Book Recommendations?

LeapingGnome wrote:
DSGamer wrote:
I read A Canticle for Leibowitz on vacation based on some love it got here. Are there any other books like that? And by that I mean Sci-Fi + grand scope of time + post apocalyptic.

It's not on kindle?

No. I had to buy an ebook elsewhere and convert it. Odd.

muraii wrote:
Folks, just...okay, um. The next Walking Dead novel is due out next month. The first, The Walking Dead: Rise of the Governor, was incredibly well-crafted and better written than the comics (and so, necessarily, better than the AMC show).
I can't wait.

I'm having trouble finding information about this. Are there regular ol' Walking Dead *novels* (not graphic novels)? Are they side-stories, or do they tell a non-pictorial version of the comics? or of the show? Or are they an entirely different entity? Do they spoil events of either the comics or the show? *confused*

While we're on the subject of post-apocalyptic settings, I've been reading Soft Apocalypse by Will McIntosh, and it's quite good so far...though it's more mid-apocalypse than post-apocalypse. The novel follows a group of friends across a decade and through the collapse of western civilization, as economic decline and resource scarcity slowly turn the United States into a scene from Mad Max.

Puce Moose wrote:
muraii wrote:
Folks, just...okay, um. The next Walking Dead novel is due out next month. The first, The Walking Dead: Rise of the Governor, was incredibly well-crafted and better written than the comics (and so, necessarily, better than the AMC show).
I can't wait.

I'm having trouble finding information about this. Are there regular ol' Walking Dead *novels* (not graphic novels)? Are they side-stories, or do they tell a non-pictorial version of the comics? or of the show? Or are they an entirely different entity? Do they spoil events of either the comics or the show? *confused*

Kirkman decided to work with novelist Bonansinga on three real novels set in the TWD world. The first tells the story of The Governor, a fairly major character thus far in the comics. The second tells the story of a woman whose name doesn't ring a bell.

Therefore, the first is essentially the origin story of a major character. It starts near the beginning of the apocalypse. I don't think it's very spoilery at all.

The first is written with very human grit and without the bombast of the comics. Maybe comics, as a medium, need bombast in the same way that plays typically need heavy make-up. I have high hopes for the second book.

ruhk wrote:
While we're on the subject of post-apocalyptic settings, I've been reading Soft Apocalypse by Will McIntosh, and it's quite good so far...though it's more mid-apocalypse than post-apocalypse. The novel follows a group of friends across a decade and through the collapse of western civilization, as economic decline and resource scarcity slowly turn the United States into a scene from Mad Max.

MUST READINGS!!!

muraii wrote:

Kirkman decided to work with novelist Bonansinga on three real novels set in the TWD world. The first tells the story of The Governor, a fairly major character thus far in the comics. The second tells the story of a woman whose name doesn't ring a bell.

Therefore, the first is essentially the origin story of a major character. It starts near the beginning of the apocalypse. I don't think it's very spoilery at all.

The first is written with very human grit and without the bombast of the comics. Maybe comics, as a medium, need bombast in the same way that plays typically need heavy make-up. I have high hopes for the second book.

Reading it from the link you had, if that is the second book and Lilly is the woman whose name doesn't ring a bell, she is in the comics but isn't a major player and she is also a major character in the recent telltale games.

ruhk wrote:
While we're on the subject of post-apocalyptic settings, I've been reading Soft Apocalypse by Will McIntosh, and it's quite good so far...though it's more mid-apocalypse than post-apocalypse. The novel follows a group of friends across a decade and through the collapse of western civilization, as economic decline and resource scarcity slowly turn the United States into a scene from Mad Max.

Ugh, I hated that book. It's the post-apocalyptic book equivalent of a torture porn horror movie. My 1-star Amazon review: http://www.amazon.com/review/R2KWM8F...

onewild wrote:
muraii wrote:

Kirkman decided to work with novelist Bonansinga on three real novels set in the TWD world. The first tells the story of The Governor, a fairly major character thus far in the comics. The second tells the story of a woman whose name doesn't ring a bell.

