The Joys Of Programming

DanB wrote:
Mixolyde wrote:
charlemagne wrote:
Mixolyde wrote:

I enjoy writing tests around other people's code and then showing them all the bugs they left in.

You are an agent of chaos.

Kind of the opposite, really. Find and prune dead code, fix bugs, and ensure they don't come back. I increase stability. Bad bosses hate me because I reduce the number of fires they have to put out.

I worked with a guy some years ago who maintained his productivity should be measured by the number of lines he removed from the code base

For legacy code, that's not an awful metric.

lunchbox12682 wrote:
DanB wrote:
Mixolyde wrote:
charlemagne wrote:
Mixolyde wrote:

I enjoy writing tests around other people's code and then showing them all the bugs they left in.

You are an agent of chaos.

Kind of the opposite, really. Find and prune dead code, fix bugs, and ensure they don't come back. I increase stability. Bad bosses hate me because I reduce the number of fires they have to put out.

I worked with a guy some years ago who maintained his productivity should be measured by the number of lines he removed from the code base

For legacy code, that's not an awful metric.

All code is legacy code, but it is a good metric as long as you've adequately covered it with tests.

Mixolyde wrote:
charlemagne wrote:
Mixolyde wrote:

I enjoy writing tests around other people's code and then showing them all the bugs they left in.

You are an agent of chaos.

Kind of the opposite, really. Find and prune dead code, fix bugs, and ensure they don't come back. I increase stability. Bad bosses hate me because I reduce the number of fires they have to put out.

Oh yeah for sure! I can imagine some devs don't appreciate it, unfortunately.

We always wanna see more red than green on those pre deploy Pull Requests. The day Elasticsearch died in our behemoth was a good day.

I have a chance to go to a different company who uses Angular (not AJS) for front end and Java for all back end. I'm a very good .Net developer but my exposure to Java is making 2 small mods to Minecraft back before modloaders were a thing.

They'll hire me without the Java experience if I choose to go there, but I think I would like to be able to speak the "language", as they say.

Do you guys know of a Java course that would be good for me to run through that is tailored to a Sr. Dev?

-BEP

Going from (presumably) C# to Java is not about the language, at least it hasn't been since Java 8 (ok, you'll use -> instead of => for your closures, and get used to String instead of string. There, you're a Java dev now). The bigger switch is going from there being an "according to Hoyle" way of doing things to an absolute explosion of libraries offering to do similar things at every single level of the stack, right down to how you represent time.

If you're going to a place where a lot of decisions have already been made about the stack, and there's a good body of existing source code, you'll have an easy transition from the .Net world, and you won't need a book. If those decisions haven't already been made and they're looking to you to make them, then no book is going to help.