Book Recommendations?

Harrow the Ninth kindle edition on sale for 2.99 today on Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/Harrow-Ninth-...

It seems weird they have book 2 on sale but book 1 is still $10. If they want to get new readers it should be the reverse.

LeapingGnome wrote:

It seems weird they have book 2 on sale but book 1 is still $10. If they want to get new readers it should be the reverse.

This reminds me of a thought I've had very often in my e-book journey. Many authors now seem to have series spanning over 20 books. While it's nice that they sometimes have the first book of a series on sale, I go and check and I see 20+ books all for $7.99 or $9.99 or even $12.99 or more, I am discouraged to even buy the first book for $1.99 or even read it for free.

While there have been a couple of these series where I've been able to get all the books on sale by buying one one week and another a couple weeks later, etc., it seems to be the exception rather than the rule because there seems to be many authors of these ridiculously long series where it is *always* the first book, or maybe this weird occasion of the second book, I guess because the first book went on sale 18 months ago or something.

Now for physical books, I could go into a used bookstore and get nearly all of the books for a reasonable price, but not for e-books. I suppose my point is that I wish it was a lot easier to read series in e-book format. (E-books also seem to have fewer omnibus versions for series I actually want to read.)

LeapingGnome wrote:

It seems weird they have book 2 on sale but book 1 is still $10. If they want to get new readers it should be the reverse.

First one was on sale a while ago.
I’ve gotten all 21 Ellis Peters Brother Cadfael series over time on sale....most expensive was $2.99.
The sales rarely have a rhyme or reason.
And that’s why I have over 300 books in my “current reads” folder of my kindle

Don’t forget to check out library ebook collections for others in series.

MathGoddess wrote:
LeapingGnome wrote:

It seems weird they have book 2 on sale but book 1 is still $10. If they want to get new readers it should be the reverse.

First one was on sale a while ago.
I’ve gotten all 21 Ellis Peters Brother Cadfael series over time on sale....most expensive was $2.99.
The sales rarely have a rhyme or reason.
And that’s why I have over 300 books in my “current reads” folder of my kindle

Don’t forget to check out library ebook collections for others in series.

LOL that Cadfael series was one my exceptions in that I managed to get all the books since they regularly go on sale!

Not sure it would get much traffic in its own thread, but it appears that Ben Bova died from COVID-related complications this morning:

https://twitter.com/KathrynBruscoBk/...

That's a shame. Not my favorite writer but he had some good books going when I was growing up. Very techno-oriented, in the libertarian mold if I remember correctly.

Yeah, I have a lot of mixed feelings about his legacy because in a lot of ways he's patient zero for the kind of Elon Musk-can-do-no-wrong ethos that has sprung up in the last decade or so. I really think the hard sci-fi of the 90's hasn't faced enough of a reckoning for the techno-libertarian viewpoints it inspired in Silicon Valley and further abroad.

On the other hand, he was kind of a formative writer for me, and seemed like a real thoughtful guy. Also probably one of these dudes whose influence on sci-fi is a lot greater than his published work would suggest, as he did a lot of editing and ran the SFWA for a while.

He did have a way with YA stories.

Ben Bova is a name I instantly recognize, but in looking at his bibliography, I think I've read almost nothing he wrote. I don't remember even seeing one of his books on the shelf. I wonder if that's my failing, or if the bookstores I frequented just didn't carry him?

Yet, for all that, I regret his passing. Stupid COVID.

I read Privateer and didn't enjoy it.

I think the least satisfying Hercule Poirot endings are those where the murderer ends up being a suspect using a false identity. Poirot is about solving cases with psychology not clues, but that goes out the window when a person isn’t who you thought.

Quintin_Stone wrote:

I think the least satisfying Hercule Poirot endings are those where the murderer ends up being a suspect using a false identity. Poirot is about solving cases with psychology not clues, but that goes out the window when a person isn’t who you thought.

I'm sure I've stated this here before, but my least favorite Christies are where she's meta-gaming reader expectations.

She wrote a *lot* of stories. I'm sure she scrabbled, sometimes desperately, for any new and interesting approach.

I’m sort of disappointed with what Stross is doing with the Laundry series. I liked the story told in the most recent book but it’s not really a Laundry book so much as a book set in the Laundry universe. The prior book ended on a huge shakeup of the status quo and I was expecting to see the characters I’ve been following for 16 years deal with the repercussions of that event, but none of the main characters make an appearance in this book nor does the Laundry organization itself or even the typical recurring themes of magic-through-technology. It’s basically a one-off heist book featuring new characters that are all either psychics or traditional magicians.
He did set up some interesting lore stuff that will definitely have big future repercussions... which we also won’t get to see play out anytime soon because the next book is apparently a flashback story that takes place between books 7 and 8.
C’mon man, it’s been a rough year. Stop playing with my expectations.