Therefore, the first is essentially the origin story of a major character. It starts near the beginning of the apocalypse. I don't think it's very spoilery at all.

The first is written with very human grit and without the bombast of the comics. Maybe comics, as a medium, need bombast in the same way that plays typically need heavy make-up. I have high hopes for the second book.

Reading it from the link you had, if that is the second book and Lilly is the woman whose name doesn't ring a bell, she is in the comics but isn't a major player and she is also a major character in the recent telltale games.

Lilly it is. I have read through issues 1-85 or so twice, once relatively recently in a couple o' days (versus incrementally like the first time). I still can't keep a lot of the names straight. Once more into the fray!

BadKen wrote:
ruhk wrote:
While we're on the subject of post-apocalyptic settings, I've been reading Soft Apocalypse by Will McIntosh, and it's quite good so far...though it's more mid-apocalypse than post-apocalypse. The novel follows a group of friends across a decade and through the collapse of western civilization, as economic decline and resource scarcity slowly turn the United States into a scene from Mad Max.

Ugh, I hated that book. It's the post-apocalyptic book equivalent of a torture porn horror movie. My 1-star Amazon review: http://www.amazon.com/review/R2KWM8F...

Uneven comments on your review, but I think The Road, while not Disneyesque, was not as desperate or dire as I expected. The grue is evenly balanced by the father-son love, and the ending...well, it's an ending I found strangely disappointing.

Soft Apocalypse may swing too far but I'll probably try it out.

I'm about 3/4 of the way through it and I don't think it's THAT bad in terms of violence... I find it to be less violent than a certain popular fantasy series that has inspired a certain popular tv show, perhaps the violence in Soft Apocalypse is just a bit more affecting because the setting is more relatable.

As for the dog violence- frankly I could have used a few MORE dogbombs.

ruhk wrote:
I'm about 3/4 of the way through it and I don't think it's THAT bad in terms of violence... I find it to be less violent than a certain popular fantasy series that has inspired a certain popular tv show

Perry Mason?

Yes. Exactly.

"Miss Stark, could you tell the court, in your own words, what exactly transpired on the day that Lady was killed?"

Hypatian wrote:
"Miss Stark, could you tell the court, in your own words, what exactly transpired on the day that Lady was killed?"

Um, whatever the Lannisters said happened is probably right. By the way, I'm a haughty bitch.

BadKen wrote:
ruhk wrote:
While we're on the subject of post-apocalyptic settings, I've been reading Soft Apocalypse by Will McIntosh, and it's quite good so far...though it's more mid-apocalypse than post-apocalypse. The novel follows a group of friends across a decade and through the collapse of western civilization, as economic decline and resource scarcity slowly turn the United States into a scene from Mad Max.

Ugh, I hated that book. It's the post-apocalyptic book equivalent of a torture porn horror movie. My 1-star Amazon review: http://www.amazon.com/review/R2KWM8F...

Ooof... Thanks for the heads-up. We're in accord on the kind of things that really hit the 'yuck' switch. It immediately called to mind a .. I think it was a John Saul book, where a child was rubbing the decaying carcass of a cat on another child's crotch. I was done at that point. When things have gotten that bad, I just don't want to read about it anymore.

So I'm about a third of the way through Tad Williams' The Dirty Streets of Heaven and it has been all kinds of awesome so far. I'm used to more detail in Williams' books, but this page-turner style of writing seems to suit him well.

Looking for a recommendation: I need a good, entertaining history book on African explorers (Livingstone, Stanley). Or, more generally, on imperialism and colonisation in Africa. Or, even more generally, just a good not too dry history of Africa with focus on 19th & 20th century history.

UCRC wrote:
Looking for a recommendation: I need a good, entertaining history book on African explorers (Livingstone, Stanley). Or, more generally, on imperialism and colonisation in Africa. Or, even more generally, just a good not too dry history of Africa with focus on 19th & 20th century history.

First one that comes to mind is: http://www.amazon.com/King-Leopolds-... Is there a particular region in Africa or a particular colonizing foreign power that you want to focus on?

