GWJ BBQ Catch All

Ok, I think I will just get the bigger one then. I don't smoke brisket often but I do cook for a crowd at times and want to keep the option open. Thanks for the info.

No problem. You can easily get 30 lbs or more on the 18.5 though. It's got two cooking racks.

Happy 4th of July to my fellow USAns...

IMAGE(http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d172/tanstaaflWDM/Mobile%20Uploads/2015-07/CameraZOOM-20150704173803279_zps76o4terp.jpg)

Nice. I am sure it was all tasty.

Nice grill. I have the 6 burner version. Just replaced burners, heat shields and some grill grates. When I did I scrapped the upper rack. Got tired of it being in the way.

Arise thread from the glorious flames smoke.

I got a bonus from work and I'm looking to spend it on a getting a nice BBQ.

I have my eye on this Traeger Century 22 Wood Pellet Grill which I could pick up for $699 right now due to Traeger having a "show".

I also like the idea of the Bluetooth control of the Green Mountain Grills, and have been eyeing them as well.

This will be replacing a cheap propane grill that's about 7 years old at this point. I mostly just cook tri-tip, but would like to broaden out into ribs, pulled pork, and brisket.

How have people been liking their pellet grills? How well have they held up? I've read some bad reviews about Traegers and poor quality, but this new model seems to be built pretty well.

I've been eyeing a pellet grill as well... I would also appreciate any thoughts!

I love my pellet grill.

Oh! If you like salmon, check out the fishing thread. If anyone has any interest or questions in regards to smoking or grilling salmon, let me know. I've been smoking and cooking salmon in a big green egg a lot recently. I've got everything down at this point.

The main reason of this post is to tag the thread because I have access to a big green egg now.

Paleocon wrote:
koshnika wrote:

Once you learn how to set the temperature of the fire on BGE or Kamodo they hold temperature very well and require very little adjusting.
I never found them any more of a pain in the ass than any other smoker. They have an intake, vent, and fire placement to setup.

They are much more forgiving of a novice and do not take anywhere near the time required to babysit.

I know at least a dozen folks who have and extol the virtues of a BGE, but all but two of them also own propane grills which they use more often than they use their charcoal. It may be fun to play with and cool to "project" with for a batch of something that isn't terribly time sensitive (like dinner), but it is a giant pain in the ass when you have half an hour or so to get dinner on the table (and you want cleanup done right afterwards as well). For that, you really want an appliance like a wood pellet or gas grill.

If your grill is a weekend, have fun around the fire, beer in hand cookout thing, charcoal is fine. If it is a I have half an hour to get food in my belly sort of thing, you need a reliable appliance. And with temps rising to the point that I can't use my oven comfortably, I really want an appliance.

This sounds about right in my experience. I don't eat a lot of meat and don't need to be able to grill up something quick on weekdays for a meal. The BGE works really well when you are ready to set aside a chunk of time to do BBQ or smoking. It's not all that hard and doesn't require a lot of fiddling, but it does take time.

I'm starting to get a bit of experience with a Big Green Egg (similar to the Komodo), so if anyone wants opinions or ideas on anything in regards to using them, let me know.

My Weber Spirit finally died. I opened it up to replace some parts and the innards literally crumbled in my hands. So bummer that I'm without a grill for the moment, but this gives me an excuse to upgrade! And I blame Paleo for convincing me that a Traeger is the right choice. While the new grill is on the way (free shipping! woo!), I took the opportunity to build a small patio for it. Last thing I want to do is get a fancy new grill and then stick it in the dirt the way my Weber was. A pile of gravel, sand, and bricks later, here we go:

IMAGE(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7469/26409514293_d33d982588_z.jpg)

Nothing extravagant, but it's a level washable surface in the right spot, and unlike the wood platforms I've seen people build, this one won't rot. Onwards!

I just bought the Pro 22 Traeger, and have enjoyed it so far. I'm gonna try a whole chicken on Sunday.

Anyone have advice on buying a gas BBQ?

http://bbqsandgrills.ca/products/nap...

This is what I'm looking at right now..

EDIT: I really want a natural gas BBQ as I have a hookup at my house.

Dakuna wrote:

Anyone have advice on buying a gas BBQ?

http://bbqsandgrills.ca/products/nap...

This is what I'm looking at right now..

EDIT: I really want a natural gas BBQ as I have a hookup at my house.

