Come all ye self-styled chefs and kitchen users, we must talk.

what is with all these people making their spirits so cold? Cold numbs the tongue. You lose so much flavor that way. If you need it cut, use branch water like Walken Dead mentioned. Just a bit of Brita and you're good to go.

Oh no I wasn't going to use for spirits I am a straight scotch kind of guy no 'on the rocks' business. I was thinking more for kids and other parties.

sometimesdee wrote:

I prefer this sphere mold, though!

That is cool too.

28 pages is far too many for the filthy skimmer in me, so I hope that you all haven't heard of this little pizza addition yet:
Sauerkraut!
Just this week I took a not-yet cooked Papa Murphy pizza, the Cowboy Pizza specifically, and spread a thin layer of sauerkraut onto it topped with some additional mozzarella cheese. It was a delicious change of pace. I would bet that this would add a tangy new flavor to frozen pizzas as well. Though it is even better on pizzas made by oneself. Yummy.
~
For something entirely different, I mourn for the lack of a springform pan in my apartment after discovering this amazing looking dessert:

Kirbie's Cravings[/url]][size=15]Two Ingredient Flourless Nutella cake[/size]

Prep Time: 10 mins Cook Time: 25 mins Total Time: 35 mins
Ingredients:

4 large or extra large eggs
8 1/2 ounces Nutella (weigh this out on a scale)
(...)
IMAGE(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-DjRCVBQp6Ko/T2wgETGc5XI/AAAAAAABZEw/BlVsnFUnlmc/s800/flourless-nutella-cake-34.jpg)

I may need to invest in one of those.

Additional 2 ingredient recipes to possibly attempt.

Spoiler:

Too can I vouch for the use of frozen bananas as an alternative to ice cream, though I've not yet had the pleasure of mixing it with peanut butter.

Eldon_of_Azure wrote:

28 pages is far too many for the filthy skimmer in me, so I hope that you all haven't heard of this little pizza addition yet:
Sauerkraut!
Just this week I took a not-yet cooked Papa Murphy pizza, the Cowboy Pizza specifically, and spread a thin layer of sauerkraut onto it topped with some additional mozzarella cheese. It was a delicious change of pace. I would bet that this would add a tangy new flavor to frozen pizzas as well. Though it is even better on pizzas made by oneself. Yummy.

Every pizzeria in Sweden serves what they call "pizza salad" with their pizzas. Finely shredded white cabbage with oregano and vinegar.

A local chain back in Cincinnati had a seasonal pizza with sauerkraut, polish sausage, and brown mustard. It was really, really tasty.

IMAGE(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/619vo4-41ZL._SL500_.jpg)

Ye gods, that's a 7" x 8.5" mold! By my estimates, the length of the barrel makes cubes about 4 inches long, and the grip makes them 2 inches wide. Why the hell would I want ice cubes that big?

EDIT: The description doesn't match the product specs, so it could be 6" x 7"... but that's not much of an improvement.

Tell ya what, I've got some in the freezer. I'll see if they're done.

Edit: 3 inch slide. 3.5 inches overall. Maybe a half-inch thick.

IMAGE(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8388/8498446995_6575c8a2e3.jpg)

Quintin_Stone wrote:

Tell ya what, I've got some in the freezer. I'll see if they're done.

Edit: 3 inch slide. 3.5 inches overall. Maybe a half-inch thick.

IMAGE(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8388/8498446995_6575c8a2e3.jpg)

Cyranix wrote:

Why the hell would I want ice cubes that big?

Really big drinks!

The Impossible Cookbook: How to Cook for the World’s Most Difficult Dietary Restrictions. Thought some might find this of interest around here. The gluten-free chicken and dumplings recipe sounds quite interesting.

dhelor wrote:

The Impossible Cookbook: How to Cook for the World’s Most Difficult Dietary Restrictions. Thought some might find this of interest around here. The gluten-free chicken and dumplings recipe sounds quite interesting.

Shenanigans! Those recipes are full of nightshades... I can't make most of them!

My weirdness aside, the book looks like it's full of good stuff. I love the title.

I heartedly recommend zucchini lasagna. It is a great dish to serve cold, like at a spring or summer BBQ.

For extra fun, you can also do a mix of zucchini and eggplant.

For added health, no breading just grill the veggies.

clover wrote:

My weirdness aside, the book looks like it's full of good stuff. I love the title.

It's not an actual book, just a blog post with a collection of recipes. Would be a good idea though!

