Come all ye self-styled chefs and kitchen users, we must talk.

ClockworkHouse wrote:
tuffalobuffalo wrote:

Made my cayenne dark chocolate chip with toasted sliced almond cookies tonight!

You got a recipe for those cookies? They look like something I need in my life.

Finally found it back on page 58 (2014!) I edited the cayenne down to 1/8 t to 1/4 t depending on taste down from the 1/2 t I originally had it at. It's too much for most people, and I think 1/4 t is the sweet spot for me where you still don't taste it but feel it warm your chest a few seconds after you take a bite. I also added in a note about increasing the salt if you use unsalted butter. This is just the Toll House recipe modified a little, so they're going to be nice and gooey if you don't overcook 'em.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

(note: I edited this a little from when it was originally posted) Well, it's official. I've created the best cookies ever made. I took a standard chocolate chip cookie recipe and modified it a bit. There's not enough cayenne pepper in them to taste at first. It just sort of warms you up 10-20 seconds after you start eating the cookie.

Cayenne Dark Chocolate Chip Cookies

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Ingredients

2 1/4 C all-purpose flour
1 t baking soda
1 t salt (1 1/2 t salt if using unsalted butter)
1 C (2 sticks) butter
3/4 C granulated sugar
3/4 C packed brown sugar
1 t vanilla
2 eggs
10 oz dark chocolate chunks or chips
1 C sliced almonds
1/8-1/4 t cayenne pepper

Directions

Toast the almonds in a skillet. Soften the butter with a fork. Add all the sugar and mix. Add the eggs and mix. Add the baking soda, salt, vanilla, and cayenne pepper and mix. Add the flour and mix. Add the chocolate and almonds and mix. Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees F. Refrigerate for 30 minutes or so. Place scoops on a cookie sheet and cook for 9-15 minutes on the middle rack.

Mine didn't turn out like the originals in that picture! That was a pretty little cookie. Probably need to play with oven temp a bit at my current place. I think it was a little hot. The cookie sheets were also a bit different, and I was kinda mass producing. Still tasty as hell.

And Zojirushi magic. Seriously. Amazing cookers.

Thanks for the sous vide evaporation info, folks.

-BEP

Boudreaux wrote:

Forget the keema, I want to know how you get rice that looks that good! I have tried half a dozen ways to cook rice and I can't find anything that gives nice long separate grains like that. Either it's sticky, or the grains look sort of overcooked, or something. It tastes fine, but it never has the texture that I want. I have tried stove top, Instant Pot, rice cooker, covered, uncovered, rinsed, not rinsed, etc.

If my rice comes out a bit stickier than I wanted, it usually means I used a little too much water. Maybe try a quarter cup less and see if that makes a difference. Basmati fluffs up really nicely, so that's a good rice to test for texture. One other thing I like to do when the rice finishes is use a fork to fluff by gently pulling the sides toward the center. This helps to separate it and creates space for more steam to escape from the bottom. Also, make sure you do not dig in with a spoon and start mixing when it finishes. That can smash the rice together and make things sticky.

So, sorry for longtime lurker in this thread, but like a lot of you, my wife and I are spending a lot more time really cooking than we used to. And here are a few things we discovered in the last 90 days, 25 years after we started living together.

1: We shoulda bought a cheap, 6 burner gas range from a restaurant supply store. The one we have has a center burner for a griddle we never use. But I'd kill for 6 burners. Also cheap restaurant supply ranges have no electricity involved. We haven't pulled the trigger, but we're going to. https://www.webstaurantstore.com/ is the place i discovered.

2: Same place, we ordered a $100 two foot square stainless work table which we're using as an island. It's indestructible and heat proof, and it changed our lives.

3: Expensive cookware is mostly a scam. We've slowly replaced all our fancy stuff with $30 restaurant nonsticks and clad-aluminum. And it's all so much better.

4: Get rid of all single use stuff. We have mostly just been tossing crap away, and then getting extras of useful things. We now have like 6 mixing bowls that are all big, and nest and were $6 each or something, and were never missing anything. Same with cutting boards. A few that are the same, in an open air cutting board rack, super useful. get rid of all the different sizes.

5: Our microwave caught fire (welcome to quarantine!) and we pretty much decided were not replacing it. We have used our second oven, which is an electric mini oven we keep in the basement, a TON!

6: Cheap ceramic knives. You wont find in a restaurant, but we spend $50 on new knives every few years, and never sharpen a thing. If you don't beat them up they last a long time. I bought fancy good steel knives a decade ago and learned how to sharpen them, and now they just decorate the knife strip.

rabbit wrote:

1: We shoulda bought a cheap, 6 burner gas range from a restaurant supply store. The one we have has a center burner for a griddle we never use.

Oh god, yes. I would absolutely love 6 burners. Especially since one of my burners is a little "keep things warm" and there's a central griddle burner that is useless. We may have the same stove?

rabbit wrote:

3: Expensive cookware is mostly a scam. We've slowly replaced all our fancy stuff with $30 restaurant nonsticks and clad-aluminum. And it's all so much better.

Yup.

rabbit wrote:

4: Get rid of all single use stuff.

Absolutely. Ever since we heard Alton Brown talk about single use items we made a concerned effort to get rid of all that stuff. The only thing we have left is a bread maker that we barely use.

I think Food Lab has a good guide on the only things you need in the kitchen and balances cost vs practicality very well. I can't imagine needing more than four burners, but I only cook for 1 or 2 typically! I think you need to spend enough on most kitchen items so that they last a couple decades. I'm sick of cheap crap breaking or going bad and having to throw it into a landfill. Certain things like non-stick skillets are an exception. I've been buying most things over the last 5 years to last a lifetime or at least a couple decades, hopefully. For example the expensive thermapen I got is life changing. Both my brothers now own one. Nice Vitamix (bought used) and Cuisinart food processor are indespensible. I love, use, and sharpen all my very nice and cheaper knives. I bought the All-clad measuring cups. Excessive? Yes. Regrets? None after the first use. My recently new Le Creuset Dutch oven? You will have to pry that thing from my cold, dead hands.

