Come all ye self-styled chefs and kitchen users, we must talk.

Tanglebones wrote:
sometimesdee wrote:

I got the $130 one, and I love it. I really don't know what the extra $100 gets you.

So far as I can tell from Amazon, it's the use of an induction heating element, rather than whatever the $130 one uses; Zojirushi is saying that it helps with the fuzzy logic, since it can apply the heat from different directions, rather than just bottom-upwards.

Well, the logic is pretty sound. It's just that in practice, I don't think you really need that. The pot is so thick on the $130 one that when you heat just the bottom (there's a contact that's about an inch in diameter) the heat transfer is slow and good enough that it cooks everything evenly. There's a chance that it would cook your rice just as good but more quickly! It takes about 50-60 minutes to cook in the $130.00. If the induction one can get that pot evenly heated more quickly, it might be able to cook your rice in less time. That's all speculation on my part, though.

Blondish83 wrote:
ringsnort wrote:
plavonica wrote:

I have found the missing ingredient in my kielbasa and sauerkraut. Caraway seed. Who knew?

Sauerkraut and kielbasa-style sausage is one of the really great Fall comfort foods. Can't wait to try adding caraway seeds as you suggest.

I typically use cold-packed sauerkraut (those glass jars in the refrigerated section)for every recipe. I was wondering, however, what brand of canned "kraut" you're using?

Carroway seed is one of the central flavors to German and Polish cuisine. Consider adding mustard seed or paprika as well. The are the big 3 when it comes to making my food.

You forgot dill.

wordsmythe wrote:
Blondish83 wrote:
ringsnort wrote:
plavonica wrote:

I have found the missing ingredient in my kielbasa and sauerkraut. Caraway seed. Who knew?

Sauerkraut and kielbasa-style sausage is one of the really great Fall comfort foods. Can't wait to try adding caraway seeds as you suggest.

I typically use cold-packed sauerkraut (those glass jars in the refrigerated section)for every recipe. I was wondering, however, what brand of canned "kraut" you're using?

Carroway seed is one of the central flavors to German and Polish cuisine. Consider adding mustard seed or paprika as well. The are the big 3 when it comes to making my food.

You forgot dill.

True; but you don't want to use dill in a heated dish as it looses it's dill flavor when cooked. Bay Leaves are something I would use if you are looking for a bitter herb taste in your German dish. You could also use Juniper Berries and they are also found in pickling spice so would pair well with the sour kraut. Marjoram is also used in making sausages so it would be good to add to amp up the savory nature of a sausage or potato dish.

Personally I always finish my potato salads that I serve at room temperature with fresh dill and marjoram. It adds a nice green color to the creamy salad and serves as a bitter and tangy counter point to the mayonnaise base.

Cooked dill does have a different flavor, but its useful in it's own right.

It pairs nicely with tarragon and fennel, with a touch of sage or rosemary. Chicken, game-birds, and strongly flavored fish like salmon, smeared with a "pesto" of that, roasted, then served drizzled with lemon juice is AMAZING.

I put garlic hummus on my grilled cheese this afternoon. It was tasty. That's all.

Sister wrote:

I put garlic hummus on my grilled cheese this afternoon. It was tasty. That's all.

Hummus is awesome. I like it with lettuce and tomato on a bagel.

Blondish83 wrote:
wordsmythe wrote:
Blondish83 wrote:
ringsnort wrote:
plavonica wrote:

I have found the missing ingredient in my kielbasa and sauerkraut. Caraway seed. Who knew?

Sauerkraut and kielbasa-style sausage is one of the really great Fall comfort foods. Can't wait to try adding caraway seeds as you suggest.

I typically use cold-packed sauerkraut (those glass jars in the refrigerated section)for every recipe. I was wondering, however, what brand of canned "kraut" you're using?

Carroway seed is one of the central flavors to German and Polish cuisine. Consider adding mustard seed or paprika as well. The are the big 3 when it comes to making my food.

You forgot dill.

True; but you don't want to use dill in a heated dish as it looses it's dill flavor when cooked. Bay Leaves are something I would use if you are looking for a bitter herb taste in your German dish. You could also use Juniper Berries and they are also found in pickling spice so would pair well with the sour kraut. Marjoram is also used in making sausages so it would be good to add to amp up the savory nature of a sausage or potato dish.

Personally I always finish my potato salads that I serve at room temperature with fresh dill and marjoram. It adds a nice green color to the creamy salad and serves as a bitter and tangy counter point to the mayonnaise base.

I will have to try some of this when I next get the chance.

I love dill in potato salad.

I love dill in my mouf.

Dill? There's only one reason why I keep Dill in the house:

Ranch Oyster Crackers

brouhaha wrote:

Dill? There's only one reason why I keep Dill in the house:

Ranch Oyster Crackers

I make these all the time by request of all my friends. I personally use non-flavored olive oil to help cut down on the unhealthy fat.

Any recommendations on a pepper grinder or mill? ours broke.

I've heard nothing but good stuff about the Peugeot Pepper Mills. My father is really big on pepper and swears by them.
We had this one on our wedding registry, and my husband was pretty happy with it.

