2010 - the year we make contact...with more Board Games

Saw a thread for 2009, but not one for this year.

If this is a mistake, please combine.

Anyhow, I'm not buying any new or new-to-me video games this year. 2010 is a year devoted strictly to board games and RPGs. To tell you the truth, video games haven't done much for me the past couple of years, and, more often than not, they've left me feeling empty and cold, and dead inside - not to get overly melodramatic or anything.

Heh...

There's just nothing that beats getting together with real people, face-to-face, and playing some old fashioned, unplugged gaming.

So far this year, the best games I've played:

Cosmic Encounter
Tales of the Arabian Nights
Ghost Stories
Colossal Arena
Smallworld

All of these are brilliant. I am especially in love with Ghost Stories. I love the theme - magic-based martial arts films are some of my favorites (Mr. Vampire, Spooky Encounter, A Chinese Ghost Story) - and I love co-op games. Ghost Stories is almost a co-op puzzle game in the way it is structured. Very, very good, and very, very hard. Brutally difficult.

I'm also making an effort to play out more often. I spent my birthday last Friday at Blue Highway Games (in Seattle), and tonight I'll be heading to Phoenix Games up north in Mukilteo. Any Seattle-area GWJers here should try to go to these places. Blue Highway has open gaming on Friday nights, and it's good fun, while Phoenix games has open gaming on Wednesdays.

I also host bi-monthly gaming sessions at my house.

And finally, I'm starting a bi-monthly gaming group at my work, mainly for non-gamers. Tomorrow is our first sessions and I am bringing: Roll Through the Ages, We Didn't Play Test This, Dice Town, and Zombie Fluxx. Should be fun.

Alright, looking forward to hearing more from you all....

Ghost Stories - a review

"Godard is, for me, intellectual counterfeit money when compared to a good kung fu film."
--Werner Herzog

IMAGE(http://www.genrebusters.com/images/mrv1.jpg)
Mr. Vampire

I am a huge fan of martial arts cinema, especially those involving the mystical arts of spiritual boxing and Taoist magic. With over 300 martial arts films seen, I consider myself an expert of sorts on the genre, and I am always interested in things relating to these films. I am also a fan of board games drenched in theme. I love when a game enhances its already-solid mechanics with great art, an interesting setting, a captivating narrative, and a chance for the players to really get into the characters they are playing. Needless to say, Ghost Stories was practically tailor-made for me.

Based upon movies like Mr. Vampire, A Chinese Ghost Story, Boxer's Omen, Spiritual Boxer, Spooky Encounters, and other martial arts films filled with hopping vampires, ghostly vixens, and Taoist wizards, Ghost Stories perfectly capture the essence of its theme and includes interesting play-mechanics. These kinds of martial arts films are often incredibly frantic and crazy, as they usually feature a lone man defending a villa or a small group of hostages from an onslaught Chinese ghosts and demons. Steeped in Chinese mythology, these films depict magical spells and the mystical arts of spiritual boxing, and so, too, does this game.

IMAGE(http://www.genrebusters.com/images/acgs1.jpg)

Initially I was concerned that the game would not offer the same frantic pace of the movies on which it is based. I'm happy to report that my fears were unfounded; the game is a perfect representation of those films, and it uses its theme expertly. This is not a game on which a theme has been thoughtlessly grafted. Rather, Ghost Stories is a perfect marriage of its thematic elements and game-play mechanics: an example of form and function.

Each of the players takes the roll of a Taoist monk/wizard. The players must work together to defend a hapless village from a seemingly never-ending assault of dark and deadly spirits. Each turn a new threat is introduced, often times triggering a chain reaction of additional threats, and with each passing turn the tension rises and the suspense builds. The players can take advantage of the village resources by visiting a Buddhist temple, drinking a cup of magical tea, offering up a prayer, or by employing the village guards to help push back the advancing demons, among others. But as the ghostly numbers begin to pile up, the village becomes haunted, thus removing the powers of the individual village spaces.

IMAGE(http://www.genrebusters.com/images/sved2.jpg)
Shaolin Vs. Evil Dead

This game takes a great deal of planning, and yet it still feels fast, action packed, and exciting. During each turn a player must accomplish something beneficial. One wasted turn or mistake can be all it takes to see the village overrun and totally haunted, thus ending the game.

Ghost Stories is a very challenging game. I've played four times thus far, and haven't even come close to winning. However, it's still a blast to play. The games are short enough that it never feels as though a lost game is wasted time. Rather, it feels like training, like preparing for the next match. This is, again, a way the game strengthens its martial arts theme.

