Come all ye self-styled chefs and kitchen users, we must talk.

I had posted earlier about making German/Polish food. I took on a challenge this weekend and made my family recipe for Bierocks. It's a 3 day process to prepare/proof the dough, make the filling, proof them once assembled, and on the final day bake them. I used two types of dough, the first being more of a sweet biscuit one suggested by a friend and the 2nd my family's traditional sweet dinner roll recipe.

This set is the batch made with my family's dough recipe and they came out rich and buttery which pairs so well with the seasoned beef, onion, celery, and cabbage insides. Someone had misplaced my rolling pin so these were hand kneaded and formed resulting in a few bursting while baking.

IMAGE(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/656_10100109938983652_1491966417_n.jpg)

This batch is the one with the more sweet biscuit dough. They came out fine but did not proof up as much and came out more dense and with a bit of chew. So much for the short-cut recipe.

IMAGE(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/p206x206/215418_10100109248756872_377017563_n.jpg)

Does anyone else have a good recipe for a sweet dinner roll or bun that they use? I always like trying new recipes for dough. Nothing quite as satisfying as punching down a batch of dough that is proofing overnight.

Pictures or the Bierocks didn't happen.

Blondish83 wrote:

Does anyone else have a good recipe for a sweet dinner roll or bun that they use? I always like trying new recipes for dough. Nothing quite as satisfying as punching down a batch of dough that is proofing overnight.

The fam loves these rolls. Though the recipe is very forgiving, I still tweak the flour by +/- 30g depending on humidity.

Dinner Rolls

INGREDIENTS:
2 1/4 tsp (1 envelope) active dry yeast
1/4 cup very warm water
1/3 cup sugar
1/4 cup butter or margarine
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup hot milk
1 egg, lightly beaten
540g (~4 1/3 cups) flour (bread flour works best, but all-purpose is fine)
2 tablespoons melted butter, for brushing rolls

PREPARATION:
Sprinkle the yeast over very warm water in a large bowl (Very warm water should feel comfortably warm when dropped on wrist.) Stir until yeast dissolves.

Separately, add sugar, 1/4 cup butter, and salt to hot milk and stir until the sugar dissolves and butter is melted. (I cheat by heating the milk and butter together.) Cool mixture if needed until friendly to yeast (at most 115F).

Add milk mixture to yeast, then beat in egg. Beat in the flour slowly to form a soft dough. (I put it all in the mixer bowl and use a dough hook.) Knead in mixer for ~2 minutes or by hand for ~5 minutes. Place dough in a bowl that has been buttered or sprayed with oil; turn greased-side up. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled.

Punch dough down and knead for a few minutes to distribute the yeast. Dough will be sticky, but use as little flour as possible if you're using your hands. Pinch off small chunks of dough and shape into round rolls about 1.5 inches in diameter. Place in neat rows, not quite touching, in a well-buttered 13" x 9" x 2" pan (I use glass/pyrex). Cover rolls and let rise in a warm place until doubled.

Brush tops of rolls with melted butter, then bake in a 375 degrees F oven for 18 to 20 minutes or until nicely browned. Allow to cool for a few minutes before removing from pan.

DanB wrote:

Pictures or the Bierocks didn't happen.

FTFY

"Free samples overnight expressed to every Goodger or it didn't happen."

Anyone have tips on keeping scones from getting moldy. My last 2 blueberry scones got a bit fuzzy after about 4 days.

KingGorilla wrote:

Anyone have tips on keeping scones from getting moldy. My last 2 blueberry scones got a bit fuzzy after about 4 days.

I wrap them and keep them in the fridge. Then nuke them for ~10 seconds after taking them out. They last about a week then. If you're still finding they go bad, freeze them unbaked and bake them as you need more.

KingGorilla wrote:

Anyone have tips on keeping scones from getting moldy. My last 2 blueberry scones got a bit fuzzy after about 4 days.

Greed.

Oh dude, I made like 20, and I was eating 2 a day sometimes.

I feel bad, because I saved 2 for my wife, and on Saturday breakfast she takes a bite and sees a fuzzy blueberry.

I might go back to using jams in my scones. I also had some banana muffins get fuzzy after a week.

I wonder, is it tied to the age of the fruit? I would think the oven would kill off the mold spores on any older and over-ripe fruits.

Refrigeration is OK, but it tends to dry out baked goods. Microwaving is OK, but again microwaving a week old scone that has been refrigerated, is quite dry. Supposedly baked scones can be frozen and warmed up, but I scoff at that.