I've enjoyed Byron Farwell's books, specifically "Queen Victoria's Little Wars" and "Eminent Victorian Soldiers: Seekers of Glory". He also wrote biographies of Stanley and Burton.

If you're looking for "good, not too dry" history, try George MacDonald Fraser's Flashman books. Heh. Definitely not dry, and they will teach you a lot of accurate, interesting history.

"The Washing of the Spears" is my favorite Zulu history. Zooming to the 20th century, Frederick Forsyth made his name with "The Biafra Story: Making of a Modern Legend" about the attempt of the Ibo to secede from Nigeria in 1970. And I'm looking at Thomas Pakenham's "The Scramble for Africa" as a read sooner or later.

Robear wrote:
I've enjoyed Byron Farwell's books, specifically "Queen Victoria's Little Wars" and "Eminent Victorian Soldiers: Seekers of Glory". He also wrote biographies of Stanley and Burton.

If you're looking for "good, not too dry" history, try George MacDonald Fraser's Flashman books. Heh. Definitely not dry, and they will teach you a lot of accurate, interesting history.

"The Washing of the Spears" is my favorite Zulu history. Zooming to the 20th century, Frederick Forsyth made his name with "The Biafra Story: Making of a Modern Legend" about the attempt of the Ibo to secede from Nigeria in 1970. And I'm looking at Thomas Pakenham's "The Scramble for Africa" as a read sooner or later.

That's the only one I've read, but it was a very good overview of the period.

I am reading through the compiled writings of Henry Ford titled The International Jew. Originally he released the writings in the paper he published from Dearborn.

You need to be a fan of controversial writings.

What is alarming to me is how much of what he and others, like Hitler, wrote about in the 20's survives nearly 100 years later. Some of the seasoning changes, but the recipe is much the same.

It is by no means easy to read, sensibility wise, but neither is Downfall or Schindler's List easy to watch. But above all else, see how easy it is to substitute hate for reason and logic.

Thanks, Tanglebones, that's good to know.

"Fate of Africa" by Meredith and to echo two that I have read above: "King Leopold's Ghost" and "Eminent Victorian Soldiers"

"Skagboys", by Irvine Welsh, was released on Monday in the US. It's a prequel to "Trainspotting" and "Porno", and if you've never read Welsh, he's a treat. (But if you are not fond of explicit material, probably leave Welsh well enough alone. It's the story of four friends and how they descend into heroin addiction in 1980's Edinburgh.)

I've had a great time with The Island by Michael Stark. You can read a good chunk of the book for free. I didn't know anything about the series going into it (I urge you to do the same!) , but with the broadest of strokes I'll say it deals with a... Nah, I don't want to spoil it. Just read the thing! Don't read the reviews, or even the preview, or the reader comments, or even the book description if possible. Tunnel your vision to the 'buy with 1 click' (free, remember?) , read the free chapters, and go from there. The less you know going into it, the better. Through an unexpected bit of coincidence I managed to start reading it with no background info, and it's been an interesting ride.

Staked wrote:
So I'm about a third of the way through Tad Williams' The Dirty Streets of Heaven and it has been all kinds of awesome so far. I'm used to more detail in Williams' books, but this page-turner style of writing seems to suit him well.

Bought of this recommendation and loving it - thanks.

Thanks for all Africa recommendations! Put some of them on waiting list.

Skagboys lives up to expectations. Definitely not for the squeamish, or those who dislike books written in dialect. (If you can't readily understand Scots dialects, skip it.) Great book, though, so far, especially for Trainspotting fans. I may have to re-read that and Porno eftir ah'm done wi this yin.

I've been considering getting back into the Riftwar books from Ray Feist. I took a break from them a while ago and left off just before the Serpentwar Saga. Can anyone out there who has read past that tell me if it's worth it to continue?

padriec wrote:
I've been considering getting back into the Riftwar books from Ray Feist. I took a break from them a while ago and left off just before the Serpentwar Saga. Can anyone out there who has read past that tell me if it's worth it to continue?

...

I loved the Riftwar books, back in the day, but they only hold up slightly better than Eddings. I say this as a person who was on the Feistfans-L list back in the day, and used to go by the handle Milamber.