IMAGE(http://www.genrebusters.com/images/omen3.jpg)
Boxer's Omen

Ghost Stories is quickly becoming one of my favorite games. I find myself thinking about it during the day, and while playing it I totally get involved in the narrative and the scenario. It is a game I want to play all the time, and I'm really looking forward to the first win. I can wholeheartedly recommend this game to fans of heavily thematic games, and to fans of games with great mechanics. It really does offer the best of both worlds.

I've only played Ghost Stories once. It was really tough but quite a bit of fun. Should break that out again one of these days. I'm with you on Tales of the Arabian Nights, lots of fun although it's the type of game I really only want to break out a handful of times a year so the novelty doesn't wear off. Small World doesn't do a whole lot for me, just too simple and not enough real decisions to make but it works well for a quick light game that supports up to six.

Hands-down my favorite new game is Runewars by Fantasy Flight Games. It is a fantasy-themed territory control style game. There are four different factions and each player is working to try and control dragon runes on the board. The game is over either at the end of the sixth year or when someone controls six runes (with options for a longer game if you want).

The game is friggin' fantastic. There are sort of three things going on. First, you have armies marching around the board, fighting to control land and hold the territories with runes in them. Second, you have heroes you may hire that run around the map independently of your armies hopefully finding you more runes and messing with your opponents. Finally there's resource management as you collect influence that may be spent when bidding for new runes to place on the map and other events that pop up.

Everything works together incredibly well and plays faster than other similar games while keeping a really epic feel. The map is modular and players build the map to start the game so there's a fun, strategic element to that as well. Plus it just looks cool as hell set up with all the plastic army units, gorgeous tiles and even some cool 3D terrain just for looks. You have lots of tough decisions to make and you generally need to be somewhat aggressive but there are plenty of different ways to get the runes you need to win.

Once I get a few more plays under my belt, it may surpass Twilight Imperium 3 as my favorite game which is no small feat!

Tales of the Arabian Nights was just a blast. And I agree...it's a game that will probably be played only a few times a year, on special occasions. It's really fun, and unique, but I don't want it to wear out its welcome. With some good friends, good food, and good beer, though, it's just a fantastic experience.

So - Runewars is good, eh? I do really like FFG. Arkham Horror is one that we've really grown to love the past few months. I also just got a set of cards that makes Descent more like Warhammer Quest, so I'm looking forward to trying that.

How long is a full game of Runewars? I will probably end up picking that up. Your enthusiastic response has moved me one step closer in that direction. It's just too cool looking not to. Even if I dislike, I'm sure I can put all those bits to good use in a D&D4ed. game, which is what I use all my Descent stuff for.

Has anyone played the Game of Thrones LCG (or CCG before it)? I've played two games so far, haven't messed with any deck customization, and I'm not sure if I like it or not. Feels very chaotic, which I suppose is appropriate given the theme, but perhaps too much so. I do enjoy that you can make feints and ambushes and the like, and it's nice to execute a plan, but it hasn't yet clicked with me.

I'll have to check out Ghost Stories, as I love a good co-op game, and that's a wonderful theme. Asmodee makes some beautiful games, too.

With our group it seems like Runewars takes about an hour per player although I certainly think it could be less. We tend to play games a little on the slower side as we socialize as much as we play and get a little AP. I think 2-4 hours is probably about right though. Far as gameplay goes, I'd liken it to Shogun (Queen Games version, not the old Gamemaster Series Samurai Swords) if you've played that. Has a lot of similar concepts and seems to take about the same amount of time. I really like what I've seen so far and it's been quite awhile since I've had a game consume my thoughts like this

Descent has started to lose its luster for me. I really like what Road to Legend brought to the game but it still has some core mechanics that don't quite strike the chord I want. Plus with RtL you really want a steady group of five players and we never seem to hit that. We had a brief stint where we were into the game pretty heavily but then one guy moved and it went back on the shelf. I'd be curious to hear what you think of the Warhammer Quest variant works. Saw that on BGG and never gave it too much of a look but I'd love to hear if it plays well.

You guys are more hardcore than I, but I do enjoy some Puerto Rico and Carcassonne. Carcassonne is light for sure, but fun and rewarding enough. I recently bought Agricola and Power Grid but I don't have anyone in my circle who knows how to play, so both of them keep getting put off until another time.

We tried Arkham Horror a few times but really hated the feel of it. It was us against the rules and dice, usually losing miserably after hours. No one liked it. Settlers is up next to learn.

