Book Recommendations?

NathanialG wrote:

You seem to have misquoted me!

Who me? {whistles innocently}

Oso wrote:

I'm looking for good post-apocalyptic settings as well. Anyone read Colson Whitehead's Zone One? I'm really intrigued by this since Whitehead isn't a genre author and his The Intuitionist was a damn fine book.

I read Zone One a couple of months ago. I haven't read anything else by Whitehead, but it's not typical genre fiction, which is good and bad depending on your approach. The book really isn't plot-driven at all, it's more a study of one bland character and the tales (mostly flashbacks) of the other characters he bumped into while surviving. There were also some rapid shifts between these stories without a clear transition, creating some confusion.

On the bright side, his writing is really strong. I'm not sure how to describe it - perhaps it's more "literary" than typical genre fiction. I probably wouldn't read it again, but it was worth finishing and isn't too long.

I'm also a little over halfway through the Justin Cronin's The Passage. So far it's a bit odd - after the first third there is a rapid setting shift that is hard to adapt to. It seems like the reviews are slightly polarized and it's yet to be determined which side I'm on.

fuzzyb wrote:

I'm also a little over halfway through the Justin Cronin's The Passage. So far it's a bit odd - after the first third there is a rapid setting shift that is hard to adapt to. It seems like the reviews are slightly polarized and it's yet to be determined which side I'm on.

I loved The Passage but agree that the setting shift took a little while to get into. Really looking forward to the sequel coming out this fall called The Twelve.

Here are my arguments for Hornby: his stuff gets better as he ages and whatever sparks of brilliance he showed in his early stuff are still there, but are tempered and quieted by being a grown-up. I read A Long Way Down on a whim and was impressed by his restraint. What pushed me over the edge was reading Juliet, Naked this summer. If you haven't read it, I recommend it as a short novel that has the possibility of rehabilitating Hornby. He's no longer writing apologies for asshole guys who are charming and smart. Now, at least in Juliet, he's examining the consequences of being a charming genius asshole and he's honest and stark in the consequences of that lifestyle.

I'll have to check out Juliet, Naked. But I didn't care for A Long Way Down. It felt too surface and facile. I don't remember anything about it beyond that, actually. I liked About A Boy quite a bit at the time, though. It had real bite to it.

fuzzyb wrote:
Oso wrote:

I'm looking for good post-apocalyptic settings as well. Anyone read Colson Whitehead's Zone One? I'm really intrigued by this since Whitehead isn't a genre author and his The Intuitionist was a damn fine book.

I read Zone One a couple of months ago. I haven't read anything else by Whitehead, but it's not typical genre fiction, which is good and bad depending on your approach. The book really isn't plot-driven at all, it's more a study of one bland character and the tales (mostly flashbacks) of the other characters he bumped into while surviving. There were also some rapid shifts between these stories without a clear transition, creating some confusion.

On the bright side, his writing is really strong. I'm not sure how to describe it - perhaps it's more "literary" than typical genre fiction. I probably wouldn't read it again, but it was worth finishing and isn't too long.

I read Whitehead's Intuitionist for a class on political literature during college. I enjoyed it too but he was definitely writing for writing's sake. He and Didion were the most literary of the books we read, and he struggled with the transitions in that book as well. Maybe its a stylistic thing, but that's the only book of his that we read.

Intriguing that he's done a post-apocalyptic story, as that didn't seem like his M.O. from what I read, so I need to re-think the model I had of him. I might check this out.

I forgot who recommended it many pages back, but I finally started The Rook by Daniel O'Malley.

If it keeps up the pace it has set over the first few chapters I'm going to be a very tired fellow at work tomorrow morning.

On another note, has anyone read Feed by Mira Grant? It looks intriguing, but I saw that she also writes under the name Seanan McGuire. That has kept from picking it up thus far since her Discount Armageddon was a whole lotta meh for me.

Staked wrote:

I forgot who recommended it many pages back, but I finally started The Rook by Daniel O'Malley.

If it keeps up the pace it has set over the first few chapters I'm going to be a very tired fellow at work tomorrow morning.

On another note, has anyone read Feed by Mira Grant? It looks intriguing, but I saw that she also writes under the name Seanan McGuire. That has kept from picking it up thus far since her Discount Armageddon was a whole lotta meh for me.

