The Joys Of Programming

Bonus_Eruptus wrote:

It's been awhile since I've done relational DB stuff, and I either forgot or never learned that doing an "INSERT INTO table SELECT a,b,c,..." query requires you to list the columns in the table you're inserting into, or it'll just use the columns in defined order, even if the columns you select have names that perfectly match those in the destination table.

We couldn't figure out until now why my positive/negative/neutral review count was rotated one space from the consultant's results, but with 112 distinct genders, this will certainly be the most progressive analytics system in existence, though apparently only for customers with single-digit ages.

Heh, always a fun issue to run into. Working with DBs regularly has always been a good thing in my experience, because you keep rehearsing well-structured statements over and over again. Unless there's an actively compelling reason not to do so, I always start insert statements by writing "INSERT INTO _ () VALUES ()" [or similar] before going back to fill in the column names and values, and I always alias my table names out of habit too. Habits like that are just minor aids but they seem like a bigger win because it takes no conscious effort to summon them.

trueheart78 wrote:
Minase wrote:
So, update on the guild thing. I'm getting close enough to publicly launching that I'm quite terrified. I've created a sort of white paper that defines the problem I'm trying to solve and some of the benefits of sponsorship. If anyone cares to take a look, I always value feedback.

http://www.swcguild.com/whitepapers/...

Problem #1: 404 not found. :D

Case matters: http://www.swcguild.com/whitepapers/swc_sponsorship.pdf

Haha I renamed it last night and forgot to change it here. Sorry about that.

Cyranix wrote:
Bonus_Eruptus wrote:

It's been awhile since I've done relational DB stuff, and I either forgot or never learned that doing an "INSERT INTO table SELECT a,b,c,..." query requires you to list the columns in the table you're inserting into, or it'll just use the columns in defined order, even if the columns you select have names that perfectly match those in the destination table.

We couldn't figure out until now why my positive/negative/neutral review count was rotated one space from the consultant's results, but with 112 distinct genders, this will certainly be the most progressive analytics system in existence, though apparently only for customers with single-digit ages.

Heh, always a fun issue to run into. Working with DBs regularly has always been a good thing in my experience, because you keep rehearsing well-structured statements over and over again. Unless there's an actively compelling reason not to do so, I always start insert statements by writing "INSERT INTO _ () VALUES ()" [or similar] before going back to fill in the column names and values, and I always alias my table names out of habit too. Habits like that are just minor aids but they seem like a bigger win because it takes no conscious effort to summon them.

I wish that MS SQL would allow you to write a query the way it is processed so that intellisense wouldn't be so obnoxious.

FROM table
JOINS
WHERE
SELECT
ORDER BY

It becomes very tedious at work when people try to shove their C++ concepts into python. :/

ImageMagick and rmagick can both go and die and a fire.

That is all.

RolandofGilead wrote:
*Legion* wrote:
boogle wrote:
bandit0013 wrote:

I saw something today that stackoverflow is the #1 source of documentation as far as people's search preferences.

It is a large portion of how I learned to code and how I learned how python works.

Boogle's post closed as Not Constructive.

Oh God I hate reading that, especially when I google a subject and find exactly what I want on Stack Overflow only to have my knowledge acquisition thwarted by some wanna-be software engineer with a god complex and a tiny dick. Who are the jackasses who close down questions all the time? They should not be allowed to ruin perfectly good discussions.

StackOverflow is prime for someone else to swoop in and replace them, the way they replaced Experts Exchange.

SO has a huge body of content, so it won't be easy, but they have systematically destroyed all senses of community.

*Legion* wrote:

StackOverflow is prime for someone else to swoop in and replace them, the way they replaced Experts Exchange.

Agreed. So when can we look forward to LegionAnswers?

trueheart78 wrote:
*Legion* wrote:

StackOverflow is prime for someone else to swoop in and replace them, the way they replaced Experts Exchange.

Agreed. So when can we look forward to LegionAnswers?

That's actually a catchy name.

We are legion..

Was Experts Exchange the one that charged money?

SixteenBlue wrote:

Was Experts Exchange the one that charged money?

Yes, and you had to scroll all the way down to see the accepted answer if you didn't pay them their ransom...

trueheart78 wrote:
SixteenBlue wrote:

Was Experts Exchange the one that charged money?

Yes, and you had to scroll all the way down to see the accepted answer if you didn't pay them their ransom...

Hmm, the one I'm thinking of you had to pay to see the answers, period.

SixteenBlue wrote:
trueheart78 wrote:
SixteenBlue wrote:

Was Experts Exchange the one that charged money?

Yes, and you had to scroll all the way down to see the accepted answer if you didn't pay them their ransom...

Hmm, the one I'm thinking of you had to pay to see the answers, period.

Ah, well, if you didn't know about the scrolling down thing, then it may still have been the same site.

trueheart78 wrote:
SixteenBlue wrote:
trueheart78 wrote:
SixteenBlue wrote:

Was Experts Exchange the one that charged money?

Yes, and you had to scroll all the way down to see the accepted answer if you didn't pay them their ransom...

Hmm, the one I'm thinking of you had to pay to see the answers, period.

Ah, well, if you didn't know about the scrolling down thing, then it may still have been the same site.

Seems I remember the last time I went there, nothing was displayed without pay. Then again, I blocked them in my google search results. Along with BigResource and the other scrapers.