The wife and I have enjoyed Odin's Ravens, Bohnanza, and Lost Cities.

7inchsplit wrote:

Has anyone played the Game of Thrones LCG (or CCG before it)? I've played two games so far, haven't messed with any deck customization, and I'm not sure if I like it or not.

I'll have to check out Ghost Stories, as I love a good co-op game, and that's a wonderful theme. Asmodee makes some beautiful games, too.

I have not played any of the LCGs yet. Although I have the Cthulhu one, with some expansions, and my friend has the GoT one. Just haven't gotten these to the table yet. I've heard mixed things. I'm buying the Cthulhu one mainly because I'm a Lovecraft/mythos/weird fiction nut.

I cannot recommend Ghost Stories enough.

Kilaban wrote:

We tried Arkham Horror a few times but really hated the feel of it. It was us against the rules and dice, usually losing miserably after hours. No one liked it.

Don't give up on Arkham Horror. It took my group 2 years to "get it," but now it's one of our favorites. Don't play to win, either. Play just to have a good time, and sometimes the best times are in loosing badly! We like to think of it more as a light GM-less RPG, and play it as such, getting into character, and developing the narrative of the game as we go. It's quite brilliant.

Dreaded Gazebo wrote:

Descent has started to lose its luster for me. I really like what Road to Legend brought to the game but it still has some core mechanics that don't quite strike the chord I want. Plus with RtL you really want a steady group of five players and we never seem to hit that. We had a brief stint where we were into the game pretty heavily but then one guy moved and it went back on the shelf. I'd be curious to hear what you think of the Warhammer Quest variant works. Saw that on BGG and never gave it too much of a look but I'd love to hear if it plays well.

We still really like Descent, although we hate Road to Legend. Great bits, though.

Descent only gets played a couple of times a year, simply because it is so dang long. But when we play it we have fun. And we, too, socialize as much as we play, so that adds to the length. My only problem with Descent is that as the Overlord, I never play to win, but instead I play to facilitate a good time. This is because of my RPG roots.

Dreaded Gazebo wrote:

Hands-down my favorite new game is Runewars by Fantasy Flight Games. It is a fantasy-themed territory control style game. There are four different factions and each player is working to try and control dragon runes on the board. The game is over either at the end of the sixth year or when someone controls six runes (with options for a longer game if you want).

The game is friggin' fantastic. There are sort of three things going on. First, you have armies marching around the board, fighting to control land and hold the territories with runes in them. Second, you have heroes you may hire that run around the map independently of your armies hopefully finding you more runes and messing with your opponents. Finally there's resource management as you collect influence that may be spent when bidding for new runes to place on the map and other events that pop up.

Everything works together incredibly well and plays faster than other similar games while keeping a really epic feel. The map is modular and players build the map to start the game so there's a fun, strategic element to that as well. Plus it just looks cool as hell set up with all the plastic army units, gorgeous tiles and even some cool 3D terrain just for looks. You have lots of tough decisions to make and you generally need to be somewhat aggressive but there are plenty of different ways to get the runes you need to win.

That sounds like an epic, crunchy Small World, but maybe that's only because I've been playing SW recently. It sounds awesome though! Not that I can afford to buy/sneak past the girlfriend another big box game, but how about how long does set-up take? I love the look and feel of War of the Ring, but damn if it doesn't take half the play time just to place all the bits.

A new board gaming thread? Sweet. Can someone school me on the quality of the new Risk?

Gravey wrote:

That sounds like an epic, crunchy Small World, but maybe that's only because I've been playing SW recently. It sounds awesome though! Not that I can afford to buy/sneak past the girlfriend another big box game, but how about how long does set-up take? I love the look and feel of War of the Ring, but damn if it doesn't take half the play time just to place all the bits.

Imagine Small World but you only play one race, make the board modular and put things on the board that players are fighting over instead of just bashing each other and yeah, I guess that is kinda like Runewars

Setup isn't too bad, especially if you have everything bagged and boxed up nicely. I use Plano boxes to keep all the units sorted which really helps. Building the board is part of the game, too, so setup is partially playing the game! Nowhere near the setup of War of the Ring. Maybe 10 minutes with building the board? It'll probably take twice that your first time but once you get it down and everyone understands how building the board works it goes quickly.

I have a very atypical experience with Arkham Horror. Probably spent an hour going over the rules and some event came up that one of my friends got to roll some dice and see if he closed the only portal on the board. He managed to roll like mad, bam, closed the portal. We won. Quite possibly the shortest game of Arkham Horror ever. I think I may retire and keep my 100% win average!

