Resonance of Fate (X360/PS3)

It's obviously an SMG with 8 sights and 3 barrels. Obviously.

I've been playing through this. I'm up to chapter 8 or 9 at this point. The storytelling is a little off, but the characters are fun, and the battle system is unique, and playing dress-up and customizing the guns are both hard to resist.

Also, poison damage is bloody terrifying in this game. I'm having trouble coming up with a more brutal status ailment to deal with ever in an RPG.

Did you other folks end up finishing this? I recently started (I'm on Chapter 2 now).

I'm terrible at it. I understand it pretty well; I just haven't got the strategy down. Had horrible problems with the Chapter 1 story mission because I didn't realize I could jump during my hero action to get to a higher level or go over a barrier. I also only just realized how precious and limited special ammo is (at least until I hit a point where I can grind a lot of scrap metal), and haven't fully wrapped my head around gauge breaking versus "real" damage. Gonna have to break out the strategy guide for this one.

When in doubt, though, grind. I hit the arena and brought everybody to level five in their primary weapon and the guys a few levels in their secondary. (It seems like Leanne can't equip anything but her starting weapon, though... I'm only realizing now it might be a weight issue?) Got sufficient gold to slap everything I could fit on my weapons. I always liked that RPGs would let me trade in patience what I lack in intelligence. Speaking of the arena, is there any use for the soft serve ice cream they sell and let you equip?

I didn't finish it yet (been meaning to), but the way it works is that some weapons do scratch damage and some do real damage. Scratch damage shows up as blue and will heal at the end of the round, but doing any real damage will convert all scratch damage to deal damage. In other words, what you want to do is have your SMG character roll through and do a ton of scratch damage, then a pistol character tag the same enemy to make the damage stick.

And yes, Leanne's problem sounds like a weight issue. Once you get to a high enough level you can actually equip a character with two guns, either to make them more flexible (pistol and SMG) or to deal more damage (twin SMG).

I couldn't tell you about the ice cream. It's been too long.

I finished it, and a NG+. I learned a lot along the way.

Here's the deal: combat in this game is incredible, but wickedly hard when you're still learning it. To make things worse, it's tougher when you only have 3-4 bezels, as you do at the beginning of the game. I think I floundered up through chapter 4 or so, at which point I spent some time grinding green hexes (you can bring up a 2x experience node all the way to the coliseum if you use the green "tetris L-block" piece).

The best thing to do early on is specialize everyone in something. Ideally you'll have two SMG users and one pistol-user. The SMG users should "scratch" as much as they can, then the pistol user comes behind them and makes that damage permanent. Scratch damage isn't real, so to speak, until a damage weapon like pistol or grenade hits the gauge. Scratch damage also heals, whereas "real" damage doesn't. Again, this all becomes much easier once you have 7 bezels or so and can make hero runs more of a thing. Remember that when you're low you can regain bezels by dropping the health of a broken gauge below the break line (including multiple bezels for multiple breaks on a single gauge). It's still a bit confusing, but will make more sense in time. Don't feel bad that it's hard at first, though; the game is much easier when you have more options. Well, unless you go to Neverland. But the golden guns are worth it.

Once you start to get some more serious levels in guns (like 20 or more), acceleration % becomes much more important than speed. It doesn't matter if it takes 4 seconds for the first level to fill if you have 200% acceleration, versus a speed of 1 sec but then no accel. (I can't remember the game's term for these).

No, the ice cream doesn't do anything other than be fun. Same with the incredible litany of cool clothes.

Thanks. I do get the scratch damage versus real damage, and actually switched around my characters/weapons so that my SMG wielder goes first and has to cut through the other two with his first hero action; this usually means that my first action gets me scratch and a Resonance point, second action kills the guy with scratch damage and gets another Resonance point, then I can do a Tri-Action (possibly switching to my SMG wielder to shoot first). So simple combat is a breeze. But if I don't take enemies down with the actions, I'm boned; and it's hard to figure out when I'm going to fail to kill somebody.