KingGorilla wrote:

I wonder, is it tied to the age of the fruit? I would think the oven would kill off the mold spores on any older and over-ripe fruits.

It's tied to moisture content and air temperature. Mold spores are invasive little buggers, and fruit in breads gives them a place with good conditions to grow. Without added preservatives, baked goods tend to go bad in a few days when kept at room temperature anyway. It's pretty impressive that your blueberry scones lasted 4 IMO.

By the way, the tendency to dry is why I wrap them in plastic wrap.

Jonman wrote:
KingGorilla wrote:

Anyone have tips on keeping scones from getting moldy. My last 2 blueberry scones got a bit fuzzy after about 4 days.

Greed.

I agree. You should have shared with the rest of the class.

Do not scoff at the freezing of baked goods. You are best freezing them as soon as possible after baking. I always freeze my Beirocks immediately after cooking unless I will eat them in the next day or two. They can keep for up to 3 months in the freezer and taste fresh.

The key is to put them in a freezer bag while they are warm to the touch but not hot. Once they cool to room temperature I put them into the freezer so that I am not shocking them which would cause the ice crystals to form and damage the texture of the bread. It may also sound wrong but I always leave a bit of air in the bag when freezing bread to allow the moisture to remain even until I am ready to thaw it.

That dough recipe is nearly exactly the same as the one I use for my Bierocks. My grandmother always called it a Vortig dough, which the closest word I can find is Fertig which is German for ready. I think something got lost in translation through the years.

Blondish83 wrote:

Do not scoff at the freezing of baked goods. You are best freezing them as soon as possible after baking. I always freeze my Beirocks immediately after cooking unless I will eat them in the next day or two. They can keep for up to 3 months in the freezer and taste fresh.

The key is to put them in a freezer bag while they are warm to the touch but not hot. Once they cool to room temperature I put them into the freezer so that I am not shocking them which would cause the ice crystals to form and damage the texture of the bread. It may also sound wrong but I always leave a bit of air in the bag when freezing bread to allow the moisture to remain even until I am ready to thaw it.

As a former professional baker, I officially endorse this post. Works for bread and bagels also.

This is a Goan Prawn and Egg curry I cooked last night. It uses pre-cooked prawns, which while they tasted fine, I suspect I would use un-cooked next time.

Very delicious!

IMAGE(http://d3j5vwomefv46c.cloudfront.net/photos/large/747203798.jpg)

Everyone who cooks and has Kindle: Ruhlman's Twenty for Kindle is currently only 3 dollars. Everyone should have the book. (The link should also donate to GWJ, hope I tagged it correctly).

I've skimmed because 35 pages! but has there been a discussion about steak so far?

The only discussion there should be about steak is that if it's not red inside you're doing it wrong.

[size=8](I have no idea, I'm a filthy skimmer too)[/size]

Eleima wrote:

The only discussion there should be about steak is that if it's not red inside you're doing it wrong.

[size=8](I have no idea, I'm a filthy skimmer too)[/size]

I don't really think it matters one jot, it's just personal preference. As long as you're not reducing it to a black lump, if the meat is genuinely good quality then it'll still taste great well done. You do run in to problems with lower quality meat, in that case the closer you get to well done more flavourless and cardboard-y the meat becomes, then there is a good practical case for erring on the side of redder.

Steak is different in preparation if you are doing it on grill or in the kitchen.

Grill, it's all about getting the good sear marks then moving to a cooler area of the grill to finish.

With the kitchen, you want to get your sear in a well oiled skillet. Then, finish in the oven for the perfect texture and flavor. I prefer a good Stainless Steel pan so you can get an even temperature for a good quality sear then you can throw the whole thing in a pre-heated oven at around 300 to finish to your medium-rare or preferred level of done.

I also recommend if you want steak at a budget, consider buying the cheaper cuts like Round Steak and Swissing it. By cubing and searing it off with some flour you lock in the moisture while you braise it in a sauce. You get the tender texture of a steak with the rich beef flavor for 1/2 to 1/4 the price. Serve over rice or mashed potatoes and yum!

Blondish83 wrote:

I also recommend if you want steak at a budget, consider buying the cheaper cuts like Round Steak and Swissing it. By cubing and searing it off with some flour you lock in the moisture while you braise it in a sauce. You get the tender texture of a steak with the rich beef flavor for 1/2 to 1/4 the price. Serve over rice or mashed potatoes and yum!

That's also close to country style steak.