The Rook was pretty good. Nice character development.

I'd say Feed and Discount Armageddon share similar writing. Feed is a more adult novel, more going on, and I found it more interesting, but I enjoyed both of them.

On another note, has anyone read Feed by Mira Grant? It looks intriguing, but I saw that she also writes under the name Seanan McGuire. That has kept from picking it up thus far since her Discount Armageddon was a whole lotta meh for me.

I read that whole trilogy and enjoyed. Pick up Feed and give it a try!

Just want to make sure people here are reading 14 by Peter Clines. Great read!

Wanted to say thanks for the recommendation of "The Spy Who Came In From The Cold.". Watched the Richard Burton movie afterwards, which is fantastic in its own right but pales in comparison to the book.

walterqchocobo wrote:
fuzzyb wrote:

I'm also a little over halfway through the Justin Cronin's The Passage. So far it's a bit odd - after the first third there is a rapid setting shift that is hard to adapt to. It seems like the reviews are slightly polarized and it's yet to be determined which side I'm on.

I loved The Passage but agree that the setting shift took a little while to get into. Really looking forward to the sequel coming out this fall called The Twelve.

+1 The Passage. It was a book that I went from love to confusion to worry to enjoyment on, and it's one of my favorite books of the past few years. I didn't like all of it, but it Gelled as a whole for me (though it didn't become a Zol). I enjoyed it best when it was less "leaping around kick-ass awesome-pants", and more "arrrr we're f*cked, just look at it. JUST LOOK AT IT!". I hope the Cromeister takes more inspiration from the first half of the novel than the second half for the sequel in terms of flow and i

Just want to make sure people here are reading 14 by Peter Clines. Great read!.

+1 in perpetuity! Man that's a great book.

A friend I grew up with just wrote a book about a pretty incredible experience she had, 'Bringing in Finn'. After almost giving up on having kids after several failed pregnancies, her mom (post-menopausal and 60 years old) volunteered to be a surrogate for her and her husband. Both she and her mom were on Oprah and Good Morning America after the pregnancy, so some of you may have heard about this.

The book swings between extreme emotions of depression and joy, but it really is an extraordinary story.

If anyone's interested, type Bringing In Finn into the amazon search bar at the side of the GWJ page.

Started Tigana on your reccomendation, and 5 chapters in I'm already feeling like I will enjoy this much more than the Tapestry Trilogy. I'm getting a Scott Lynch vibe from it (a huge plus for me), although that could just be the young male protagonist in a low-magic fantasy Italy.

I also started rereading The Dragons of Babel during a stint in a waiting room. That is still a fantastic book.

While I try to avoid double-purchasing books, I am excited to see that a reader can sync her progress between the Audible smart-phone app and a Kindle device. So if she starts out reading a book on Kindle, she can listen to it (starting exactly where she left off) during a commute, and then pick right up the next night on the Kindle.

http://www.audible.com/mt/wfs/narrow...

Quintin_Stone wrote:

Finished Alastair Reynold's Redemption Ark last night. Really like his work so far.

Saw this at Half Price Books last year and jotted it for future reading.

babakotia wrote:
Trashie wrote:

Ripped through Ship Breaker over the weekend. Fun YA stuff and feels like a light The Wind-up Girl though still pretty dark. Check it out. Picked up the companion as well: The Drowned Cities.

I enjoyed both Ship Breaker and The Drowned Cities, but wish Bacigalupi would get back to writing adult fiction. The Windup Girl was grittier and more complex, and more involving for it. I really like the setting of an energy-poor, biotech heavy future and would like to see it further explored.

Just finished Ship Breaker. I read infrequently and not quickly so it took a few weeks. I had found it independently of this thread, and independently of seeing the interesting book jacket for The Windup Girl. Now, knowing that TWG appears to be a slightly more mature book in the vein of TSB, I'm sure to pick up the former.

muraii wrote:
Quintin_Stone wrote:

Finished Alastair Reynold's Redemption Ark last night. Really like his work so far.

Saw this at Half Price Books last year and jotted it for future reading.