[size=8]Yes, I don't like pepper, please don't kick me out of the thread.[/size]

I find buying salt and pepper grinders really hard. It is amazing how many of them have mechanisms that barely function and you don't often get to try them out in the store to see. That said...

We have a pair of the short peugeot classics for salt and pepper (http://www.amazon.com/Peugeot-PM2259...). I can definitely recommend them from the point of view of build quality and mechanism quality. They seem pretty indestructible and they never fail to grind if there is pepper inside. That said the grind you get is very, very fine. Personally I prefer a slightly coarser grind for cooking so I really only use the peugeot mills for the dinner table. YMMV.

The one I use for cooking is a random cheap plastic one that I have no idea where it came from but just happens to be perfect. Thus illustrating what a crapshoot buying grinders is.

There are grinders where you can set the coarseness of the grind. They usually have ceramic mechanisms. I have two Weber ones and they are great. The plastic they are covered in is rugged and anti-slip -- a good thing when you need to season a pot of boiling stew (steam makes metal surfaces slippery and the steel mechanisms can be prone to rusting in such conditions).

IMAGE(http://www.riversidegardencentre.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/2/image/9d97ab6516a1b4e03c4379d7796df7d6/s/t/style-salt-and-pepper-red_1.jpg)

Thanks for this. My pepper mill bit the dust and the backup from when my partner and I merged households has a very course grind that I dislike. I will look for a Peugeot pepper mill.

It's cold and snowy out, so it's the perfect time for some nice warm soup. Specifically a tomato bisque to remind you of summer.

And this isn't some tomatoey goop with that nasty skin that you get from Cambell's. It's a soup that makes you wonder how a half dozen or so simple ingredients turns into something so danged delicious.

I made this for dinner earlier in the week and I'm making some more tonight. It is just crazy good.

Edwin wrote:

Any recommendations on a pepper grinder or mill? ours broke.

Unicorn pepper mills are the bomb.

Great article on the basics of flavor and how to use them cooking on-the-fly.

http://lifehacker.com/learn-to-make-any-dish-you-cook-better-with-the-science-1477864259

Picked up a 2.5-lb chuck roast, a couple of onions, some Shiner Bock, a can of chipotle peppers, and a can of beans (suck it, Texas!). That's right, this weekend is chili weekend 'round these parts.

Minarchist wrote:

Picked up a 2.5-lb chuck roast, a couple of onions, some Shiner Bock, a can of chipotle peppers, and a can of beans (suck it, Texas!). That's right, this weekend is chili weekend 'round these parts.

Heathen!

OK, so I need some new chef knives. Any recommendations? Would prefer a block (get it?) but really just looking for a good set of knives. Money is not much of an object here. My current set is almost 25 years old and cannot be sharpened any more.

Consumer Reports recommends this set.

Shun knives are fantastic! I would go for a Santoku over that Chef's knife, though. They're much easier to work with in my opinion. My brother has that Shun paring knife. It's very nice. You also would want to pick up a honing steel. I have the Shun one. See the frequently bought together bit for that.

Shun knives are awesome. I don't really need new knives but I'm still looking for an excuse to pick some up.

Edwin wrote:

Consumer Reports recommends this set.

While that's a really solid set, I'd probably spring the extra $120 for this. Same base knives, plus a few nice to have extras.

I made tamagoyaki for dinner this evening along with some rice and potato and onion miso soup. It was a big hit with the household.

I was really surprised how incredibly delicious it was! It's my new favorite way to cook eggs. Gonna try it with some green onions next time.

Thanks for sharing, sounds easy! I may give it a whirl this weekend, but with a round pan. I have a feeling the edges won't be as uniform as a result, but that's ok.

This past weekend we made Spaghetti Cupcakes, which was a hit with the kids

1 pound spaghetti cooked and cooled
4 eggs
1 cup of grated cheeses (we used Parm and Romano blend)
Salt & Pepper

1. Mix eggs and cheese in a large bowl
1a. Add any other ingredient here (chopped meats, spinach, onions)
2. Add spaghetti and evenly mix, season with salt and pepper as needed
3. Prepare/grease a cupcake tin
4. Add spaghetti mixture into tins
5. Sprinkle tops with a little more grated cheese and put in preheated oven at 400F for about 10 minutes.

When done, we took them out and quartered them. Easy finger food for the kiddos.

That sounds awesome brouhaha. My niece is coming to visit next week, so maybe something fun like that will get her eating something other than plain pasta.

I would think you could use a 9x5 loaf pan for tamagoyaki. The pan they used was probably wider and more shallow but it would give you a uniform length for the log roll.

EvilHomer3k wrote:

I would think you could use a 9x5 loaf pan for tamagoyaki. The pan they used was probably wider and more shallow but it would give you a uniform length for the log roll.

I think someone tried a bread pan in the comments without success. It might be a bit tricky to do the rolling with those sides. I bought a $20 pan off Amazon which is the one they use in the video from what I can tell. The round pan thing should work. A nonstick coating is the essential part because most of the oil ends up getting soaked up as you roll the egg back and forth. There's another video on japanesecooking101.com where they make tamagoyaki with green onions in a round pan. I think they just poured all the egg in the pan and then rolled it up. Once you get it rolled halfway, you can pull the egg to you so that you keep the log shape.