It has been my experience that the Webers are the only non-disposible ones that are widely available. Unless you want to go with a pricey, smaller manufacturer, the Webers are the way to go.

All the hardware store crap like Charmglow, Charbroil, or what not are pretty terrible after the first year of real use.

I suppose if you have the cash to toss at a Viking, that might be good too, but I wouldn't know because I am not as rich as a Kardashian.

I bought a Char Broil 6 burner about 5 years ago. I used it at least once weekly and it was kept covered. Paid $350ish for it new and 3 years in had too spend another $200 on new burners and grates. Some of the burners could not be replaced because the screws holding them in had rusted and dissolved basically welding the burner in place. Won''t rebuild it again and won't get Char Broil again. If I get another gas I will at least get a Weber or go higher end as Paleo said.

I may also just live with having a smoker and a classic round Weber. Already got those, no further investment needed.

I'm looking at two now: Napoleon Rogue 425 Black and Weber Spirit E-310.

I'll probably make the purchase on Saturday, I appreciate all the advice

Wow. Just one page in a year? Here's an update on my Weber Kettle experience.

Just about a year ago I bought a Weber 22" kettle which included a thermometer, ash container (really helps on windy days), and hinged grate. I also bought a nice chimney starter separately.

Over the past year I've used this setup an average of 3 times per week. Steak, burgers, chicken, sausages, hot dogs, pork chops, pork loin... everything that has come off of this grill has been delicious. I've used it to grill small meals for myself all the way up to a big New Year's Eve party with 10 other traveling families. With the starter plain charcoal takes 15-20 minutes and a couple sheets of newspaper (or some Amazon brown packing paper) to go from lighting to ready.

Other than the grate which is now well seasoned (better than new) the grill is still like new. The starter chimney has wear and a few small spots of rust, but that's expected for something which gets heated to glowing hot and is exposed to the elements. It still has several years left in it. Great for a $15 item that sees this much use.

My usual grilling technique is to dump the coals on one side and spread them out under half the grill. That half is used to sear food or cook quick stuff like hot dogs. The other half is used to finish food which needs more time until it's done. When grilling is finished I shut the vents which puts out the coals very quickly.

With the built in thermometer and vents, I can dial the temperature in anywhere from 250F to 400F and it stays steady for a long time (longer than my cooking sessions). With it wide open I can get it to 500F+ but need to add charcoal regularly to keep that temperature up for a long time.

Nice write up LouZiffer!

Weber sells these nice coal baskets that let you keep coals to one or both sides while keeping the middle or one side open. Very useful in setting up differential temperature areas in the Kettle. (Lou, I'm sure you know about these, but you didn't mention them specifically...).

(Oh, and those Weber restaurants? Terrible... Don't bother. Shockingly flavorless BBQ at very high prices.)

My wife and I got a Weber Spirit for the back porch in Maryland and it works like a champ and is a lot easier to clean than most of the other grills we have had in the past. The grease trap is a little tin foil tray that is disposable and the "flavorizor bars" do a great job of funneling the run off into those trays. The steep angle they are set at also keeps flame ups to a minimum.

The only upgrade I would consider is going with stainless flavorizor bars, but the enameled steel ones are remarkably thick and will probably last a while.

I was, at first, a little concerned that it is a smaller heating surface than I am used to working with on a grill, but the fact that it heats so evenly across the deck means more of it is actually useful to me than the sh1tty Charmglow we trashed a while back. Even with the smaller deck, I find I can very easily cook for 8 without issues without having to cook in chapters like I used to have to do because of the heat consistency issues.

I am still getting the hang of the smoke chips, but even without them, the meat comes out quite flavorful.

WizKid wrote:

I just bought the Pro 22 Traeger, and have enjoyed it so far. I'm gonna try a whole chicken on Sunday.

Update on my Trager. I've used this thing a ton in the past few months and it's proven to be incredibly versatile. And the grease drip system is glorious--some foil on the drip pan and cleanup is trivial. About my only issue with the thing is that the max temperature is about 430 degrees (my Weber Spirit could hit 700 without breaking a sweat), and the temperature takes a while to recover if you open it. This grill really does best if you put the stuff in and just walk away from it til things are done. Which is fine for 95% of the things I use it for anyway.

