Post a Picture - Something You Created!

Thanks -- it was my first project with cables. The second scarf uses yarn with the color changes in it, and clever use of short rows to construct the triangles. It was made of a single skein of yarn.

I used free patterns for all those projects:
Irish Hiking Scarf
Multidirectional Diagonal Scarf
Noro Striped Scarf (I didn't use Noro yarn, though.)
Ribbed Baby Hat

That was actually my first thought, but most people don't like to go to the trouble of going shirt rows. It is reason most sock patterns use heel flaps.

Nosferatu wrote:

Stevenmack:
So you've been procreating with your iPad? ew...

Tis a strangely named program indeed :), but of the three I've tried (this, Sketchbook Pro and Inspire Pro) it's definitely my favorite.

I think I might have to pick up a copy of that book for my older brother, he is an ex Navy Nuke as well.

Katy wrote:

The scarves are gifts for my brother and his family in Chicago.

Why? Does it get cold here?

wordsmythe wrote:
Katy wrote:

The scarves are gifts for my brother and his family in Chicago.

Why? Does it get cold here?

For those of us without beards, yes.

wordsmythe wrote:
Katy wrote:

The scarves are gifts for my brother and his family in Chicago.

Why? Does it get cold here?

I heard a rumor that it does. And my poor sister and law still hasn't acclimated. (She's from Brazil.)

My son is making a castle for a school group project. He got tasked with making some sort of base for it. Apparently he was supposed to paint a piece of cardboard. My boy? I don't think so.

So we put this together:
IMAGE(http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a254/Liquidmantis/terrain.jpg)

That's awesome LiquidMantis!

LiquidMantis wrote:

My son is making a castle for a school group project. He got tasked with making some sort of base for it. Apparently he was supposed to paint a piece of cardboard. My boy? I don't think so.

So we put this together:

What's it made of and how did you do it?

Thanks, Tuff!

The technique is explained in detail here on the Hirst Arts site. The actual method is about 2/3rds of the way down.

It's two stacks of 2" pink foamboard insulation. I rough cut it with a Foam Factory hotwire foam cutter, but it's easily doable with a bread knife as shown in the Hirst Arts guide. Then we cut the rock fissures by making random vertical cuts with an exacto knife to remove pieces. After that, we made the same thing in tighter horizontal cuts. To get the chunk look we then rubbed it with hands and fingers to remove the loose chunk and break off the foam.

The paint is a three stage layering process. I airbrushed the dark grey on to get it down into all the crevices. The medium gray is brushed on with a only mildly wet brush. There's a light grey layer that is drybrushed on last, but it doesn't show in the picture very much. It's really more of an effect than a color layer. This is well described with photos on the Hirst Arts site too.

I sifted dirt from the back yard through a fine colander for the dirt. We just brushed on thinned white glue and then poured it round. The grass is just model supply grass available at miniatures gaming shops or hobby stores that carry model railroading stuff. It's applied with the same brushed on thinned glue method. The shrubbery I made by blending up soft foam with a mix of green paint but it's also available like the grass. It's just called "ground foam" I believe.

The base is just 1/4" MDF that I traced the rough outline of the terrain onto and cut out with a reciprocating saw and "broke" the edge with a foam sanding block. Then I rubbed a walnut brown stain on the rim of it before gluing it to the piece.

LiquidMantis wrote:

Thanks, Tuff!

The technique is explained in detail here on the Hirst Arts site. The actual method is about 2/3rds of the way down.

It's two stacks of 2" pink foamboard insulation. I rough cut it with a Foam Factory hotwire foam cutter, but it's easily doable with a bread knife as shown in the Hirst Arts guide. Then we cut the rock fissures by making random vertical cuts with an exacto knife to remove pieces. After that, we made the same thing in tighter horizontal cuts. To get the chunk look we then rubbed it with hands and fingers to remove the loose chunk and break off the foam.

The paint is a three stage layering process. I airbrushed the dark grey on to get it down into all the crevices. The medium gray is brushed on with a only mildly wet brush. There's a light grey layer that is drybrushed on last, but it doesn't show in the picture very much. It's really more of an effect than a color layer. This is well described with photos on the Hirst Arts site too.

I sifted dirt from the back yard through a fine colander for the dirt. We just brushed on thinned white glue and then poured it round. The grass is just model supply grass available at miniatures gaming shops or hobby stores that carry model railroading stuff. It's applied with the same brushed on thinned glue method. The shrubbery I made by blending up soft foam with a mix of green paint but it's also available like the grass. It's just called "ground foam" I believe.

The base is just 1/4" MDF that I traced the rough outline of the terrain onto and cut out with a reciprocating saw and "broke" the edge with a foam sanding block. Then I rubbed a walnut brown stain on the rim of it before gluing it to the piece.

...and this is your son's project? Awesome work!!

That is definitely awesome son of LiquidMantis.

Oh my, if he ever gets into Warhammer, he is going to be the envy of every opponent!

