Kick-Ass: Movie Catch All

Going to see it now. Will have quickie-review by non-comic reader soon.

Kick-Ass is incredible. Anyone who likes gratuitous violence mixed with humour in a very tongue-in-cheek Superhero parody should watch this immediately.

But warning, this is not a kids movie.

Just got back. I really liked this movie. If you grew up on superhero cartoons, comics, or movies, this movie hits all of the right notes. I was most surprised at how funny the movie is. Hit Girl is just a blast, and she swears like a sailor.

I think what works best is that by knowing so much about super heroes, you do not need some deep exposition on motivation: His wife died, he was a nerdy kid looking to act out, this person was drafted into it, etc. So you just get to look and enjoy what these characters are doing, rather than big flashbacks to their tragic past.

The film is like one big french kiss to anyone who loves super heroes.

It has plenty of action and is hilarious as well; but that's NOT A f*ckING BAZOOKA!

I really enjoyed it, my wife did not. The only parts that really felt off was the whole girlfriend relationship angle. It didn't even really have a purpose in the movie as far as I could tell. Nic Cage was GREAT! His stilted adam-west style dialog was so much fun. I wish there was more Big Daddy/Hit Girl stuff, but it was a fairly satisfying superhero flick.

Just got back from the movie. So... f*cking... awesome. I'm no movie critic so no review here. I'll just say that I highly recommend it as long as you don't mind graphic violence. Hit Girl owns this movie.

I only watch a movie at the theater about twice a year, and I'm glad the trailer for this convinced me to make the trip. Kick Ass delivers. I liked it so much, I'll probably buy the DVD, which is also something I rarely do (I own less than 10 movie DVDs).

Doug wrote:

But warning, this is not a kids movie.

Since when do people think a rated R movie is for kids?

There were kids at both this, and Watchmen, and 300. Now, I will not parent. My dad took me to a lot of movies that were not age appropriate for a kid, both R and PG 13 flicks. o paraphrase Kevin Smith, my dad took me[and my brother] to the movies he(my dad) wanted to see.

But I cannot help but think some parent sees comic book and thinks it will be some Disney affair like Spiderman or X-men.

And I have to say, a big part of the conceit of this IP is warping the typical Saturday morning style super hero. On its face, that is just what it looks like.

I have to say a big part of the issue is that Rated R films need to rely on rating to convey this information. The juicy bits cannot be shown in a trailer. If you could see Rorschach cleave a serial killer's head in twain, you might rethink taking your 9 year old.

Fantastic movie. Didn't go the way I thought it was and I thought that was great.

Excellent movie. Two thumb-stumps up.

Any chance we could get the thread retitled as a catch-all?

Saw it earlier tonight and enjoyed it greatly. Most fun I've had at a superhero movie since Mystery Men.

Thoroughly entertaining flick. I really like how they took comic book obsession to it's natural conclusion. It's a credit to the movie that even when scenes from the trailer came up, it seemed fresh and new. Anyway, an awesome surprise, and Nick Cage's best work since I can remember.

Just got back from my second viewing; was lucky to see it at work last Friday. Still shocking and great the second time.

One of the few movies where the crowd can really add to the experience, too. Even if you normally wait for video releases, it's worth it to watch in a crowded theater.

I absolutely loved this movie. It was so much more raunchy and violent than I had anticipated, but I loved every minute of it.

Hit-Girl stole the show, and I actually liked Nicolas Cage for the first time in years.

I absolutely loved it. Matthew Vaughn did a great job with this. The cast was one step beyond great. It had some really nice touches in it for us comic geeks.

Just got back from seeing this. The guy next to me was sort of a jerk but other than that it was a pretty great movie.

Pex-Corrh wrote:

One of the few movies where the crowd can really add to the experience, too. Even if you normally wait for video releases, it's worth it to watch in a crowded theater.

I agree with you on that. I think it is telling that I went to a 10:30 showing on Saturday, and the theater was still 2/3 full. I do not know what it is, but laughing with the crowd just feels so much better than laughing with your family only, or laughing alone.

Pex-Corrh wrote:

One of the few movies where the crowd can really add to the experience, too. Even if you normally wait for video releases, it's worth it to watch in a crowded theater.

I agree with you on that. I think it is telling that I went to a 10:30 showing on Saturday, and the theater was still 2/3 full. I do not know what it is, but laughing with the crowd just feels so much better than laughing with your family only, or laughing alone.