(In hindsight I think we played whatever card that was wrong but it was still great at the time :))

Played Chaos in the Old World and Space Alert tonight at the game shop. Liked both. Might pick up Chaos. Space Alert was fun to play, but I wouldn't want to be the guy running things, so I don't think I'll buy that one.

I picked Small World up on sale at Funagain games in December and I'm glad I did. I couldn't justify $50 for it, but at $30 it's been a good, relatively fast and light game. It definitely skews to the light end of the scale though - good for people who don't play games too often, or just like picking a wacky race/power combo to try out. If you want a lot of strategic depth and involved rules, look elsewhere. I can see how it might not have staying power for a group of experienced boardgamers.

I've been enjoying Race for the Galaxy with my slightly more boardgame-savvy friends, which has been another good pickup.

I'm looking forward to the re-release of Through the Desert - I haven't played it before but I've wanted to for a while.

I was given a copy of Agricola last year and I still haven't played it. I sat down with the rules once and struggled through them, but didn't have anyone around to play with. I'm still willing to give it a shot, but I would consider trading it away for a game I know I'd enjoy. Having someone who already knew how to play would make it easier to get into the game. Sometimes it's tough being that guy.

I just picked up a copy of Labyrinth, and it looks like it has the potential to be a fantastic light game. Playing with 3 or 4 players, there is a good amount of screwing other folks over (by accident or on purpose), the rules take about a minute to explain, games are short, and you can still have a conversation and a beer while playing.

The other light game that's been a fixture for the past year or so is Ticket to Ride. Straight forward, with enough luck to make it seem like anyone's game and enough strategy to make it not really. Personally, I like the European board, although the base game is much better with a) the cards from the 1904 expansion, and b) custom tickets, which can be created and printed via various websites (linked on the BGG page). We've found that slight rule tweaks -- mainly how many destination tickets you pick up/keep on any given turn -- every game help keep it surprisingly fresh.

I'm late to the board game party and have only recently played some classic games (Outside of the Xbox Live Arcade versions) like Settlers of Catan and Carcassonne for the first time. I've always been a Munchkin fan but only now have a good group that likes it.

That brings me to my current favorite: Dominion (as reviewed by our friends at The Escapist)

Holy crap is this game balanced and strategic and fun. I'm sure many here are familiar but Ill go over the basics anyways. The game comes with 25 decks of cards and during each game you'll pick any 10 of them to play with. Every player will start with the same deck, 7 copper cards and 3 Victory Point cards worth 1 point each. They'll draw a hand of 5 cards from their shuffled deck of 10 and use the coins to buy from the 10 decks of cards, buy more money, or buy more victory point cards.

Since your decks all start the same, and you're drafting new cards from the same pool, it's very well balanced. The outcome is determined by how you play your cards and a little bit of luck from which cards you own that you draw into your hand at any given time. By eliminating clutter from your deck, you can have a lean-mean-Victory Point buying machine.

GAAAAAAH! I promised myself no more new board games but that Runewars is tempting.

Gazebo, in comparison to Twilight how much more or less complex are the rules in your opinion? I'm downloading them now to skim at lunch.

Wembley wrote:

A new board gaming thread? Sweet. Can someone school me on the quality of the new Risk?

The new Risk is fun and fast paced thanks to the objectives. One of the front-pagers did a write-up on it awhile ago (Black Ops is the limited edition of the new version) *clicky*

As to new games, my group tried Space Alert over the holiday and it was pretty fun. Its a coop space ship simulater that features lots of frantic table talk as you deal with threats in real time. Nice quick games once you wrap your head around the mechanics.

I just started playing board games within the past year, and have managed to get most of my family hooked on Settlers of Catan - even the family members I never would have thought would enjoy board games. They didn't like Pandemic as much, but we've only played it once.

I've been wanting to pick up something new for a few months now and had it narrowed down to either Ticket to Ride or Power Grid. Luckily, my decision was made for me when Power Grip popped up on tanga.com a week or so ago. We've yet to play it, but I'm looking forward to giving it a try. Hopefully my wife and the rest of my family finds it more enjoyable than they did Pandemic.

Wembley wrote:

A new board gaming thread? Sweet. Can someone school me on the quality of the new Risk?

If you're talking about the recent (2008) release that wasn't a Risk: Variant type, I can vouch for it being the same old Risk, but with the option of including "objectives" that move the game along to a pace that can finish within an hour or two.

