Current favourite word?

"Puissant" is a very nice word.

That vocab thing is nifty. It estimates me at 41.7k

As a follow-up to callipygian, try colpocoquette. Noun, a woman with a large and/or attractive bosom who is aware of it and uses its allure with most heterosexual men in order to achieve a personal goal.

It makes me happy that we have words for such things.

Rallick wrote:

Ouch. Lobster made a comment on my mom? Now I know the Universe is operating backwards today!

Call a plumber, the system's backed up.

I like the word, 'carnivorous' - not sure it's a favourite word, but it's fun to say.

We should have a thread about words that look weird to you, or make you laugh; I'd vote for 'big' and 'nibblets' (respectively).

Edited to add: 'clerisy' - a distinct class of learned of literary people. i.e., NOT me (given my dismal score on that test).

Mimble wrote:

We should have a thread about words that look weird to you, or make you laugh

Must.

Haberdasher. The repetitive "h" and "er" sounds make it fun to say.

I'm also a fan of "Lusty".

DanyBoy wrote:

I'm also a fan of "Lusty".

I too am also a fan of "Lusty."

Anyone have regional words they like that aren't in common use outside their area. Up north we use the word 'ginnel' for a narrow passageway between two buildings.

pulchritudinous.

As in, "damn, she's so pulchritudinous!"

Katy wrote:

This is fun: http://testyourvocab.com/ I feel that I need to look up the words on page 2 that I didn't know.

(I came out with an approximate 34,000 word vocabulary, based on the test.)

Oh, and a word I like is mellifluous. Also graupel.

27 thousand, not bad for a non-native speaker. Intimate knowledge of Monty Python helped a bit. Of course I know what "terpsichorean" means!

I like "inchoate". Must take a break from Joanna Newsom, too much strange (yet evocative) vocabulary.

Obstreperous.
Perfidious
Nom

wanderingtaoist wrote:
Katy wrote:

This is fun: http://testyourvocab.com/ I feel that I need to look up the words on page 2 that I didn't know.

(I came out with an approximate 34,000 word vocabulary, based on the test.)

Oh, and a word I like is mellifluous. Also graupel.

27 thousand, not bad for a non-native speaker. Intimate knowledge of Monty Python helped a bit. Of course I know what "terpsichorean" means!

I like "inchoate". Must take a break from Joanna Newsom, too much strange (yet evocative) vocabulary.

Interesting test. Obviously it's just an approximation, but I got 34,100. While English is my second language, I've spent the majority of my life speaking it, and I'm probably more comfortable expressing myself in it than my native Dutch. I think the test was skewed in my favour somewhat due to the inclusion of words that don't get used very often any more, but which are quite common in a lot of the older books I read. Not to say I read books from the middle ages, but things from 100 to 150 years ago, like Sherlock Holmes.

Yesterday, I referred to a diagram handed to me as a "high-water mark of obfuscation."

So yeah, put me down for "obfuscation" today.

Rat Boy wrote:
DanyBoy wrote:

I'm also a fan of "Lusty".

I too am also a fan of "Lusty."

Also, I pulled a 38,200. I must work harder!

I think I will have a new word each day. Today, I am fond of "antipodean."

Hypatian wrote:

I think I will have a new word each day. Today, I am fond of "antipodean."

Why thankyou. You're not so bad yourself.

Contango
1. pricing situation in which futures prices get progressively higher as maturities get progressively longer, creating negative spreads as contracts go farther out. The increases reflect carrying costs, including storage, financing and insurance. The reverse condition, an inverted market, is termed backwardation.
2. in finance, the costs that must be taken into account in analyses involving forecasts.
3. a completely bullsh*t sounding term when you speak it out loud.

For everyday use: 'superb', used in place of the pedestrian 'awesome'

Held in abeyance for the rare, rare occasion when it can be rightfully used: 'quincunx'

Quincunx - noun
An arrangement of five objects, as trees, in a square or rectangle, one at each corner and one in the middle.

Bitch. Both co-workers are acting like it today.

Anthropocene - the geologic era marked by the rise and industrialization of humanity.

There's actually a good debate on whether or not such a thing actually exists.

Demiurge wrote:

Contango
1. pricing situation in which futures prices get progressively higher as maturities get progressively longer, creating negative spreads as contracts go farther out. The increases reflect carrying costs, including storage, financing and insurance. The reverse condition, an inverted market, is termed backwardation.
2. in finance, the costs that must be taken into account in analyses involving forecasts.
3. a completely bullsh*t sounding term when you speak it out loud.

For realz.

While I enjoy a good fifty cent word as much as the next person, my favorite has remained 'waffle'.

Good in and of itself, sublime when repeated quickly five or six times.

No-talent ass-clown
Dumbass

duckilama wrote:

No-talent ass-clown
Dumbass

Ducki, that's inappropriate. "Waffle" is a wonderful word.

duckilama wrote:

No-talent ass-clown
Dumbass

Lost track of tabs, thought those were tag suggestions for Dirt.

I've been a fan of "glib" ever since I was called that in a business meeting. I was apparently simplifying someone's job too much. I would have chosen "logical" to describe what I was doing, but who can correct someone after they use that word?

I've also started to use the verb version of "sire" in conversations relating to the birth of a child. Its important to know your audience though -- too many connotations with quadrupeds.

wordsmythe wrote:
duckilama wrote:

No-talent ass-clown
Dumbass

Lost track of tabs, thought those were tag suggestions for Dirt.

Which reminds me of another one...
Bazinga.

Ruggedizardation

gazonga's

or
Vunderbar!

31,500 vocab for me.

Mine has been penultimate for a while. Always felt that second-to-last is far too unwieldy.