Whiskey and Scotch Recomendations

McIrishJihad wrote:

Had a glass of Laphroaig 10yr with dinner last night, and gotta say I'm not really a fan. Glad I tried it, but was way too peaty for me.

Guess I'll be sticking to the Highlands and Speysides.

I'm with you, I think it tastes like turpentine. Something tells me we should drink Scotch together.

I got a bottle of Redemption Rye and it is pretty delicious.

Today I started a batch of homemade vanilla extract with vodka and another with Buffalo Trace.

Fredrik_S wrote:

Picked up a bottle of Balvenie. Rum aged. Looking forward to seeing if you all were right since it's getting universal praise on here. :)

I have a bottle of this right now too, and I really like it. Not quite as much as their 15yr, but it's still pretty great.

Has anyone tried Sheep Dip? Seems like it might offer a new experience to guys like me who stick to blends like JW Black and haven't yet ventured into single malt territory.

Also, is JW Double Black worth it? It's actually being sold for less than a standard bottle of Black.

I've added a new critter to my whiskey shelf. Caribou Crossing is a Canadian single barrel whiskey that entered the market back in 2010 and over the past two years has racked up some impressive accolades in both the press and in competition. Whiskey Advocate rating: 93. Seems like a pretty unique animal as far as Canadian whiskey goes.

FSeven wrote:

Has anyone tried Sheep Dip? Seems like it might offer a new experience to guys like me who stick to blends like JW Black and haven't yet ventured into single malt territory.

It's a pretty good single malt, but there's not a whole lot that's special about it. It's a very solid scotch for the price, but after having had it it didn't have enough going for it over like a Glenlivet 12 to buy my own bottle. It's on the lighter side too, if that's more your style.

FSeven wrote:

Also, is JW Double Black worth it? It's actually being sold for less than a standard bottle of Black.

Oh God Yes.

I started my journey with scotch whiskey on single malts like Bowmore and Glenmorangie years ago but since picking up a bottle of JW Double Black, it's been my go to drink. As close to an islay single malt as JW has done from all of theirs that I've tasted so far.

Cheap whiskey alert. Trader Joe's sells their own bourbon.

IMAGE(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-rZT6lBxat_g/UKkvIG67bSI/AAAAAAAABng/Nvs73bZ2vSc/s320/TJB2.jpg)

750 ml for $15.

I found it sweeter than the other bourbons I've tried but still tastes like bourbon.

http://recenteats.blogspot.com/2012/...

The above link says it is brewed by Barton.

I just picked up a bottle of Four Roses Single Barrel. I'm slowly coming around on this bourbon thing.

I looked for that Forty Creek someone suggested a while ago, and no sign of it. Nor of the other whiskey that was recommended in the same post.

I'm pondering if I really don't quite belong in the thread, though. As stated, I'm loving Irish Mist, and most whiskeys labeled similar all fall into the liqueur category, same as the Irish Mist does. I think next item to try will be Bailey's Irish Cream and see how that is.

Phishposer wrote:

I just picked up a bottle of Four Roses Single Barrel. I'm slowly coming around on this bourbon thing.

That is a solid whiskey. A bit on the sweet side, but still very solid.

ccesarano wrote:

I looked for that Forty Creek someone suggested a while ago, and no sign of it. Nor of the other whiskey that was recommended in the same post.

I'm pondering if I really don't quite belong in the thread, though. As stated, I'm loving Irish Mist, and most whiskeys labeled similar all fall into the liqueur category, same as the Irish Mist does. I think next item to try will be Bailey's Irish Cream and see how that is.

I swear I'm not stalking you around the GWJ site, but Bailey's on the rocks is a pretty fantastic way to go through drink coupons on Southwest

gravity wrote:
McIrishJihad wrote:

Had a glass of Laphroaig 10yr with dinner last night, and gotta say I'm not really a fan. Glad I tried it, but was way too peaty for me.

Guess I'll be sticking to the Highlands and Speysides.

I'm with you, I think it tastes like turpentine. Something tells me we should drink Scotch together.

Hm, yeah, the quarter cask is a little too much like a leathery oil flavour to me. I have the taste of chloro-septic sore throat spray scarred on my mind, and anything which comes close automatically jumps the gap.

McIrishJihad wrote:
ccesarano wrote:

I looked for that Forty Creek someone suggested a while ago, and no sign of it. Nor of the other whiskey that was recommended in the same post.

I'm pondering if I really don't quite belong in the thread, though. As stated, I'm loving Irish Mist, and most whiskeys labeled similar all fall into the liqueur category, same as the Irish Mist does. I think next item to try will be Bailey's Irish Cream and see how that is.

I swear I'm not stalking you around the GWJ site, but Bailey's on the rocks is a pretty fantastic way to go through drink coupons on Southwest :D

Agreed. Bailey's rocks is sweet and creamy and good anytime. It's easy to overindulge and the calorie count per shot is higher than your typical whiskey, but life was meant to be lived dangerously.

Falchion wrote:
FSeven wrote:

Also, is JW Double Black worth it? It's actually being sold for less than a standard bottle of Black.

Oh God Yes.

I started my journey with scotch whiskey on single malts like Bowmore and Glenmorangie years ago but since picking up a bottle of JW Double Black, it's been my go to drink. As close to an islay single malt as JW has done from all of theirs that I've tasted so far.

Where are you finding the Double Black for that price? If you want to share the wealth.

