Ran a 5K today

Sometimes exercising when I'm feeling crap seems to fight it off.

Maq wrote:

Ugh. Getting a cold. I should suspend the training if I have a cold, right?

Depends. Accepted wisdom is the "above the neck" rule. If your symptoms are only above the neck (i.e. sniffles and cough) you can continue training. If they're below the neck (chest congestion), you should rest until you're fixed up.

Bear in mind that even for "above the neck" stuff, you'll most likely be tired from being sick, so you should reduce intensity and/or duration.

My personal take on it is to never feel bad for bailing on training if I'm actually sick. That's not an excuse to use a slight sniffle to be lazy, but conversely there's no point thrashing yourself to the point of exhaustion - that's only going to keep you sick for longer, and that's counter-productive for your long-term training goals.

I tend to listen to my body: if i'm exhausted, I let myself rest. I got in a bit of trouble this week when I skipped a couple of runs, then tried to cram them all together on consecutive days in order not to fall behind on my training calendar. It all sorted itself out, but on the third hard day in a row, I had a terrible run due to lack of recovery. (read: because I'm in piss-poor shape. There's a catch22 of trying to build fitness without overdoing it: after I get in better shape, I can afford to take more days off.)

Some folks recommend the neck rule and there is some science to back it up. If all of your symptoms are above your neck, you can run. If the gunk is in your lungs, let yourself recover.

(Removed stupid comment.)

Maq wrote:

Ugh. Getting a cold. I should suspend the training if I have a cold, right?

Head cold, you should be fine. Chest cold, I'd wait.

ColdForged wrote:

I puked and passed out on the bathroom floor in the middle of the night Saturday so I bailed on my 18 mile training run on Sunday. I refuse to feel guilt.

Yea, I wouldn't feel guilty about that either.

I puked and passed out on the bathroom floor in the middle of the night Saturday so I bailed on my 18 mile training run on Sunday. I refuse to feel guilt.

I should clarify this wasn't self-inflicted, it was (according to the doc) viral.

Any shoe advice?
Been running on cross trainers. Thankfully I can't ru very far.
Signed up for tough mudder in the spring. I'm getting on proper shoes for the higher volume.

Saw Nike shox, Nike lunar-something. I'm looking for light but not minimalist.

Also, a bit of a nagging ache at the bottom of my kneecap. What's the threshold for hoping it goes away?

Ghostship wrote:

Any shoe advice?
Been running on cross trainers. Thankfully I can't ru very far.
Signed up for tough mudder in the spring. I'm getting on proper shoes for the higher volume.

Saw Nike shox, Nike lunar-something. I'm looking for light but not minimalist.

Also, a bit of a nagging ache at the bottom of my kneecap. What's the threshold for hoping it goes away?

Every foot is different. Every shoe is slightly different too.

Been looking at this for a while now. I own 2 pairs of expensive running shoes I bought at the same time in June.

1. Nike Vomero 7 - This is categorized as a cushioning neutral shoe. more cushioning
2. Asics Kayano 18 - This is categorized as a stability shoe. more support

Both are comfortable to wear and run in. I slightly like the Nike's better. I am a bit faster in them too. They are a little bit lighter.

Also when I was buying I tried some Muzino or Brooks. Didn't like the arch support.

The shoes I was running with before were last year's Nike Pegasus. Also a neutral shoe but I felt after a couple hundred miles in those the cushioning was worn out. My feet would hurt after more than 3 miles. I read that shoes should last between 300 and 500 miles.

The Nike Lunar series are stability shoes.
The Nike Shox are a neutral shoe.

I bet your trainers are more like a stability shoe than a neutral one.

Personally, I am not a fan of expensive and heavily cushioned running shoes with a large heel-toe drop. I switched to a super-minimal shoe over a year and a half ago and haven't looked back since, and have had far, far fewer injuries after doing so.

That said, hit up a reputable store and talk with folks there. I'd recommend looking at things like the Merrell trail glove or other similar minimalist transition shoes.

I looked at the NB and merrel trail glove.
It was sports experts, so they'll all be last years shoes.
The NB says on the tag, to phase it in beginning with 10% of training. I would expect that advice applies across that type of shoe.
To me that meant buying two pairs. One to use while phasing in the other.

One other reason to not totally switch to minimalist, was the tough mudder course. I expect to be wearing cross trainers for that.

AnimeJ wrote:

Personally, I am not a fan of expensive and heavily cushioned running shoes with a large heel-toe drop. I switched to a super-minimal shoe over a year and a half ago and haven't looked back since, and have had far, far fewer injuries after doing so.