KingGorilla wrote:

I heartedly recommend zucchini lasagna. It is a great dish to serve cold, like at a spring or summer BBQ.

Revenge is zucchini lasagna?

dhelor wrote:
clover wrote:

My weirdness aside, the book looks like it's full of good stuff. I love the title.

It's not an actual book, just a blog post with a collection of recipes. Would be a good idea though!

Oh, that was it? Even worse! Everything was tomatoes... that's not an allergy article!

Ahoy chef enthusiasts i have a quick question... i do hope i'm not skimming to much i checked three pages.

What are your thoughts about these knives? I'm in need of a new set and this seems shiny.

IMAGE(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51971MmQ6vL._SY450_.jpg)

Cayne wrote:

Ahoy chef enthusiasts i have a quick question... i do hope i'm not skimming to much i checked three pages.

What are your thoughts about these knives? I'm in need of a new set and this seems shiny.

They seem nice, never had a blade from that company. The reviews include quite a few from Vine, which I always take with a grain of salt. I tend to steer away from knife sets in general; I prefer to mix and match to get a set that feels right and only purchase blades I'll actually use.

It's just my opinion, but I'd rather have a nice Santoku knife and a decent paring knife. These are the paring knives I have. This is the 7" Santoku that I have. The Miyabi was a gift. I'd probably just go with a Shun if I was buying another one. That said, I absolutely love the one I have. That's going to put you over $100, though. Plus, you would need a honer. You should use those very often to keep the edge from folding. Also, some plastic guards are nice if you don't have a block. I can't imagine using one of those awful magnetic things on a nice blade. *shudder*

I've been thinking about bringing this up for awhile. Since I'm in the thread at the moment, what's everyone's favorite way to do scrambled eggs? I throw 1 T butter in a pan over medium heat. Put 2 T freshly chopped thyme in with the butter and maybe a quarter cup of chopped sweet or yellow onion. After a couple minutes, I put in about 5 quartered brown cremini mushrooms (ideally about 3/4" to 1" in diameter) and a tablespoon of water. I add a little salt and pepper. I then cover them and stir/shake every once in awhile until the mushrooms have reduced to about 3/4 their starting size. Then I dump in 4 whisked eggs, scraping/stirring fairly constantly until they're good. Lastly, I grate a little Parmesan over them when they're on the plate. That's a nice big breakfast for one person. The mushrooms end up being perfect and pop with flavor.

I've also just put some chopped thyme in heated non-stick skillet for a minute and then dumped some eggs on that. After they are on the plate, I'll grate a little Parmesan cheese over it. They turn our really well, and without butter, they are probably relatively good for you. I really like the texture with this method.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

It's just my opinion, but I'd rather have a nice Santoku knife and a decent paring knife. These are the paring knives I have. This is the 7" Santoku that I have. The Miyabi was a gift. I'd probably just go with a Shun if I was buying another one. That said, I absolutely love the one I have. That's going to put you over $100, though. Plus, you would need a honer. You should use those very often to keep the edge from folding. Also, some plastic guards are nice if you don't have a block. I can't imagine using one of those awful magnetic things on a nice blade. *shudder*

Mainly I agree with this. I have 3 knives I use regularly; a long pairing knife, a slightly larger 5.5" cleaver/santoku type thing and a much larger 8" chef's knife. There's pretty much nothing you can't do with that set. I would steer clear of large sets of knives for bargain prices and stick with 1 or 2 good quality knives. If you can only afford 1 knife then a santoku or something similar is a great start.

Also those magentic strips are totally fine, used one for near 8 years to no detrimental effect to my knives. Also really good if you are short of counter top space.

DanB speaks truth on the knives. One good chef's knife and a paring knife will do 95% of what you need in the kitchen. The only specialist knives I'd use would be a bread knife, boning knife, and fillet knife.

As for scrambled eggs, I follow Bill Granger's method every morning. Usually with a dash of hot sauce or a blast from my spice weasel to kick it up a notch.

I've had the eggs at Bill's in Darlinghurst and they are, in fact, the best scrambled eggs in the world.

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1...

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

I've been thinking about bringing this up for awhile. Since I'm in the thread at the moment, what's everyone's favorite way to do scrambled eggs? I throw 1 T butter in a pan over medium heat. Put 2 T freshly chopped thyme in with the butter and maybe a quarter cup of chopped sweet or yellow onion. After a couple minutes, I put in about 5 quartered brown cremini mushrooms (ideally about 3/4" to 1" in diameter) and a tablespoon of water. I add a little salt and pepper. I then cover them and stir/shake every once in awhile until the mushrooms have reduced to about 3/4 their starting size. Then I dump in 4 whisked eggs, scraping/stirring fairly constantly until they're good. Lastly, I grate a little Parmesan over them when they're on the plate. That's a nice big breakfast for one person. The mushrooms end up being perfect and pop with flavor.

