Come all ye self-styled chefs and kitchen users, we must talk.

Do you really want to boil when making a stock? I though simmering produced a better and clearer end product for stock and soup. Thoughts?

I simmer stocks. Boiling can break down flavors.

Edit: By the way, a medium or small crock pot can make amazing stock overnight. They're great for this.

LouZiffer wrote:

I simmer stocks. Boiling can break down flavors.

Edit: By the way, a medium or small crock pot can make amazing stock overnight. They're great for this.

Crock pot cooking may be one of the least appreciated and unsexy cooking methods, but it is still my preferred means of cooking shoulder and rump roasts. And yes, the resulting stock is often better than what I can create conventionally in a stock pot. Sad truth is, however, that I've never attempted to reserve this crock pot stock. It's stupid but I had this crazy idea that doing so was somehow cheating.

ringsnort wrote:

Crock pot cooking may be one of the least appreciated and unsexy cooking methods,

Actually, I think that's microwave cooking.

Meh. Microwave ovens have their place in a kitchen. My issue there is over use and inappropriate use.

LouZiffer wrote:

I simmer stocks. Boiling can break down flavors.

Edit: By the way, a medium or small crock pot can make amazing stock overnight. They're great for this.

Clear and flavorful stock? Pressure cooker is your friend. Just wait until it cools down, otherwise the debris would mix back into the stock. Refer to Heston Blumenthal for further tips.

ringsnort wrote:

Do you really want to boil when making a stock? I though simmering produced a better and clearer end product for stock and soup. Thoughts?

I should clarify, I guess. When I said "boil", I didn't mean cook it to hard crack stage like you were making candy. I meant a low boil, barely moving.

However, for a "game" stock like goat you do have to cook it harder to get the flavor out of the bones. And for clarity, you skim often and then strain through cheesecloth before letting it cool to get that last bit of fat out of it.

Or, as I said, embrace the cloudiness by enriching the broth with the meat and cook something that benefits from it like that bean soup.

And yeah, I use my pressure cooker for making dishes like this a lot. I didn't think to suggest it to Jonman, and I think they have one.

ringsnort wrote:

Meh. Microwave ovens have their place in a kitchen. My issue there is over use and inappropriate use.

I agree with this completely. My biggest peeve is people that somehow refuse to acknowledge the power level setting on a microwave. Tired of your "fresh from the freezer" meal being burned on the edges and cold in the middile? Then put the power level on 50% or 60% and add a few extra minutes and you'll have an evenly heated meal.

It's like if you only cook with your stove top or oven on the highest setting; you'll get a lot of charred and unappetizing foods.

Blondish83 wrote:
ringsnort wrote:

Meh. Microwave ovens have their place in a kitchen. My issue there is over use and inappropriate use.

I agree with this completely. My biggest peeve is people that somehow refuse to acknowledge the power level setting on a microwave. Tired of your "fresh from the freezer" meal being burned on the edges and cold in the middile? Then put the power level on 50% or 60% and add a few extra minutes and you'll have an evenly heated meal.

It's like if you only cook with your stove top or oven on the highest setting; you'll get a lot of charred and unappetizing foods.

It's a pet peeve of mine too. It's very rare that I use the microwave full blast. Pretty much when I use the 30-second reheat button. I WISH I could set the default to about 70%.

90% of the microwave's use in my house is nuking empty plates so that you're not serving hot food onto cold plates.

Full power eff tee dubs!

Since we moved, we haven't gotten another microwave. ^_^

I have found the missing ingredient in my kielbasa and sauerkraut. Caraway seed. Who knew?

To make it is simple:

Stuff needed:
A pan.
A knife.
Something to stir with, wooden spoon works well.
You could eat it out of the pan with the knife but I prefer a plate and fork.

1/2 package polska kielbasa
1 8oz can sauerkraut
1 onion
some pepper
garlic (I use the powdered form because I'm lazy)
caraway seed

Process:

Heat pan on med to med/high, toss some butter in there.
Chop up an onion into healthy sized chunks.
Apply chopped onion to pan.
Sizzle until it starts to get floppy and clearish.
Add some pepper and garlic to taste.
Chop up 1/2 a sausage and add it to pan.
Cook until nicely browned.
Add 1 8oz can of sauerkraut and several dashes caraway seed to pan.
Mix it up some.
Stirring as needed continue cooking until done to taste, I prefer a browned sauerkraut with little to no water left.

Serve with side of mustard, I prefer a brown spicy mustard.

plavonica wrote:

I have found the missing ingredient in my kielbasa and sauerkraut. Caraway seed. Who knew?

This guy.
IMAGE(http://polpix.sueddeutsche.com/polopoly_fs/1.1140031.1355572816!/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/900x600/image.jpg)

plavonica wrote:

I have found the missing ingredient in my kielbasa and sauerkraut. Caraway seed. Who knew?