That said, hit up a reputable store and talk with folks there. I'd recommend looking at things like the Merrell trail glove or other similar minimalist transition shoes.

I think my next shoe is going to be a more minimalist type. Maybe the Nike Free Runs. These actually have style.

I know that doesn't matter but those glove shoes are ugly.

.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

Speaking of time, I went for my first lunch run! We just moved our office about 6 blocks from my house, so now I can go for a quick run on my lunch break. It's going to be awesome not having to run right when I get home from work.

Lunch runs are awesome. I did it three more times since I last posted on it. Still haven't showered. Just cooled down and wiped myself off.

Ghostship wrote:

I looked at the NB and merrel trail glove.
It was sports experts, so they'll all be last years shoes.
The NB says on the tag, to phase it in beginning with 10% of training. I would expect that advice applies across that type of shoe.
To me that meant buying two pairs. One to use while phasing in the other.

I've used the NB Minimus Zero Road and the NB Minimus WT20v2 Trail. You definitely have to phase it in. When I started out earlier this year, I ran mostly in the WT20v2s because they are less aggressive. They are still pretty aggressive, though, and your calves will die at first. I ran every other day and tried to walk on the off days. I didn't really use any other shoes which might not have been the best option. Well, if you were going to start with just the zeros, you would definitely want something else too. The problem with the WT20v2s is that they are not durable, so I can't recommend them. After a few weeks, I was getting holes in the top of the toebox area where the shoe hinges as you run. I ended up just throwing glue on them every once in awhile to keep them going, but I was not happy about it. So, I don't recommend buying those. The zeros are very durable and I haven't had any issue with the two pairs I have now.

Anyways, I'm happily using the zeros all the time now. They are pretty narrow, so I use the regular width that I initially bought without socks and a wide pair I bought later with socks. I usually only run a quick 3 miles 5-6 days a week with an occasional 5 miler thrown in there. I'm really happy I went with some minimal shoes.

Speaking of time, I went for my first lunch run! We just moved our office about 6 blocks from my house, so now I can go for a quick run on my lunch break. It's going to be awesome not having to run right when I get home from work.

Ghostship wrote:

I looked at the NB and merrel trail glove.
It was sports experts, so they'll all be last years shoes.
The NB says on the tag, to phase it in beginning with 10% of training. I would expect that advice applies across that type of shoe.
To me that meant buying two pairs. One to use while phasing in the other.

One other reason to not totally switch to minimalist, was the tough mudder course. I expect to be wearing cross trainers for that.

If you can come by my office in Gatineau, across from the museum of Civilisation, on Tuesday, I have a 20% off NB coupon for The Running Room that was part of the Army Run Swag.

Ghostship wrote:

I looked at the NB and merrel trail glove.
It was sports experts, so they'll all be last years shoes.
The NB says on the tag, to phase it in beginning with 10% of training. I would expect that advice applies across that type of shoe.
To me that meant buying two pairs. One to use while phasing in the other.

One other reason to not totally switch to minimalist, was the tough mudder course. I expect to be wearing cross trainers for that.

If you can come by my office in Gatineau, across from the museum of Civilisation, on Tuesday, I have a 20% off NB coupon for The Running Room that was part of the Army Run Swag.

goman wrote:
AnimeJ wrote:

Personally, I am not a fan of expensive and heavily cushioned running shoes with a large heel-toe drop. I switched to a super-minimal shoe over a year and a half ago and haven't looked back since, and have had far, far fewer injuries after doing so.

That said, hit up a reputable store and talk with folks there. I'd recommend looking at things like the Merrell trail glove or other similar minimalist transition shoes.

I think my next shoe is going to be a more minimalist type. Maybe the Nike Free Runs. These actually have style.

I know that doesn't matter but those glove shoes are ugly.

While Nike advertises the Frees as minimalist, they're anything but.

AnimeJ wrote:
goman wrote:
AnimeJ wrote:

Personally, I am not a fan of expensive and heavily cushioned running shoes with a large heel-toe drop. I switched to a super-minimal shoe over a year and a half ago and haven't looked back since, and have had far, far fewer injuries after doing so.

That said, hit up a reputable store and talk with folks there. I'd recommend looking at things like the Merrell trail glove or other similar minimalist transition shoes.

I think my next shoe is going to be a more minimalist type. Maybe the Nike Free Runs. These actually have style.

I know that doesn't matter but those glove shoes are ugly.

While Nike advertises the Frees as minimalist, they're anything but.

I said "a more minimalist type" for that reason. I know they aren't "minimalist." I don't want minimalist.