I loved Revelation Space, enjoyed Redemption Ark, and haven't gotten to Absolution Gap yet due to other friends who have finished the series being less than thrilled with the conclusion.

billt721 wrote:
muraii wrote:
Quintin_Stone wrote:

Finished Alastair Reynold's Redemption Ark last night. Really like his work so far.

Saw this at Half Price Books last year and jotted it for future reading.

I loved Revelation Space, enjoyed Redemption Ark, and haven't gotten to Absolution Gap yet due to other friends who have finished the series being less than thrilled with the conclusion.

Chasm City is excellent as well.

billt721 wrote:
muraii wrote:
Quintin_Stone wrote:

Finished Alastair Reynold's Redemption Ark last night. Really like his work so far.

Saw this at Half Price Books last year and jotted it for future reading.

I loved Revelation Space, enjoyed Redemption Ark, and haven't gotten to Absolution Gap yet due to other friends who have finished the series being less than thrilled with the conclusion.

Yeah. I found it very disappointing.

Folks, just...okay, um. The next Walking Dead novel is due out next month. The first, The Walking Dead: Rise of the Governor, was incredibly well-crafted and better written than the comics (and so, necessarily, better than the AMC show).

I can't wait.

I read A Canticle for Leibowitz on vacation based on some love it got here. Are there any other books like that? And by that I mean Sci-Fi + grand scope of time + post apocalyptic.

DSGamer wrote:

I read A Canticle for Leibowitz on vacation based on some love it got here. Are there any other books like that? And by that I mean Sci-Fi + grand scope of time + post apocalyptic.

Ilium and the follow up Olympos by Dan Simmons may be what you're looking for. If you like that style Hyperion would also be a good choice, although it's post singularity instead of post apoc. I relate these three books pretty closely.

Squee9 wrote:
DSGamer wrote:

I read A Canticle for Leibowitz on vacation based on some love it got here. Are there any other books like that? And by that I mean Sci-Fi + grand scope of time + post apocalyptic.

Ilium and the follow up Olympos by Dan Simmons may be what you're looking for. If you like that style Hyperion would also be a good choice, although it's post singularity instead of post apoc. I relate these three books pretty closely.

I've read both Hyperion and Illium. Not Olympos or the other Hyperion book, though.

Squee9 wrote:
DSGamer wrote:

I read A Canticle for Leibowitz on vacation based on some love it got here. Are there any other books like that? And by that I mean Sci-Fi + grand scope of time + post apocalyptic.

Ilium and the follow up Olympos by Dan Simmons may be what you're looking for. If you like that style Hyperion would also be a good choice, although it's post singularity instead of post apoc. I relate these three books pretty closely.

Also, personal favorites, the Book of the New Sun series by Gene Wolfe.

lostlobster wrote:

Also, personal favorites, the Book of the New Sun series by Gene Wolfe.

So good! I am about to start a reread of them!

NathanialG wrote:
lostlobster wrote:

Also, personal favorites, the Book of the New Sun series by Gene Wolfe.

So good! I am about to start a reread of them!

Haha I am on my third read right now (beginning of Castle of the Autarch)! They are fantastic and particularly good to re-read. There is so much layered detail to enjoy that I did not see or appreciate on my first (and even second) runs.

grobstein wrote:
NathanialG wrote:
lostlobster wrote:

Also, personal favorites, the Book of the New Sun series by Gene Wolfe.

So good! I am about to start a reread of them!

Haha I am on my third read right now (beginning of Castle of the Autarch)! They are fantastic and particularly good to re-read. There is so much layered detail to enjoy that I did not see or appreciate on my first (and even second) runs.

I need to re-read these again. It's been several years and they definitely give up more of themselves the more you read them.

I have been listening to "14" while I have been riding the train to/from work. :mind blown: great story.

NathanialG wrote:
lostlobster wrote:

Also, personal favorites, the Book of the New Sun series by Gene Wolfe.

So good! I am about to start a reread of them!

I have added them to my Audible wishlist.

Maybe after I finish the First Law series.

DSGamer wrote:

I read A Canticle for Leibowitz on vacation based on some love it got here. Are there any other books like that? And by that I mean Sci-Fi + grand scope of time + post apocalyptic.

It's not on kindle?