In related news, my wife got me a portable outdoor pizza oven for Father's Day:

IMAGE(http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/400/a8/a807b2e2-7c38-48da-b3f4-4cf59c8950b6_400.jpg)

It's taken some getting used to, but the thing is great. And small enough that I may just bring it camping with us next time. Pizza is also one of the few things the Trager isn't terribly good for (because of the relatively low max temp), so this has let me continue cooking All The Things outside to keep from heating up the house in summertime.

My son has a friend whose family built their own wood-fired oven (with a pizza oven section) in the back yard. They also make their own dough. It's supposed to be pretty good pizza.

Robear wrote:

My son has a friend whose family built their own wood-fired oven (with a pizza oven section) in the back yard. They also make their own dough. It's supposed to be pretty good pizza. :-)

I made some pizzas last night in a big green egg on a pizza stone. You can get the thing up to 550-600, so it does pizzas really well. You do have to make them a tad small, though. I just did a simple pizza dough with a little tomato sauce, sliced mozzarella, and salted/peppered sliced tomatoes. After it's done, I sprinkled chopped basil on top. It's gonna be hard to top that. That'll probably be my go-to homemade pizza from now on.

I did pizza in the Trager a few times, so it is possible. Used a few overturned foil pie tins to lift the pizza pan off the grill a bit and just let it go. It came out really good, but took quite a long time to cook. By comparison, that portable thing runs at about 700 degrees (it hit 900 when I was heating it up) and cooks a pizza in 6 minutes.

If I could deal with a Big Green Egg's weight, I'd go with that option since those hold their heat so well. One the same size as our Weber weighs as much as me (220lbs)! The Weber is 30lbs. Kind of nice when I have to haul it up the back ramp of our home when we move every few weeks. EDIT: I don't even want to think about getting an egg down the ramp when we set up...

Robear wrote:

My son has a friend whose family built their own wood-fired oven (with a pizza oven section) in the back yard. They also make their own dough. It's supposed to be pretty good pizza. :-)

Worth noting it was a homemade cob oven, and they also have a fire pit in their backyard for whole pigs. They would heat up the pizza and as the oven hit about 400, they'd put in cinnamon rolls and let the heat escape while cooking it at the same time. Best pizza/cinnamon rolls I've ever had.

"Boy, it's Labor Day weekend; I'm going to smoke a bunch of pork from that hog we picked up last weekend. I'll throw some shoulders on around midnight and let them go all night; I'll pull them when they're done and just have it ready for dinner."

*goes to bed*

"Oh no! The temperature gauge when I got up read 270 degrees in the smoker! They're already going to be done! Wait, they're only at around 140, so no issue. I'll let them sit for a while.

*does other things*

"Wow, it's a few hours later, still around the same temp. Oh well, I'll throw on a chicken."

*Waits another couple hours*

"Geez, still around the same temperature. Hey, look, the chicken's already almost to the same temperature as the pork shoulders. I'm sure glad I'm not dumb enough to maybe realize this might mean something. I'll throw on those back ribs as well and just load the thing up."

*Waits several more hours*

*Finds the temperature to be around the same*

*Has moment of inspiration, removes the probe thermometer from the meat and just leaves it in the smoker to check the actual smoker temperature*

*Comes back in 20 minutes to discover that the smoker, which reads at 270 degrees, is actually at around 170 degrees*

*Swears a lot*

Hey, I think I might have finally figured out why it was taking so long for that pork to get done . . .

I feel for you. Done that before myself. Did it finish yet? How was it?

You wanted slow cooked, right?

fishdude wrote:

I feel for you. Done that before myself. Did it finish yet? How was it?

You wanted slow cooked, right?

Ribs went in the oven in foil, chicken and pork shoulder went over indirect heat on the gas grill. The ribs turned out pretty well because I realized the problem reasonably early in the cooking process; the chicken and pork eventually finished and will be lunch tomorrow and, based on taste test, meh.

Lousy smarch grill thermometer.

Caught a 37" Chinook yesterday, processed it yesterday and smoked a small amount today.

This is how much meat a 23.5 lb salmon gives you:

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/Opp3FZ9.jpg)

This is what a small amount looks like smoked:

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/uBd31cy.jpg)

MilkmanDanimal wrote:

*Comes back in 20 minutes to discover that the smoker, which reads at 270 degrees, is actually at around 170 degrees*

*Swears a lot*

Hey, I think I might have finally figured out why it was taking so long for that pork to get done . . .

I had a similar issue when I tried to smoke some meats in my CharBroil gas grill. It turns out the built-in thermometer is useless, everything was still raw after several hours.