- Spice the flour. Salt and pepper are good with anything. Otherwise be creative.
- Sear the steaks a couple pieces at a time in a cast iron dutch oven. (About 1 or 2 minutes per side.)
- Toss in a couple tablespoons of the spiced flour and mop up the remaining oil with it after searing.
- Pour in two cups of stock (your choice), stir/deglaze very lightly, and put the steaks back in the dutch oven.
- Put the dutch oven in a 300F oven for 1.5 to 2 hours until the steaks are near fall-apart tender.

So good. You can go anywhere with the spices to flavor it differently. Chinese five spice, curry, use season salt instead of regular, savory herbs, garlic... you-name-it. I experiment a lot with this and write down my favorites.

AP Erebus wrote:

This is a Goan Prawn and Egg curry I cooked last night. It uses pre-cooked prawns, which while they tasted fine, I suspect I would use un-cooked next time.

Very delicious!

Even frozen raw prawns will work, shrimps cook pretty damn fast. I use a lot of frozen prawns just because of cost. Fresh must be cooked same day, and I am not about to run to the fish monger on a Tuesday after work.

And as for steak on a budget. Buy some meat tenderizer and a pack of trimmings/stew meat from the butcher, or just a chuck steak that you cut into cubes. Overnight or before you leave for the day, toss the meat in tenderizer, and your seasoning or marinade. Then make kebabs.

LouZiffer wrote:
Blondish83 wrote:

I also recommend if you want steak at a budget, consider buying the cheaper cuts like Round Steak and Swissing it. By cubing and searing it off with some flour you lock in the moisture while you braise it in a sauce. You get the tender texture of a steak with the rich beef flavor for 1/2 to 1/4 the price. Serve over rice or mashed potatoes and yum!

That's also close to country style steak.

- Spice the flour. Salt and pepper are good with anything. Otherwise be creative.
- Sear the steaks a couple pieces at a time in a cast iron dutch oven. (About 1 or 2 minutes per side.)
- Toss in a couple tablespoons of the spiced flour and mop up the remaining oil with it after searing.
- Pour in two cups of stock (your choice), stir/deglaze very lightly, and put the steaks back in the dutch oven.
- Put the dutch oven in a 300F oven for 1.5 to 2 hours until the steaks are near fall-apart tender.

So good. You can go anywhere with the spices to flavor it differently. Chinese five spice, curry, use season salt instead of regular, savory herbs, garlic... you-name-it. I experiment a lot with this and write down my favorites.

I have done this and swapped a cup of broth for a half-cup of booze (wine, beer, hard liqour) to get other flavors and help break down the steak further. Comes out more of of a pulled pork texture vs steak.

wanderingtaoist wrote:

Everyone who cooks and has Kindle: Ruhlman's Twenty for Kindle is currently only 3 dollars. Everyone should have the book. (The link should also donate to GWJ, hope I tagged it correctly).

Bought and read a couple chapters. Very interesting read and definitely worth it.

Eleima wrote:

The only discussion there should be about steak is that if it's not red inside you're doing it wrong.

[size=8](I have no idea, I'm a filthy skimmer too)[/size]

There's a lot of dick swinging about how rare you eat your steak that seriously needs to die.

Maq wrote:
Eleima wrote:

The only discussion there should be about steak is that if it's not red inside you're doing it wrong.

[size=8](I have no idea, I'm a filthy skimmer too)[/size]

There's a lot of dick swinging about how rare you eat your steak that seriously needs to die.

If you're not swinging it counter clockwise you're doing it wrong.

Maq wrote:
Eleima wrote:

The only discussion there should be about steak is that if it's not red inside you're doing it wrong.

[size=8](I have no idea, I'm a filthy skimmer too)[/size]

There's a lot of dick swinging about how rare you eat your steak that seriously needs to die.

Not sure if this is the particular contest of the c*cks that I would label as the first that needs to go. Frankly, I would lay my sights on well done only establishments, and then get to whether or not your man card remains intact if you are a medium well sort of person.

There's well done only establishments?

In the US there are many. Canada too, I believe. The FDA tried going after my oysters not too long ago too.

I prefer a medium rare steak, but I don't have a man card.

KingGorilla wrote:

In the US there are many. Canada too, I believe. The FDA tried going after my oysters not too long ago too.

I thought I read in another thread that they nabbed your oysters...

I have no desire for a man card, and have no d*ck to swing, but I prefer my steaks medium.

Here's a steak question for ya'll. Marinated or, straight from cow to grill?