Secret Asian Man wrote:
Falchion wrote:
FSeven wrote:

Also, is JW Double Black worth it? It's actually being sold for less than a standard bottle of Black.

Oh God Yes.

I started my journey with scotch whiskey on single malts like Bowmore and Glenmorangie years ago but since picking up a bottle of JW Double Black, it's been my go to drink. As close to an islay single malt as JW has done from all of theirs that I've tasted so far.

Where are you finding the Double Black for that price? If you want to share the wealth.

I dunno, you got to ask FSeven. I too want to know even though I won't be able to take advantage of it.

Liquor store here in Clifton, NJ.

If I remember correctly, a bottle of Black was $38.99 and the Double Black was $34.99. I saw it the night before Thanksgiving. While I may have the prices off by a dollar or two, I distinctly remember the Double Black was several dollars less because I had never heard of it before and looked it up on my cell right in the store.

I'll check again before the weekend is out. If the prices are the same, I would have no problem buying some for folks but the price+shipping might end up being the same as if you purchased a bottle locally.

Merry Christmas to me!

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Just picked up a bottle of Whistlepig Rye, and it lives up to it's reputation. Just a lovely flavor throughout, without the grain alcohol bite you'd get with bourbon or many other whiskeys. Any other rye fans out there? Any good cocktails that use it? (I've found a few, but I'm still curious - I'm a fan of 18th and 19th century cocktails.)

BTW, the head distiller at Whistlepig also held that role at Maker's Mark for 14 years. Maybe you've heard of it...

If you like bourbon, try a good small batch rye. There's a reason our forefathers loved the stuff.

Robear wrote:

Any good cocktails that use it? (I've found a few, but I'm still curious - I'm a fan of 18th and 19th century cocktails.)

Well, most (if not all) of the classic whiskey cocktails in the US were originally made with Rye before Bourbon really caught on in the south and elsewhere during Prohibition. So Manhattans, Old Fashioneds, Whiskey Sours, etc. I think that the Sazerac was made with it in the 19th century, too, after phylox. and its ilk almost wiped out the French grapes from which cognac was made (hence the whole root grafting thing that continues to this day).

I'm a sucker for Sazeracs and Manhattans. I just can't get myself to buy a bottle of absinthe (and the rest of the materials) to make a proper Sazeracs at home.

I just had my first rye Manhatten. 3 oz Whistlepig, 3 oz M&R Sweet Vermouth, 2 dashes bitters, ice. Very, very tasty. The drink sweetens up after a few sips, and the rye spiciness really carries it from that point on. Satisfying. (I know people argue about the proportions, but I found 3 to 1.5 and 1 to 2 at the outer ranges, so I kind of split the difference for my first try.)

I bet a good teaspoon of powdered sugar would really punch it up, too. Or maybe a little Rose's lime.

McIrish, Absinthe (or Chartreuse) is a good mixer, so it's a worthwhile investment even if you don't drink it straight. Both are incredibly powerful herbal flavors, though, so the drinks you make will be on the complex side, and distinctly old school.

Make sure to get a good absinthe; the fake ones are bad enough that you might as well get Pastis or something like that.

Robear wrote:

I bet a good teaspoon of powdered sugar would really punch it up, too. Or maybe a little Rose's lime.

Well sure, but if you add sugar and citrus then it's an Old Fashioned.

Well, technically you'd have to take away the vermouth first. Glad you liked it, though.

I'm still learning this stuff. I do enjoy Old Fashioneds, however. Now I know why.

The spectacular bartender at the local lesbian bar makes fantastic drinks. It took me a very long time to ever make my way in because it's the local lesbian bar and I'm far from a lesbian. I told her I like Manhattans and she made me two very tasty takes on a Manhattan. She added some simple syrup and the bitters and used a bar spoon to coat the inside of the glass, then added the rye, vermouth, and a blood orange liqueur. She finished it off by taking a small slice of orange peel, squeezing it over the drink, then scorching it with a lighter to "caramelize the oils". It was very tasty (if a little too sweet for my tastes).

The second one she made was a take on a Manhattan with a barrel-aged gin and barrel-aged blood orange bitters (she also added another liquor of some kind that I wasn't familiar with and can't recall).

I once had a "Navy Sazerac" at The Green Goddess in New Orleans. It was your typical sazerac, but with local rum instead of local rye. If I hadn't already been drinking all day before getting to that thing, I probably would have remembered the rest of that night

The second one she made was a take on a Manhattan with a barrel-aged gin and barrel-aged blood orange bitters (she also added another liquor of some kind that I wasn't familiar with and can't recall).

Maybe Amaro? Italian herbal liqueur. (Why do I always spell that with 2 e's and one u at first? My wordbox is broken.) I've seen that in Manhatten recipes before.

The thing that struck me about the rye Manhatten is the way the flavors blend together after the first few sips. The sweetness comes out of hiding and it's just a smooth ride after that.

Phishposer wrote:
Fredrik_S wrote:

Picked up a bottle of Balvenie. Rum aged. Looking forward to seeing if you all were right since it's getting universal praise on here. :)

I have a bottle of this right now too, and I really like it. Not quite as much as their 15yr, but it's still pretty great.

I haven't tried the rum aged one yet, but I've had the one in sherry oak. A little sweet and very tasty. Definitely recommend it to someone looking to start out.

How is the rum aged one anyhow? Is it done the same way as the sherry, last 6 months in rum barrels?