I just found out smoked salmon, pepper jack, and corn tortilla quesadillas have the perfect flavor combination. I am in love with these things!

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rabbit wrote:

2: Same place, we ordered a $100 two foot square stainless work table which we're using as an island. It's indestructible and heat proof, and it changed our lives.

We will be moving later this year or next year, and I'm definitely going to be making sure the next place has more counter, pantry, and storage space options. I really want a big island with lots of counter space. We'll see how it goes! I may have to get creative.

OG_slinger wrote:
tuffalobuffalo wrote:

Since we got the Vitamix, I made the Food Lab tomato soup today along with some grilled Beyond Burger cheeseburgers. So good and easy. Never getting canned tomato soup again. Used a bunch of fresh oregano growing in the yard and added some toasted hazlenuts before pureeing it.

Food Wishes tomato bisque is my go to. I always have a container or two in the freezer.

Thanks for the recommendation! I made this the other night and it was fantastic. Even my daughter, who is notoriously picky, loved it.

I will have to try this recipe! The rice aspect is really neat. I used San Marzano canned tomatoes in my last tomato soup escapade.

Speaking of the Food Labs tomato soup, one of the only good things coming from this lockdown is that Kenji is recording a bunch of videos and putting them on YouTube.

So one day he made the sauce for his excellent no-knead cast iron pizza recipe and then uploaded another one where he took the remaining sauce and turned it into the FL tomato soup.

I love that the videos have minimal edits and are mostly in real time. Beyond any recipe he does, the real value is seeing how he preps, cooks, deals with ingredient subs, etc.

LeapingGnome wrote:

One thing I miss from gas was having a side burner for a pot. I have thought about buying one of those free standing burners but then I have to set it somewhere and cover it, etc. The need hasn’t overcome my inertia yet.

There's an online group with an app called Weber Kennel Club that discusses all things Weber. One of their subforums is for modifications and accessories. Several of the discussions I've looked at upgrade their tables, but I'd be willing to bet someone has done a mod to add a burner somehow. Should be pretty easy to add in a t-adapter for the gas starter line and then it's just a matter of mounting the burner from at that point.

Made French onion soup for the first time! So yummy.

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Re all the Weber talk, amazingribs.com has some some breakdowns and reviews of various accessories and modifications. I was introduced to the site when I received the cookbook written by the proprietor (Meathead Goldwyn) and have found it to be a very good resource.

My father, brothers, a friend, and I went out for the all-depth Oregon halibut opener this weekend and each caught our 1, so I have some fresh halibut and halibut to go in the freezer. Yay! Mostly small halibut, but one brother got a bigger one! Ate some tonight fried in butter. Starving, so it was good. Gonna do the Kenji panko pan fried recipe tomorrow with the other fresh bit that isn't getting vacuum sealed and frozen.

Want to do the beer battered and fried recipe with some of the frozen eventually.

Have you tried Intergalactic Fishing, Tuffalo? Great little game. No, seriously. Lots of fun and fishing tourneys too. It's old-school, top down, not a first person or over-the-shoulder viewpoint.

Robear wrote:

Have you tried Intergalactic Fishing, Tuffalo? Great little game. No, seriously. Lots of fun and fishing tourneys too. It's old-school, top down, not a first person or over-the-shoulder viewpoint.

Nope! I'll make a point to grab it sometime.

2nd day of fresh Oregon halibut! Made the Kenji panko pan fried recipe since I couldn't get vodka for the beer-batter recipe. So, so good. Also made the homemade mayo and tartar sauce. That was the icing on a very good cake. I've been in heaven all night.

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Fresh halibut, fresh cod, fresh salmon... the Triumvirate of deliciousness!

Wow! These are good! Has the Food Lab homemade mayo, Grey Poupon, and a little Tabasco in it. Used an immersion blender to try and get it smooth. Worked okay. Still, the most amazing thing is having perfect hard-boiled eggs that peel perfectly 100% of the time. No rubberiness at all to the white. It's like nothing I've ever had!

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French onion soup! I make it a couple times a year and it's always so good. Did you add the secret ingredient, brandy?

I made naan using Simon Majumdar's recipe (sorry it's on Facebook) for making it using sourdough discard, and they turned out super yummy.

The trick is, however thin you roll it out that you think is thin enough? Make it thinner. No, thinner still.

First one was thick and bready, still tasty but didn't track as naan at all. By the end I was basically hand-stretching the dough until it was very thin and then dumping it in the pan and they puffed up almost immediately.

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d4m0 wrote:

French onion soup! I make it a couple times a year and it's always so good. Did you add the secret ingredient, brandy?

I went with a very fancy sherry vinegar straight from Jerez that we had on hand.

Those eggs though. They look perfect. Well done!

Robear wrote:

Those eggs though. They look perfect. Well done!

Reading this made me wish I still had some left...

Going to do the beer-battered fried halibut recipe tonight! I'm excited. Had to go to a liquor store today to get cheap vodka. I definitely had the required cheap beer on hand. I have enough leftover homemade tartar sauce to go with.

I was going to do a french fries recipe, but I forgot to got more peanut oil, so I'm going to save that for another time. Probably a bit more to do for one person than I want to deal with anyways. I've got some Kettle Chips on hand, so those'll work to go with.

Ahhhhhhhhh! I did the thing. I made beer-battered fried halibut from the fish we caught last weekend. It was just too good. Not fair to everyone in the world who didn't get to share with us.

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