Sauerkraut and kielbasa-style sausage is one of the really great Fall comfort foods. Can't wait to try adding caraway seeds as you suggest.

I typically use cold-packed sauerkraut (those glass jars in the refrigerated section)for every recipe. I was wondering, however, what brand of canned "kraut" you're using?

ringsnort wrote:
plavonica wrote:

I have found the missing ingredient in my kielbasa and sauerkraut. Caraway seed. Who knew?

Sauerkraut and kielbasa-style sausage is one of the really great Fall comfort foods. Can't wait to try adding caraway seeds as you suggest.

I typically use cold-packed sauerkraut (those glass jars in the refrigerated section)for every recipe. I was wondering, however, what brand of canned "kraut" you're using?

Carroway seed is one of the central flavors to German and Polish cuisine. Consider adding mustard seed or paprika as well. The are the big 3 when it comes to making my food.

ringsnort wrote:

I typically use cold-packed sauerkraut (those glass jars in the refrigerated section)for every recipe. I was wondering, however, what brand of canned "kraut" you're using?

Considering my current economic status? The bent tin at the back of the discount store.
Or just a couple of extra cans from the WinCo sale they had. Dollar store sells the sausage.

So I made Bo Ssam tonight (recipe in the second link) for my wife and I as well as a few friends. Anyway, one of the easiest things I've ever cooked and possibly the most delicious. Highly recommended for everyone who eats meat and wants others to think highly of their cooking skills.

Anyone have any tasty, but relatively simple, dessert ideas? Ideally something both kids and adults would dig.

I recently make an apple and cinnamon cake that seem to be a hit with friends. There's also chocolate fondant, apple crumble... Depends what you're hungry for, I guess, but there are tons out there. I'll post the recipes for those three in the morning (I have them stashed somewhere but I need to translate them first).

OG_slinger wrote:

Anyone have any tasty, but relatively simple, dessert ideas? Ideally something both kids and adults would dig.

Lemon posset

600ml Heavy cream cream
200g golden caster sugar
Zest 2 lemons, plus their juice.

Put the sugar, cream and zest in a milk pan and bring to a very gentle boil. Let it simmer for 1-2mins. Take off the heat and strain the zest out of cream. The stir the juice of 1 lemon in to the cream. Taste, if it's not too sour add the juice of the other lemon (or to taste). Divide the cream in to 4-6 pots or ramekins and put in the fridge to set. This will take at least 3 hours but overnight is ideal.

For an interesting and more adult twist halve the sugar and add a small sprig of fresh basil in with the cream at the start of the heating process.

Any sort of Trifle will do. Think cream/custard, fruit, jelly/chocolate/nutella, cookie/sponge cake stacked in a large container and you spoon it out for dessert. Kids love it because it's messy and sweet and adults love it for the same reasons honestly. Best of all, no baking required. There are tons of versions of this so find one you like and go nuts (which taste great in a trifle too!)

I'll second a good trifle. It is delicious.

Trifle ain't a trifle.

Back to the rice cooker question that I *think* was in this thread a few weeks ago - is there enough of a difference in quality between the $130 Zojirushi and the $230 induction heating Zojirushi to justify the cost? We're in the market for one, and I want to make sure we get a winner.

Tanglebones wrote:

Back to the rice cooker question that I *think* was in this thread a few weeks ago - is there enough of a difference in quality between the $130 Zojirushi and the $230 induction heating Zojirushi to justify the cost? We're in the market for one, and I want to make sure we get a winner.

I don't know if there is. I will say that the $130 one does a great job. The rice is perfectly and evenly cooked. There is absolutely no toasting on the bottom or sides. The construction is very solid. It's really easy to clean. The twinkle, twinkle, little star rendition is lovely.

I'd be curious to know if there is any justifiable reason. Maybe it would last you 20 years instead of 10. I already feel like I have perfection with the $130 one.

One hundred and thirty dollars is already a lot of money for a rice cooker. Didn't even know there were 230 dollar models. O_O

OG_Slinger, I haven't forgotten about you, will try to post those recipes tonight.

I got the $130 one, and I love it. I really don't know what the extra $100 gets you.

sometimesdee wrote:

I got the $130 one, and I love it. I really don't know what the extra $100 gets you.

So far as I can tell from Amazon, it's the use of an induction heating element, rather than whatever the $130 one uses; Zojirushi is saying that it helps with the fuzzy logic, since it can apply the heat from different directions, rather than just bottom-upwards.

Sure, it's a different technique, but how does it actually matter?

sometimesdee wrote:

Sure, it's a different technique, but how does it actually matter?

That's what I'm trying to find out