Sports Book Club

I know that Legion is basically leading us on a tour of book on football, but I thought I'd pass this along and see who is interested.

Guys from a forum, Bernie's Pressbox, are having a summer book club of sorts. It is a forum for St. Louis sports writer and talk show host, Bernie Miklasz. It is part of the St. Louis Post Dispatch web site.

The first book is Scorecasting: The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports Are Played and Games Are Won. I thought some of you might be interested in reading this, too. It looks interesting, but i have not picked it up yet.

Thanks for the tip on this book. It looks interesting and I'm going to look for it at my local Library system.

I am of course all for this idea.

Jayhawker wrote:

Scorecasting: The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports Are Played and Games Are Won

The Steven Levitt review saying it's "[t]he closest thing to Freakonomics I've seen since the original" has me sold. I <3 empirical analysis laying waste to "conventional wisdom".

I know that Legion is basically leading us on a tour of book on football

And it's only going to get bigger. Vic Ketchman just posted his "top 10" all-time football book list, and nine of the ten are not in my new collection. So I have nine more books to get. Though his choices tend to be more along the lines of books about a specific person, game, or season, versus the kind of books I favor, which are more about the game itself, or the inner workings/behind-the-scenes of the league. But I trust his choices are probably among the "best of breed" of those types of books and won't let me down.

I grabbed a copy. I read a similar book a while back, that I can't immediately recall (Stumbling on Wins, I think), and it was pretty interesting.

I also loved Freakonoimics.

id stay away from soccernomics. Found it was very meh.

I don't need 50 pages of empirical evidence to know England doesn't win world cups because they are actually fairly average at soccer. My own eyes have been confirming this for a very long time.

I lent away my copy of the book of basketball by bill simmons but from the little I did read its must own for anyone who likes basketball. Great source to read about all the players you never probably saw depending on your age.

edit: Fever Pitch by Nick Hornby is great even for non soccer fans. Explains the obsession people have with their teams and how the highs and lows of them winning is sometimes better then anything else.

*Legion* wrote:

The Steven Levitt review saying it's "[t]he closest thing to Freakonomics I've seen since the original" has me sold. I <3 empirical analysis laying waste to "conventional wisdom".

Baseball Between the Numbers is a few years old now, but it's got some great stuff in it along those same lines.

And, even though it's not analytical at all, Ball Four is a must read for any baseball fan. Still one of the funniest books I've read and it's a quick enough read that I go back to it during spring training every couple of years.

I'm about halfway through the book, and I'm really enjoying it. It covers a lot of the stuff that Freakonomics does, like risk aversion and such, but through a sports lens.

Interestingly, the discussion about going for it on 4th down has me wanting to change the way that I play Madden and NCAA. Maybe the cheesers aren't so cheesy after-all.

I recently finished Josh Hamilton's book, Beyond Belief, and it was pretty interesting to read about how low his life really brought him. I had always pictured him as a typical party person and a baseball player, but he lived a pretty sheltered life and then the money kind of messed him up.

Golfers should read THE SPIRIT OF ST ANDREWS by Dr Alistair MacKenzie.

Shows where the golden age of golf course design began so you can compare it with the dross that most modern courses are serving up now.

Jay, did they ever pick a second book?

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game by Michael Lewis.

In fact, just about any book by Mr. Lewis is worth reading.

MacBrave wrote:

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game by Michael Lewis.

In fact, just about any book by Mr. Lewis is worth reading.

Moneyball is a great one. The Blind Side (also by Lewis) is worth reading too.

TheCounselor wrote:
MacBrave wrote:

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game by Michael Lewis.

In fact, just about any book by Mr. Lewis is worth reading.

Moneyball is a great one. The Blind Side (also by Lewis) is worth reading too.

Yeah, The Blind Side was pretty good to read as well.

"Three Nights in August: Strategy, Heartbreak, and Joy Inside the Mind of a Manager" by Buzz Bissinger is one of the books on baseball I enjoyed allot. Reading about La Russa's mindset on playing the game; shorts on players not only on his team but others is very interesting to read.

And of course the old classic, Jim Boutons, 'Ball Four'.

There's a new one coming out called Those Guys Have All The Fun (NSFW excerpt at GQ), a tell all about the behind the scenes stuff at ESPN.