Minarchist wrote:

Remember that when you're low you can regain bezels by dropping the health of a broken gauge below the break line (including multiple bezels for multiple breaks on a single gauge).

This right here is where you lost me. Everything else I had.

Some enemies have a line on their health bar called a break line. If you can reduce their health below that line, you'll regain a bezel.

beeporama wrote:
Minarchist wrote:

Remember that when you're low you can regain bezels by dropping the health of a broken gauge below the break line (including multiple bezels for multiple breaks on a single gauge).

This right here is where you lost me. Everything else I had.

It's not something you need to worry about too terribly much outside of boss-type battles, but it can save your hide in a pinch. Higher levels of charge on direct-damage weapons will increase your "break %", that is the possibility to inflict a gauge break. This has two effects: First, stunning the enemy (very helpful, and basically necessary for Neverland). Second, "breaking" whatever gauge the bullet hit. This will appear as one or more lines or "breaks" on the health of the gauge that was broken. At higher levels you can break a single gauge 10 times or more!

At any rate, the purpose of the gauge break is also two-fold, both important: (a) If you can drop the actual health of the gauge below the break (not the scratch damage, but the actual health), you will gain back a bezel for every break depleted. That is, if you'd manage to get a gauge broken into six pieces (so five breaks), and you depleted the gauge's health below three of them, you would gain back three bezels. (b) Once taken below a break, a gauge's health can never regenerate past it, forever and ever amen. This doesn't matter much at your level, but will be a big deal in later chapters when regeneration is stupid-fast.

Most lower-level mobs can only have their gauges broken a couple times each, but when you get into high-level critters and boss mobs, you can break them a huge number of times and set up a lot of bezel regains to get you through the fight. Smash grenades, though somewhat difficult to wield, are incredibly effective at gauge breaking. The stun effect of the gauge break is very important, as well, and is the only way to take out some high-level mobs that can send you into critical status on turn 1 (again, mostly in Neverland). Of course, at later levels the SMGs can also stun, so that particular factor isn't as important once you have an SMG wielder at level 100.

Does that make more sense? It's a rather esoteric concept to grasp. I didn't really get it until much later in the game.

Thanks! I understood that enough to put it to use, I think.

Every time I look at this thread, you guys scare me out of playing this game for another month. I'll never open it at this rate!

spider_j wrote:

Every time I look at this thread, you guys scare me out of playing this game for another month. I'll never open it at this rate! :)

But it has Nolan North in it. Whenever you're feeling insecure or scared, sink into Vashyron's comforting, dulcet tones.

Yeah, but he's stuck with raisins for the whole game.

spider_j wrote:

Every time I look at this thread, you guys scare me out of playing this game for another month. I'll never open it at this rate! :)

I did 90% get it just be doing the tutorials and fighting a battle or two. I'm just impatient to MASTER it.

spider_j wrote:

Every time I look at this thread, you guys scare me out of playing this game for another month. I'll never open it at this rate! :)

I've been thinking the same thing. It's been sitting on the shelf for a long time and whenever this thread pops up I consider playing it. Then I start reading the posts and I slowly back away and fire up TF2 again instead.

Aww. Come on guys. Dive in and take the chance. This is one of the good ones.

It's scary because it's unique. Aren't we always asking for unique games that are willing to take a risk?

The game does a good job of teaching you its systems. Give it a shot.

LobsterMobster wrote:

It's scary because it's unique. Aren't we always asking for unique games that are willing to take a risk?

The game does a good job of teaching you its systems. Give it a shot.

You sold me man, just reading all of this and that final statement makes me want to play that much more. If there's one thing I can't stand about the industry these days is that lack of creativity in most mainstream gaming. And unique is great.

I decided to fire it up yesterday for a bit and started going through the tutorials. Even with those I wasn't entirely sure what I was doing. I'm sure it'll start making sense at some point. I do like the look of it so far, though.

