GOG is gone (Ha, NOT!)

Uh oh, RPS posted an article about this, now the WHOLE WORLD knows!!!

garion333 wrote:

Uh oh, RPS posted an article about this, now the WHOLE WORLD knows!!! :P

The difference this time is that there are no servers to overload!

I liked the service, but if this is really a marketing stunt I would have to seriously question any future purchases there.

Doesn't seem like much of a marketing stunt.

Maybe valve bought them and it'll become a subset of Steam.

Vrikk wrote:

If they are:

a.) closing up for good then I am pissed since there was no mention of it. No "WE ARE GOING OUT OF BUSINESS SALE!" to the people that routinely check their site? There were at least a half dozen games I wanted but just didn't have the time to get to.

If it's a legal thing, they probably couldn't give notice at all.

Maybe we'll know in a few days but if they're retooling the site, it's a terrible marketing ploy.

garion333 wrote:

Edit: Oh, and Adrian Werner is that guy who has the blog all about PC games.

Oh, well that narrows it down to about a million people.

Thinking about it a little more, this is the kind of thing that really worries me about digital distribution. Someone goes belly up overnight and poof, no more games.

Hmmm, somethings Up!

Maybe. Be a real shame if this was the case... although I would love it if Steam had 'bought' the service...

Hockosi wrote:

Maybe valve bought them and it'll become a subset of Steam.

They haven't, but I guarantee that Valve will be checking into it.

clever id wrote:

Thinking about it a little more, this is the kind of thing that really worries me about digital distribution. Someone goes belly up overnight and poof, no more games.

At least in this case there are no authentication servers. If you bought a game and you still have a copy then this is really the best worst case scenario for digital distribution.

Only someone like Michael Scott could pull this off

IMAGE(http://www.reviewon.com/images/MichaelScott.jpg)

(and think of something that dumb for a publicity stunt)

I can't believe that this is a stunt. No one could be that stupid,... surely?

I suspect that there was some legal wrangling of sorts taking place and a deadline hit yesterday. The fact that there was no public hint was probably a result of them hoping to prevent it happening and/or part of the legal process.

I seem to recall them saying from day one that if the service ever ended they would allow people to download their purchased games, and judging by the site they have recommitted to that.

Interested to see what plays out in the next few days.

They'd have to try really hard to go out of business. How many costs can they have, exactly?

If it is a marketing stunt, they should have thought it through. A lot of people in the industry have just lost their jobs from businesses collapsing.

Caddrel wrote:

They'd have to try really hard to go out of business. How many costs can they have, exactly?

Mmm.. dunno, they do patch them for modern systems, it`s also hard to tell what kinds of agreements the owners of IP are forcing (fixed fee? percentage?), there are bandwidth costs which most people seem to ignore, administration. There are definitely costs, just hard to tell how big.

And the reasons not to buy digital content continue.....

Lard wrote:

And the reasons not to buy digital content continue.....

The weird thing is, as a publicity stunt, this could be CD Projekt saying "This is why DRM is bad", as in, pointing at services with online authentication.

I don't think too many people are up the spout from this really, if anything it's like standing outside a closed up retail shop saying "and the reasons not to buy from brick and mortar continue...". Anyone can go out of business or close down a shop, it's what happens afterwards with your purchase that matters. A game from GOG is like buying a toaster, if the shop closes then it'll still work, just that you can't get warranty/guarantee on it any more. Most DD games are more like a cable subscription, without the provider there's no service in the future, and past 'purchases' you've 'recorded' may or may not work.

If anything events like this should remind people to make informed buying decisions. GOG is about as safe as buying a physical disc version, just without the disc. Like with having a disc version you have to keep your download backed up for events like this.

A quick general question, with all the download services and games you've bought on them, how many of you backup the games in a way that doesn't require the service to restore them (for example, an archive of the game files as opposed to steam's own backup or the setup files with an online check), versus downloading the game each time you want a play?

Scratched wrote:

A quick general question, with all the download services and games you've bought on them, how many of you backup the games in a way that doesn't require the service to restore them (for example, an archive of the game files as opposed to steam's own backup or the setup files with an online check), versus downloading the game each time you want a play?

I manually back up all my steam games via copying their folders. However, i know none of them will work without steam (i presume there are steam cracks out there) but i make a point of never paying more than around £5-10 for a DRMed game so while i'd be upset at the loss of something i'd paid for i still make purchases based on the reasoning that it's just the cost of going to see a movie (or a cheap night out) and i'm happy to lose that money.

The games i own on GoG (that i had downloaded) are all backed up somewhere and will work. The games i own on Impulse (or totalgaming as it was called) all are on disc and work without the services... with the exception of the Sins expansions but i can buy them on disc if needed.

I don't back them up. Way too much hassle. Then again, I haven't bought anything at anything close to full retail price, so it doesn't seem like it's so much money if I did lose them (not that I wouldn't be pissed).