Then again, a number of us are fairly friendly with and fans of Rob Daviau (the designer), so there may be some bias here.

If you're looking for a newer Risk, that maybe isn't actually Risk, might I suggest you track down a copy of Nexus-Ops?

Nexus-Ops is really fun, has some good tactical decisions, and also includes some light resource management and a module board.

The games are also pretty short, and can be made shorter through a number of options.

Chumpy_McChump wrote:

I just picked up a copy of Labyrinth, and it looks like it has the potential to be a fantastic light game. Playing with 3 or 4 players, there is a good amount of screwing other folks over (by accident or on purpose), the rules take about a minute to explain, games are short, and you can still have a conversation and a beer while playing.

Yeah - that's a cool game.

You may also want to check out Tsuro. It's a maze-like game in which the object is to be the last man standing. It's quite fun, the games are short, and it's under $30.

Scaphism wrote:

I picked Small World up on sale at Funagain games in December and I'm glad I did. I couldn't justify $50 for it, but at $30 it's been a good, relatively fast and light game. It definitely skews to the light end of the scale though - good for people who don't play games too often, or just like picking a wacky race/power combo to try out. If you want a lot of strategic depth and involved rules, look elsewhere. I can see how it might not have staying power for a group of experienced boardgamers.

I've been enjoying Race for the Galaxy with my slightly more boardgame-savvy friends, which has been another good pickup.


Small World
and Race for the Galaxy are great. I think Small World has a lot more depth than many people give it credit for. Sure it has a light theme, and some luck involved in how the races and powers are combined, but there are still a number of important decisions to be made, especially in a 5 player game. It's one of those simple to learn, hard to master games.

RftG is a blast. Although, it is one of those group solitaire games; you're really just playing against yourself, but that's cool. Lots of good strategy.

D_Davis wrote:

You may also want to check out Tsuro. It's a maze-like game in which the object is to be the last man standing. It's quite fun, the games are short, and it's under $30.

What I like about Tsuro is that you can teach the game in about 30 seconds and play a full game in 20 minutes.

RichyRambo wrote:

Gazebo, in comparison to Twilight how much more or less complex are the rules in your opinion? I'm downloading them now to skim at lunch.

I think the rules for Runewars are a little less complex than Twilight Imperium. There's actually a little bit more going on the board with armies, heroes, neutral units and runes to capture but the overall structure of the game is easier. No tech trees to worry about, everyone just chooses the action they want to perform (rather than the Puerto Rico-esque role selection) and you only do four actions per year. Combat is also easier and faster as it only lasts for a single round and you draw cards to resolve which is very easy to do.

Once you start playing it will click pretty quickly, especially since the game moves fast. Twilight Imperium can be challenging because you explain something at the beginning but it takes a good hour or so before people really even start butting heads and by then they forgot how everything works! So while the rules aren't significantly less complex than TI3 I think they are much easier for new players to grasp.

Wembley wrote:

As to new games, my group tried Space Alert over the holiday and it was pretty fun. Its a coop space ship simulater that features lots of frantic table talk as you deal with threats in real time. Nice quick games once you wrap your head around the mechanics.

Space Alert is awesome! It is is crazy, chaotic, random and tons of fun. I love watching how horribly wrong things go during the resolve and it is even better when you are pleasantly surprised that something worked Then there's always that moment of realization that you just screwed everything up... so good. Vlaada Chvatil has pretty much become my go-to designer; if he comes out with something I'm fairly confident I'll enjoy it.

Which takes me to another new game I played recently: Dungeon Lords, Vlaada's take on worker placement games. The game takes place over two years and each player is an evil overlord trying to build up his or her dungeon to fend off the heroes that will come romping through at the end of the year. You dig tunnels, build rooms, hire monsters and get traps over the course of the year. As the year progresses you will be assigned heroes with the weaker ones going to the "less evil" overlords and the stronger ones going to the "more evil" overlords. Then they start walking through your dungeons, razing the halls and rooms as your monsters try and imprison them.

The first part of the game is pretty standard worker placement fare but it does a good job of evoking the theme. You need to collect gold and food to hire and pay for your monsters and get more minions to dig tunnels and mine for gold. Different actions move you up and down on the Evilometer so you need to manage that while accomplishing whatever you need to do to prep yourself for the end of the year.