I'm aware. However, what I'm saying is that if you want anything remotely minimalist, the Free is not what you are looking for. Even though Nike advertises it as such, it is not, in any way, shape or form minimalist, or even approaching minimalist. It's a lightweight traditional shoe.

mudbunny wrote:
Ghostship wrote:

I looked at the NB and merrel trail glove.
It was sports experts, so they'll all be last years shoes.
The NB says on the tag, to phase it in beginning with 10% of training. I would expect that advice applies across that type of shoe.
To me that meant buying two pairs. One to use while phasing in the other.

One other reason to not totally switch to minimalist, was the tough mudder course. I expect to be wearing cross trainers for that.

If you can come by my office in Gatineau, across from the museum of Civilisation, on Tuesday, I have a 20% off NB coupon for The Running Room that was part of the Army Run Swag.

Thanks for the offer MB. Actually, I'm in the Toronto area this weekend, and forgot my shoes. That may push up the new shoe purchase so I can get a couple of runs in.

Say what you want, but any time I tried running historically, even with decent Asics (~$100), my knees—and especially my right knee—would be sore. I have since started wearing a pair of Five Fingers, on the advice of my brother-in-law (Green Beret + Ranger + applied for Delta selection—that is, has a professional interest in staying in shape). I have very little pain now, and finished my second 5k this morning. Starting training for a 10k.

They may not fit longer runs. We'll see. But with a pair of Injini socks, it's a great fit.

Barefoot/minimalist running is definitely doable for longer runs. I watched a guy finish the USAF Marathon barefoot a few weeks back. His time was ~5 minutes short of 4 hours.

Ugh, I have my Navy PFT coming up next week, and decided to switch up my normal run, which is a meditative steady pace, with a walk/sprint mixture. I was actually really enjoying it right up until I hit a patch of rough ground (I don't run on the pavement, but on the side of the trail) and twisted my ankle. That ankle has been weak since I injured it about eight years ago playing Ultimate, and just when I thought that the ankle was back at baseline, here we are again. Happily, in order for a doctor to evaluate the injury, I just have to look at the man in the mirror. No indication for imaging by the Ottowa Ankle Rules, and I'm fairly sure it's a partial tear of the calcaneofibular ligament at the calcaneal insertion. So it's been some NSAIDs, some icing, and I'm trying to rest it. I'm pretty sure that 1.5 miles for time on Thursday should be doable, but I'm going to defer any long distance running for probably at least a few weeks. Talk about timing!

This is where you get a colleague to write you a profile man. Take it easy till it'll bear weight if it's not already.

AnimeJ wrote:

This is where you get a colleague to write you a profile man. Take it easy till it'll bear weight if it's not already.

Need a passing PFT to get my flight surgery spot. If it weren't for that, I'd just have a buddy give me a profile for a bit. It bears weight just fine, but I'm going to baby it until Thursday.

Woohoo... I ran 10 miles for the first time on Saturday. Bleeding nipples and chafing in the nether regions. But it was awesome.

Sore yesterday but feel great now!

I didn't realize my nipples were bleeding until I got back home. It really didn't hurt that much.

goman wrote:

Woohoo... I ran 10 miles for the first time on Saturday. Bleeding nipples and chafing in the nether regions. But it was awesome.

Sore yesterday but feel great now!

I didn't realize my nipples were bleeding until I got back home. It really didn't hurt that much.

Thank you. You have, in a few short sentences, completely erased a concern of mine that I need to start running again. You had me at bleeding nipples and, sir, you never looked back.

Coldstream wrote:
AnimeJ wrote:

This is where you get a colleague to write you a profile man. Take it easy till it'll bear weight if it's not already.

Need a passing PFT to get my flight surgery spot. If it weren't for that, I'd just have a buddy give me a profile for a bit. It bears weight just fine, but I'm going to baby it until Thursday.

Bleh. Well, you know what you're doing, so take care of it. I'd brace it too if you're not already.

goman wrote:

Woohoo... I ran 10 miles for the first time on Saturday. Bleeding nipples and chafing in the nether regions. But it was awesome.

The bleeding nipples can be fixed in one of two ways. The first is to get Body Glide. It comes in the form of an applicator similar to that of underarm deodorant. Rub it liberally on your nipples, and your problem should disappear. The other is to choose a different type of material for the shirt you wear. The one time I ended up with bleeding nipples was because I wore a shirt that, when it got wet with sweat, got really, really heavy.

The chafing in the nether regions...that depends on just where. My thighs will chafe if I wear the wrong style of running shorts. Also, avoid anything with a seam down the inside of your legs. Body Glide will also work wonders there as well.

I've found that spandex under your running shorts also works to prevent chafing in the nether.