Yeah, everyone should play this game for sure. Loads of fun, phenomenal combat system and a very different "look" than we usually think of.

As to the story, think of it as a bunch of little vignettes, almost like a TV show. The stories all tie together loosely, but don't look for some grandiose crazy Final Fantasy plot here. Oh, but if you do want some help trying to figure out what's going on, play a bit and then the next time you boot it up, watch the opening cinematic. Then when it gets to the selection screen, wait. For a minute or so. Then you'll see a different cinematic that ends in a different title select screen. That explains a lot of the backstory that is otherwise unmentioned in the game.

fleabagmatt wrote:

I decided to fire it up yesterday for a bit and started going through the tutorials. Even with those I wasn't entirely sure what I was doing. I'm sure it'll start making sense at some point. I do like the look of it so far, though.

Same with me. After playing a couple combats in the arena, badly, it started to make sense as I tried different things and got a handle on it. Replay those for a while because you'll also grind up a little XP and money while you learn the strategy.

I'm still not GOOD at this game but I'm further getting the hang of it, and finding the combat really addictive. Every time I start up a session I go straight to the arena for a while because it's just so fun.

I'm glad to see more people giving this one a chance. It's one of my favorite games from this generation.

All this chatter has convinced me to put it back on my Amazon wishlist. But considering the size of the pile I need it to be on sale under $20 again.

Stele wrote:

All this chatter has convinced me to put it back on my Amazon wishlist. But considering the size of the pile I need it to be on sale under $20 again.

$15 at NewEgg.

Boom! Busted!

OK, wow, having a great time! I'm just starting the Forest of Idols in chapter 3 and managed to unearth enough shards for a fourth bezel, which sure does make things easier. (So did grinding up my levels, I expect.)

New question: when did you set up Forest off Idols for farming? I can clearly see how easy it is to link a bunch of terminals to it, BUT getting enough gold hexes to activate 120 hexes and turn on the terminals is difficult. Did you switch to a different color? Did you farm them? Do they get easier to find later?

If you're talking about hooking the arena up to both the 1.5x experience node and the 2x effect node (for 3x experience at the arena), I remember farming most of my green L hexes (colored...5? Maybe?) in Chapter five, outside the forest of idols. The "shady thug" enemy is the one you're looking for. Also, once you get past that to chapter 6 or 7 and have access to the tundra, there's a bunch of them down there as well. That's the earliest you can access those hexes.

Aargh! It's gone scary again!

I will play it, and probably very soon. I've been off consoles for a while, playing handheld stuff.

I need to try and get through the tutorials this weekend. Haven't played it since that first sit-down.

beeporama wrote:

OK, wow, having a great time! I'm just starting the Forest of Idols in chapter 3 and managed to unearth enough shards for a fourth bezel, which sure does make things easier. (So did grinding up my levels, I expect.)

New question: when did you set up Forest off Idols for farming? I can clearly see how easy it is to link a bunch of terminals to it, BUT getting enough gold hexes to activate 120 hexes and turn on the terminals is difficult. Did you switch to a different color? Did you farm them? Do they get easier to find later?

That's the area with the gas-tank guys, right? I seem to remember using red C-shaped pieces there at one point, then farming it for more golds. It's a great place to farm, and I like the music.

Hoo man, once the combat system clicks, this game is so addictive. I've managed to activate my first terminal on the arena. Can't wait until colored hexes become more plentiful (I hope they become more plentiful).

I did lots of stupid stuff at first but it's okay. The game is very forgiving. There is a stupid difficulty spike early on (an escort mission where it is very difficult to protect what you are escorting, you really have to wipe out your foes FAST) then it settles in nicely.

I like that judicious use of limited items really do help battle, a good balance between "never need them except maybe boss fights" a la Final Fantasy and "you must constantly fret about resource management" a la Rogue Galaxy. I like that grinding, while unnecessary, is actually fun because battles are so addictive (especially as you learn to exploit various mechanics).

And more games need to let you play dress-up.

This could end up making my personal top ten list.