Then the heroes march through and the game takes a whole new form. They are going to make four attacks, meaning they will possibly raze a total of four spaces in your dungeon unless you can capture them. There are different types of heroes, too: fighters stand in front to soak up hits, clerics heal the heroes when they take damage, rogues help counter the effects of traps you play on them and wizards can cast powerful spells. Generally the heroes are pretty powerful and it seemed tough to defend against them so you sit and watch as everyone just gets stomped by the heroes, occasionally capturing one (which nets you points at the end of the game).

My only real "issue" with the game is that like many others it just has a ton of ways to earn points at the end. You get points for most rooms, most tunnels, most minions, most this and that, etc. I'm not always keen on games where it feels like you just kinda get points out of the blue at the end but I thought the process of playing made up for that. In a way it was more about the experience than the final scores (which were mostly negative :lol:). We've only played once so far though... will see how it holds up with repeated plays.

D_Davis wrote:

You may also want to check out Tsuro. It's a maze-like game in which the object is to be the last man standing. It's quite fun, the games are short, and it's under $30.

Tsuro is great. That and Labyrinth are two of my wife's favorite games. Really easy to play but still a lot of fun. I think I've had the most success getting "non-gamers" to play Tsuro since it looks great and is so incredibly easy to teach and play.

Also seconding Nexus Ops, although it isn't in print any more so it might be tough to find. I love it because you can get some crazy come-from-behind victories and the game is all about being on the offensive. If you just want to have some quick fun bashing the crap out of your opponents, Nexus Ops is the way to go

Breander has my copy of Carcassonne and I love it! I really want to get into some more board games and there are a lot of ones I want to try you guys have mentioned. My problem is there really isn't anyone around here interested enough to play with me.

Dreaded Gazebo wrote:

Tsuro is great. That and Labyrinth are two of my wife's favorite games. Really easy to play but still a lot of fun. I think I've had the most success getting "non-gamers" to play Tsuro since it looks great and is so incredibly easy to teach and play.

Also seconding Nexus Ops, although it isn't in print any more so it might be tough to find. I love it because you can get some crazy come-from-behind victories and the game is all about being on the offensive. If you just want to have some quick fun bashing the crap out of your opponents, Nexus Ops is the way to go :)

Tsuro does look great. Just opening up and seeing the nicely folded instructions, and the rice-paper-like insert is fun.

I forgot that Nexus Ops is OOP. That sucks. Hopefully someone will pick it up. I heard that someone picked up Betrayal at House on the Hill, for a reprint. That game is super flawed, but super fun. Some of the best gaming experiences I've ever had are with that game, especially with some light role-playing and narrative building.

Last night my indie RPG group did a boardgame night. We played Pandemic (we lost) and an early-ending Dominion (I won).

I recently bought Pandemic for our work lunchtime sessions, and stone me it's hard to win. We find it hard to get the right balance between meeting up to get cards for cures and clearing outbreaks. We keep dying due to the number of outbreaks, and seemingly benign areas with a cube next to three cubes (where the three cube node is in the discard pile), one gets an epidemic and all hell breaks loose when the same thing comes right back out the top. And that's on easy level with open hands and chosen roles. We have a ways to go, I think.

Thanks for the heads up on Tsuro. I've never heard of it before, but anything that works with up to 8 people is welcome. I typically invite 3-4 people over to play games but that number easily and often balloons up to 6-8 people.

I also picked up Saboteur which plays up to 10 people, and is like a co-op pipe dream type game. You play dwarf miners trying to dig their way to treasure, with a variable number of well, saboteurs acting against the group. It plays fast, which is good, because it's also not terribly deep. Definitely not a game that can hold attention of a group for the entire evening/night. Then again, it was only $10, and a good "oh crap, we have too many people over now."

Kilaban wrote:

I recently bought Agricola and Power Grid but I don't have anyone in my circle who knows how to play, so both of them keep getting put off until another time.

Power Grid is a fun game - I like the auction mechanics and it does a good job of keeping scores close without feeling like it overly penalizes experienced players or handicaps newer players too much.
That said, it does take a while to play, especially with more people, and it requires some accounting (arithmetic) every round.

D_Davis - you might want to check out The Victory Lounge on a Monday night - there's often some goodjers playing there.

Check the thread!

Thought I'd share something from our session last night. A regular showed up with his girlfriend, a Yale Divinity School student. The typical banter was not tempered by her presence At one point playing Dominion I had tons of curses so wanted to buy/build some Chapels to clear them out. I yelled out "I gotta get some chapel erection going on here!" I really meant the construction meaning, but it was too late.

Funniest gaming moment we've had so far. It was a great time. No word on if she's coming back next week, heh.