Also, I finally saw thanks to IMDB where Matthew Vaughn was familiar to me. He also directed Layer Cake; just a fantastic movie starring Daniel Craig, major support by Colm Meaney(Chief O'Brien on DS9). And that movie also featured hardcore and brutal violence. Vaughn knows how to show someone get the ever living sh*t kicked out of them.

I thought Stardust was an underrated movie too. It is, I think, a slow burn. You tend not to find it that awesome the first time you see it, but the switching tone was well-handled and it has strong central performances and a commendable lack of cheese.

In the gym today I saw that one of those news channels was doing the expected "oh noes the children" stories, focusing on Hit Girl of course.

Dyni wrote:

I actually liked Nicolas Cage for the first time in years.

Yeah, I think the last time I enjoyed his acting so much was the opening sequence of Face/Off. (That and the Fu Manchu bit in the Grindhouse trailers, but I'm not sure if that really counts. :))

They really need to give him more opportunities to play a comedic/manic psychopath. His good-guy characters are never as fun to watch. I'm sure it's at least partly a function of the roles themselves, since villains are usually more fun than the hero, but Nic Cage seems to take it to extremes. Face/Off was actually a pretty good example of that: Travolta did both roles pretty well, but Cage was much better as the villain than as the hero.

Dyni wrote:

I actually liked Nicolas Cage for the first time in years.

Completely this, he was excellent.

I haven't felt so thouroughly entertained by a movie in a while. Big smiles all around whilst walking out of the theatre and I would have been happy to walk straight back in and see it again. That never happens with me.

The movie kicked ass. I liked Big Daddy the best of all the characters, particularly because the character knows he's ripping off on Batman, and he's probably doing it precisely so no one ever believes anyone who sees him.

Nice.

LarryC wrote:

The movie kicked ass. I liked Big Daddy the best of all the characters, particularly because the character knows he's ripping off on Batman, and he's probably doing it precisely so no one ever believes anyone who sees him.

Nice.

*smacks forehead* I thought it was just an affectionate dig at Batman, but that actually makes a lot more sense given the movie's attitude towards superhero tropes.

Yeah, the scene with his old partner was quite telling. He's making it a game for his daughter while screwing with everyone he ever rips off. I like his sudden switch to very serious as well.

Sonicator wrote:
LarryC wrote:

The movie kicked ass. I liked Big Daddy the best of all the characters, particularly because the character knows he's ripping off on Batman, and he's probably doing it precisely so no one ever believes anyone who sees him.

Nice.

*smacks forehead* I thought it was just an affectionate dig at Batman, but that actually makes a lot more sense given the movie's attitude towards superhero tropes.

I can't believe I didn't make that connection either...

In the Empire interview, Cage said that he decided that Adam West-era Batman is Big Daddy's muse, and he's channelling West (which is why he talks like West). It wasn't what Vaughn and Goldman intended (I think they intended what LarryC suggested), but it's how Cage made sense of the character.

Nicolas Cage was at the Wondercon Kick-Ass panel and talks about how he chose Big Daddy's personality. It's on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwnYC..., and the question is answered at 9:10.

The entire panel was very interesting, but I can't recommend watching it if you haven't seen the movie yet. It spoils two big plot points.

Something I'm wondering about, from anyone who has both read the comic and watched the movie (I have done neither):

I was curious about this so I hit Wikipedia and read the plot summary of the comic. It seems really depressing. Does the synopsis not do the tone of the comic justice? Or did they change the tone between comic and movie, making the movie more fun and funny? Or are the trailers and reviews of the movie ignoring a depressing undertone?

Whatever it is, I felt like there was a tonal split between the story of the comic as I read it, and the movie ostensibly being advertised.

NathanialG wrote:

Just got back from seeing this. The guy next to me was sort of a jerk but other than that it was a pretty great movie.

That's no way to talk about my roommate's girlfriend... Oh... you meant me? Pistols at dawn, sir! Pistols at dawn!

kaostheory wrote:
NathanialG wrote:

Just got back from seeing this. The guy next to me was sort of a jerk but other than that it was a pretty great movie.

That's no way to talk about my roommate's girlfriend... Oh... you meant me? Pistols at dawn, sir! Pistols at dawn!

=)