Lard wrote:

And the reasons not to buy digital content continue.....

This is not a reason not to buy digital content.

1) There was no "physical media" alternative of buying the stuff on GOG.com, unless you wanted to pay 10 times the price on ebay. The whole point of the site was to sell out-of-print games that they can't even sell at brick and mortar stores. There was no other way of delivering the content. So when the choice is between digital content and nothing, you'd rather have nothing?

2) You could and likely still will be able to make your own physical media version of the digital content. Because there was no DRM, you can burn the data onto a dvd ad infinitum. Hell, if you wanted you could paint a little cardboard box, put the dvd inside, and print off a copy of the PDF manual if that made you feel better.

If Steam went under removing access to all games, that required authentication servers and that you could have bought at a store, then yes, it would be a reason to buy digital content. This isn't it.

Lard wrote:

And the reasons not to buy digital content continue.....

You couldn't be more wrong - it's precisely the opposite. This is the perfect example of proper digital distribution failing correctly. Even if GoG.com has failed and gone out of business, none of their customers have lost anything as long as they still have the games - because, and only because, the games are DRM-free.

I would like to see Steam remove the DRM on games after X years of being released. This would allow people to back up the games to DVD or something and archive them.

TheGameguru wrote:

I would like to see Steam remove the DRM on games after X years of being released. This would allow people to back up the games to DVD or something and archive them.

I suppose the bottom line is it's all down to contracts, but I guess the same rule applies to DRM on old titles as it does to piracy of new titles: Some people will buy anyway, and some will pirate anyway. Valve's principle has been to treat your customers well, so it would be workable that the files for a game are managed in the same way as any other, but once downloaded don't require authentication.

Aetius wrote:
Lard wrote:

And the reasons not to buy digital content continue.....

You couldn't be more wrong - it's precisely the opposite. This is the perfect example of proper digital distribution failing correctly. Even if GoG.com has failed and gone out of business, none of their customers have lost anything as long as they still have the games - because, and only because, the games are DRM-free.

Correct, and they will implement a redownload solution for customers, stunt or not.

I doubt there are any retail stores out there that will replace your lost or damaged disc for free a year after purchase.

Lard wrote:

And the reasons not to buy digital content continue.....

Not really. This is only a problem for me because I had failed to back up all my installers. That was my error; not GoG's. If I had kept them then I wouldn't have a problem at all; I could continue to reinstall my games until an OS upgrade somewhere along the line broke them again, but that problem would exist even with physical media.

What this is a caveat against is the "cloud". Essentially by not backing up my installers I was using GoG as cloud storage for them. (Why bother to download; I can always get them from GoG again if I need to.) Depending on a third party to keep your data for you is apparently the bad idea here.

(And, yes, I know they say they are going to give the opportunity to re-download. I just hope it's the same versions as before and not some newly DRMed version.)

This is horrible timing, they just released Age of Wonders and announced the excellent AoW:Shadow Magic. I don't know about some of you but I played the hell out of these games. Might & Magic, Disciples, the Descent series, Freelancer. It's a long list. Damn torrenters.

tanstaafl wrote:
Lard wrote:

And the reasons not to buy digital content continue.....

Not really. This is only a problem for me because I had failed to back up all my installers. That was my error; not GoG's. If I had kept them then I wouldn't have a problem at all; I could continue to reinstall my games until an OS upgrade somewhere along the line broke them again, but that problem would exist even with physical media.

What this is a caveat against is the "cloud". Essentially by not backing up my installers I was using GoG as cloud storage for them. (Why bother to download; I can always get them from GoG again if I need to.) Depending on a third party to keep your data for you is apparently the bad idea here.

(And, yes, I know they say they are going to give the opportunity to re-download. I just hope it's the same versions as before and not some newly DRMed version.)

I guess this is when people should realise what they're paying for.

With GOG I guess it's like buying a toaster and the store saying you can pick it up any time you like, except they might go out of business at some point in the future and you can't pick up your toaster any more.

With 'traditional' DD/online DRM I'd say it's more similar to paying for a subscription, but it's a one-off payment. Valve calls each purchase on steam a subscription.

Ug...

I just went though and deleted 10 or so games from GOG for space reasons. That means I have like 20 games to download.

Stunt or not even if GOG comes back I seriously doubt I would every invest another dollar with them.

Sounds like a marketing ploy to me. I envision an upgraded site with either extra costs and/or extra benefits, but definitely something that will make give your credit card number to them.

As opposed to the marketing ploy that makes their customers lose their trust in the company...

If they had put out a notice last month saying "We're going to have four days of downtime from 19th to 23rd September, and we'll be back with an improved website and service", no one would be concerned and everyone would be wondering how their new service was going to be improved.

Positive versus negative.