Clash of Kings (second book). A Storm of Swords is my favorite book in the series. It was a good time just reading them all together.

This is true for me so much so that I thought most of what happened in clash of kings actually happened in storm of swords. Whodathunk.

GRRM loves cliffhangers. I once you pick up the first book, he has you. It is an old cheap trick, but still very effective at getting you to crack the next book.

I highly recommend the audio book, if you are into audio books. The narration/performance by Roy Dotrice is excellent.

My only criticism is that all his character voices sound like gruff old men, which is great for the 80-something-percent of characters who actually are gruff old men, but sounds a little weird when it's, for example, Cersei.

That's in comparison to, say, the Harry Potter audiobooks by Stephen Fry, who does an excellent job of suggesting a feminine tone when speaking for female characters without getting into full-on falsetto Terry-Jones-as-Brian's-Mom territory.

hbi2k wrote:

My only criticism is that all his character voices sound like gruff old men, which is great for the 80-something-percent of characters who actually are gruff old men, but sounds a little weird when it's, for example, Cersei.

That's in comparison to, say, the Harry Potter audiobooks by Stephen Fry, who does an excellent job of suggesting a feminine tone when speaking for female characters without getting into full-on falsetto Terry-Jones-as-Brian's-Mom territory.

Or James Marsters in the Dresden audiobooks

Quintin_Stone wrote:
Spoiler:

Anakin Lannister is Jon Snow's father.

Spoiler:

Snape kills Maester Aemon

Farscry wrote:
Quintin_Stone wrote:
Spoiler:

Anakin Lannister is Jon Snow's father.

Spoiler:

Snape kills Maester Aemon

Spoiler:

Maester Aemon is gay, but this fact will never have any relevance to the plot or character and you'd only ever know it by reading deep between the lines.

Spoiler:

And by "between the lines," I mean "outside the lines," and in fact, "outside the books and in an interview with an author desperate to still be relevant with her his career-defining masterpiece finished and a long boring slog through obscurity toward death stretching out before her him.

Ha ha! Just kidding!

Spoiler:

G.R.R. Martin's career-defining masterpiece will never be complete.

Tanglebones wrote:
hbi2k wrote:

My only criticism is that all his character voices sound like gruff old men, which is great for the 80-something-percent of characters who actually are gruff old men, but sounds a little weird when it's, for example, Cersei.

That's in comparison to, say, the Harry Potter audiobooks by Stephen Fry, who does an excellent job of suggesting a feminine tone when speaking for female characters without getting into full-on falsetto Terry-Jones-as-Brian's-Mom territory.

Or James Marsters in the Dresden audiobooks

It's funny that you mention this, because Marsters attempts at female voices always distract me and take me right out of the story. He tried doing it for a while in a kind of exaggerated fashion, and it really really got to me. Then he backed off a lot for a few books and I was pretty happy, and then he started it again. Have been fairly bummed since he renewed the practice. It got to me enough in the last one I was listening to that I actually stalled out and stopped listening.