I've also just put some chopped thyme in heated non-stick skillet for a minute and then dumped some eggs on that. After they are on the plate, I'll grate a little Parmesan cheese over it. They turn our really well, and without butter, they are probably relatively good for you. I really like the texture with this method.

1tbsp of butter in pan over medium heat with a small grind of black pepper. In the meantime whisk 3 eggs with a large pinch of salt and some more black pepper. When the butter is finished foaming add the eggs and turn the heat down to the lowest available. Stir/fold occasionally trying to maintain reasonable curds without breaking it up in to tiny, tiny pieces. Then I always serve it in the french en baveuse style. Occasionally but rarely I'll stir in greated cheddar towards the end. If available I'll add chopped chives.

Maq wrote:

DanB speaks truth on the knives. One good chef's knife and a paring knife will do 95% of what you need in the kitchen. The only specialist knives I'd use would be a bread knife, boning knife, and fillet knife.

Yeah the order I would buy knives would be

General all purpose chef's knife/santoku thing -> pairing knife -> bread knife -> carving knife -> boning knife -> fillet knife

Change the sort order of the last 4 depending how much boning, filleting or bread cutting you do.

Maq wrote:

DanB speaks truth on the knives. One good chef's knife and a paring knife will do 95% of what you need in the kitchen. The only specialist knives I'd use would be a bread knife, boning knife, and fillet knife.

As for scrambled eggs, I follow Bill Granger's method every morning. Usually with a dash of hot sauce or a blast from my spice weasel to kick it up a notch.

I've had the eggs at Bill's in Darlinghurst and they are, in fact, the best scrambled eggs in the world.

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1...

I prefer Bill's method for my own eggs. The family prefers larger, firmer curds though. For that reason I tend to use the Martha Stewart method. I use a wood spatula on a flat-bottomed non-stick frying pan or electric fry pan. The method uses slightly higher heat. Scrape toward the center of the pan working your way around the pan radially. You'll end up with a large pile of scrambled eggs in the middle with huge squarish curds. When they're almost done, remove from heat (or turn off the fry pan) and cover to allow them to finish.

From my experience, the nicer Disney buffets such as Boma use the same method. It works well for large quantities of eggs, which is good since I'm cooking meals for at least 6 regularly.

LouZiffer wrote:

From my experience, the nicer Disney buffets such as Boma use the same method. It works well for large quantities of eggs, which is good since I'm cooking meals for at least 6 regularly.

Runny eggs in restaurants really only works if you're making them to order.

Re: knives -- Chicago Cutlery is okay, but not great. Agree with others that you don't really need a big knife set. If you don't want to drop a bundle, these knives get consistently good reviews from Cook's Illustrated. again, a paring knife and chef's knife/santoku are all you need for general work -- you can add other things like a bread knife or a boning knife as you need them.

As far as the magnetic strips, when I was working in a kitchen that's how we stored knives and it was fine.

sometimesdee wrote:
KingGorilla wrote:

I heartedly recommend zucchini lasagna. It is a great dish to serve cold, like at a spring or summer BBQ.

Revenge is zucchini lasagna?

I make it with a Diavolo sauce, so yes.

Re: magnetic strips, just put the knife on it carefully, spine first, then rotate it toward the spine and pull to remove it again.

Magnets get a bad reputation from people just slapping their knives onto them, then ripping them back off with no regard for the blade.

KingGorilla wrote:
sometimesdee wrote:
KingGorilla wrote:

I heartedly recommend zucchini lasagna. It is a great dish to serve cold, like at a spring or summer BBQ.

Revenge is zucchini lasagna?

I make it with a Diavolo sauce, so yes.

(smartass comment about zucchini lasagna diavolo being the only good thing to come out of Detroit)

clover wrote:

Re: magnetic strips, just put the knife on it carefully, spine first, then rotate it toward the spine and pull to remove it again.

Magnets get a bad reputation from people just slapping their knives onto them, then ripping them back off with no regard for the blade.

I WILL NEVER APPROVE OF THEM! Yeah, I get that they're not going to harm the edge, so from a practical standpoint they are great. Likely, they won't even scratch good steel, or at most, the scratching will be minimal. Using them at people's houses, doing it just like you mention, makes me cringe.