Heck, he may even make some side cash from solicited work at the tournaments.

KEA_Lightning wrote:

...and this is your son's project? Awesome work!!

Admittedly I had a heavy involvement, but I kept switching between "I" and "we" in that post just through stream-of-consciousness faulty writing. Short of the MDF base, my son was involved with all the steps too. He definitely needs airbrush practice though. The main reason for doing this is that I was hoping to inspire him to want to build things and do things for himself like my dad always did with me. He had a lot of fun doing this and wants to do more. My younger son was really into it as well and is insistent that we do something similar together. Thankfully our basement is the family game room as storage will quickly become an issue!

We need to wipe up the base in front of the ramp. It has a lot of dust on it right now from the dirt gluing and pour off.

I bet he can't wait for the rest of the kids put their crappy castle on that!

Damn, wish I had the room to make stuff like that.
And the money.
And the time.
And the skill.
And the..(you get the idea).

*
More ipad paintery practice:

IMAGE(http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i183/stevenmack/ipad2.jpg)

fore reference original source pic was taken randomly from deviantart (http://thisgirlhasissues.deviantart.com/ specifically) although it ended up not looking much like the source pic really...Also still can't quite figure out hair.

Doing hair in chunks looks more natural than trying to do it in strands.

Amoebic wrote:

Doing hair in chunks looks more natural than trying to do it in strands.

That's normally the way I do it with pencils - for some reason replicating that digitally is giving me problems. Probably just need to take my time a bit more...I always get bored doing hair and start rushing it.

IMAGE(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vDnp-TRfx3s/TqvfIOMeiHI/AAAAAAAACFo/kthYDsRRn5Y/s1600/spacecuit_scott_benson_small.png)

Mittens!

IMAGE(http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/7934/mittensa.png)

Katy wrote:

Mittens!

How long did those take you? What size needles?

I forget that you want details of these things.

I used Wool-Ease (worsted weight), and size 6 needles for the cuffs, and size 7 for the body of the mitten. I started them Monday, worked on them off-and-on all week, and finished this morning. This was my first project working with two colors of yarn at once (one in each hand). I relaxed a bit on the second mitten -- you'll notice that the one on the right is slightly bigger. The one on the left is a bit too small to fit me, so the pair is going to my daughter.

It's a free pattern, SpillyJane's Quo Vadis, available on her blog. I added a few extra rounds to the cuff, and made them in two colors only, instead of the nine colors called for in the pattern, but otherwise made no changes.

I pulled some files of my old iMac yesterday before I wiped it to sell on craigslist. This was from my first year as a graphic design major, specifically in Intro to Photoshop. Our midterm project was to make a movie poster for an upcoming scifi film. This was the first project I did that I was really proud of. It's also kind of cool that a PC game just came out with the a similar plot and the same name of the poster I made three years ago.

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/YmlpXl.jpg)

I made a flash game in a very, very short amount of time for the 0 hour game jam last night:

IMAGE(http://switchbreak.net/Prototypes/SeparatedShip/Screenshot.png)

http://switchbreak.net/Prototypes/Se...

Switchbreak wrote:

I made a flash game in a very, very short amount of time for the 0 hour game jam last night:

IMAGE(http://switchbreak.net/Prototypes/SeparatedShip/Screenshot.png)

http://switchbreak.net/Prototypes/Se...

Wow, that's a fun. hard and, addicting game. Great job!

Katy,
Cool lol I've been working on a pair of socks for almost a year now myself.mostly lack off time and three fact I'm using #2 needles

My brother and a few friends played their first and final gig as a band. They played at a restaurant/bar here in town. It was a pretty good show. We just invited friends and family. I made this poster/invite for them, I was going for kind of strange and moody band poster

IMAGE(http://kalenjohnson.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/one-night-band-e1319694478409.jpg)

This years T-shirt design I illustrated for a fun run that my sis-in-law puts on every winter.

IMAGE(http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6228/6304525441_f8b3f9c4ec_b.jpg)

Switchbreak wrote:

I made a flash game in a very, very short amount of time for the 0 hour game jam last night:

IMAGE(http://switchbreak.net/Prototypes/SeparatedShip/Screenshot.png)

http://switchbreak.net/Prototypes/Se...

Very slick! I found that I didn't expand or contract. I very quickly got knocked down to an optimum size that I got the farthest with. Maybe have the speed of the larger blocks vary depending on your size? Somehow make the size aspect more negotiable.

So, I'm creating a card game. I've got most of the rules down and ordered supplies for making some proto-types. There are going to be about 14 different cards (so 14 designs). I've started with the character cards (of which there are four). Character cards are blue, another group is orange, and the last is red. It won't be all blue and black!

The game is a cross between Cash & Guns and VATS (from Fallout).

IMAGE(http://damontgomery.com/images/character-cards.jpg)

I'm pretty happy with the look right now, but any feedback is appreciated!