But yeah, I have noticed that SO has some folks around that love to close things they think are beneath them. gamedev.stackexchange used to be full of that. I get the desire to keep from being flooded with "What language should I learn to make an MMO? I've never programmed!", but the responses are often just rude.

trueheart78 wrote:
SixteenBlue wrote:
trueheart78 wrote:
SixteenBlue wrote:

Was Experts Exchange the one that charged money?

Yes, and you had to scroll all the way down to see the accepted answer if you didn't pay them their ransom...

Hmm, the one I'm thinking of you had to pay to see the answers, period.

Ah, well, if you didn't know about the scrolling down thing, then it may still have been the same site.

Yeah, Expert Sex Change had two versions of their site, one for Google to crawl, that had most of the answers exposed if your referrer was Google, and one that blurred everything if you typed in their URL.

Classy.

People need to stop seeing a screw and thinking "f*ck yeah I can use my hammer on this, it worked in the past!"
Assess yourself before you wreck yourself.

boogle wrote:

People need to stop seeing a screw and thinking "f*ck yeah I can use my hammer on this, it worked in the past!"
Assess yourself before you wreck yourself.

SERIOUSLY CANNOT AGREE MORE.

Pffft, a screw is just a nail that hasn't met the right hammer

SixteenBlue wrote:
boogle wrote:

People need to stop seeing a screw and thinking "f*ck yeah I can use my hammer on this, it worked in the past!"
Assess yourself before you wreck yourself.

SERIOUSLY CANNOT AGREE MORE.

The real question is whether the golden hammer or not invented here does more damage.

bandit0013 wrote:
SixteenBlue wrote:
boogle wrote:

People need to stop seeing a screw and thinking "f*ck yeah I can use my hammer on this, it worked in the past!"
Assess yourself before you wreck yourself.

SERIOUSLY CANNOT AGREE MORE.

The real question is whether the golden hammer or not invented here does more damage.

Not really sure, but I do know that they can combine into something really ugly when the golden hammer was invented here.

Strip the threading off the screw and it becomes a nail.

Elegant solution!

Quintin_Stone wrote:

Strip the threading off the screw and it becomes a nail.

Elegant solution!

Or hit it hard enough.

These metaphors are far too close to my reality.

boogle wrote:

People need to stop seeing a screw and thinking "f*ck yeah I can use my hammer on this, it worked in the past!"
Assess yourself before you wreck yourself.

"In computer science, as in many other fields, we see too many people searching for a problem to apply their pet solution to." -- Bjarne Stroustrup

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1...

How is that not a valid question, it received 8 answers you giant tool Bill the Lizard.

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or specific expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, see the FAQ for guidance.

They don't really understand how humans communicate ideas to one another do they?
It seems they have a really narrow view of "question"? If that's the only kind of questions they want, I might as well use google, because SO becomes a mere repository for bits and pieces of documentation that can obviously be found somewhere else.

Whoah:

but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion.

Oh, no, not extended discussion. People might learn something! You might get junior programmers turning into seniors, and we can't have that happen.

trueheart78 wrote:
Minase wrote:
Quote:
So, update on the guild thing. I'm getting close enough to publicly launching that I'm quite terrified. I've created a sort of white paper that defines the problem I'm trying to solve and some of the benefits of sponsorship. If anyone cares to take a look, I always value feedback.
http://www.swcguild.com/whitepapers/...

Problem #1: 404 not found.

Case matters: http://www.swcguild.com/whitepapers/...

Haha I renamed it last night and forgot to change it here. Sorry about that.

So right off the bat, and I hate to be 'that guy', but there isn't any "talent shortage". There's a talent shortage of people who are willing to work for low pay and not have the ability to leave their job. See this, this and other resources.

It may miss your intended audience, but you also might want to mention the sorry state of our H1B program, the hassles and costs of hiring these workers, etc. as additional benefits to your program.

I like the CS degree section. While I've seen that CS degrees can offer a higher performance ceiling, they by no means impose a floor.

So one thing I'm not certain of is if the 'instructors' are going to be paid or not. It looks like you're going to be relying on volunteers... it could work, but I think it's going to be a tough model to replicate.

Overall, I think this is a great idea and if such a thing existed in my area, I would certainly look into it were I hiring. I bet if you crunched the numbers a bit more, you could do a direct dollar comparison of the cost of hiring a new development team vs. sponsoring a cohort. I can kind of derive that from your chart above, but it would be easier for me if you just showed me the numbers directly.

Minase wrote:

So right off the bat, and I hate to be 'that guy', but there isn't any "talent shortage". There's a talent shortage of people who are willing to work for low pay and not have the ability to leave their job.

All the interviews I gave last year say otherwise. It is shocking how many people have 15 years of experience and can't do simple problems let alone difficult ones. I do grant that the issue isn't local talent vs foriegn talent as I have seen the problem with people on H1Bs just as much as US citizens. I don't think the problem is that these people are not capable. I think it is because companies don't create an environment to foster learning. There is no mentorship program put in place so new software developers can learn from experienced ones. In a sense we are experiencing the movie Idiocracy where the average ability of a software developer is not what it used to be.

Malor wrote:

Whoah:

but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion.

Oh, no, not extended discussion. People might learn something! You might get junior programmers turning into seniors, and we can't have that happen.

Worst of all that question doesn't even start a discussion, he just gets several straight reasonable answers to his question.

Ok, I want to formally learn C. I've got experience with C++, although that's from 3 semesters in college (circa 2004).

I've always wanted to get closer to the hardware, and after using Linux as much as I have, I'd like to focus on learning it.

Are there any references, whether books, online guides, etc, that can take me deep into the rabbit hole? Something not too try, preferably.