Bought my nephew the Hitchhiker's Guide Omnibus for his recent 12th birthday, because I'm a rad uncle. Started reading it again myself for the unknownth time so it'll be fresh when we discuss it.

Yeah, Stross gets kind of bored with his settings and starts breaking stuff after a few books. The Laundry series went on a fair bit longer with something of a status quo than usual at least.

Stross has said there's more books coming with the Laundry characters we know, but I get the impression he wanted a break from them to explore some other parts of the world.

r013nt0 wrote:

Bought my nephew the Hitchhiker's Guide Omnibus for his recent 12th birthday, because I'm a rad uncle. Started reading it again myself for the unknownth time so it'll be fresh when we discuss it.

I just never could get into the Hitchhiker books (though maybe I'll try again someday) but I did just use the 6 audible credits I've been saving up for whenever to get all 6 episodes of the radio play.

The radio play is so good.

The guy that wrote Narnia wrote a space series called The Space Trilogy or The Cosmic Trilogy or The Ransom Trilogy. I don't know why it has so many names. Kind of curious what kind of sci fi book he would write. Might not be sci fi at all.

ruhk wrote:

I’m sort of disappointed with what Stross is doing with the Laundry series. I liked the story told in the most recent book but it’s not really a Laundry book so much as a book set in the Laundry universe. The prior book ended on a huge shakeup of the status quo and I was expecting to see the characters I’ve been following for 16 years deal with the repercussions of that event, but none of the main characters make an appearance in this book nor does the Laundry organization itself or even the typical recurring themes of magic-through-technology. It’s basically a one-off heist book featuring new characters that are all either psychics or traditional magicians.

Not his fault. He's talked about this on his blog. He wanted Dead Lies Dreaming to be presented as the beginning of a new series (that just happened to be set in the same world as the Laundry Files), but his publisher refused to do that and insisted on labelling it Laundry Files 10 against Stross's wishes.

Baron Of Hell wrote:

The guy that wrote Narnia wrote a space series called The Space Trilogy or The Cosmic Trilogy or The Ransom Trilogy. I don't know why it has so many names. Kind of curious what kind of sci fi book he would write. Might not be sci fi at all.

They're far more didactic than the Narnia books. All about Heroic Christians vs Evil Atheist Scientists.

CaptainCrowbar wrote:
Baron Of Hell wrote:

The guy that wrote Narnia wrote a space series called The Space Trilogy or The Cosmic Trilogy or The Ransom Trilogy. I don't know why it has so many names. Kind of curious what kind of sci fi book he would write. Might not be sci fi at all.

They're far more didactic than the Narnia books. All about Heroic Christians vs Evil Atheist Scientists.

Yeah, they're... Problematic. Narnia is fine, but his other stuff gets quite religious and evangelical.

After reading almost 60 books this year I finally hit a book I'm dreading trying to finish. Space Opera by Cat Valente. Every paragraph has a thousand metaphors. Imagine the witty writing of Hitchhiker's Guide but ramped to a million. I have not read any of their other books but I'm not sure I can finish this one. Curious if other have read it.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:
CaptainCrowbar wrote:
Baron Of Hell wrote:

The guy that wrote Narnia wrote a space series called The Space Trilogy or The Cosmic Trilogy or The Ransom Trilogy. I don't know why it has so many names. Kind of curious what kind of sci fi book he would write. Might not be sci fi at all.

They're far more didactic than the Narnia books. All about Heroic Christians vs Evil Atheist Scientists.

Yeah, they're... Problematic. Narnia is fine, but his other stuff gets quite religious and evangelical.

Narnia is fine if you ignore the misogyny and anti-Arab stance. Obviously, Tolkien had that, too, and I collect both authors.

karmajay wrote:

After reading almost 60 books this year I finally hit a book I'm dreading trying to finish. Space Opera by Cat Valente. Every paragraph has a thousand metaphors. Imagine the witty writing of Hitchhiker's Guide but ramped to a million. I have not read any of their other books but I'm not sure I can finish this one. Curious if other have read it.

Yeah, her prose is really dense. I liked the short stories of hers that I’ve read, but find her novels exhausting.

Space Opera is probably her most accessible book, and I love it to pieces

tuffalobuffalo wrote:
CaptainCrowbar wrote:
Baron Of Hell wrote:

The guy that wrote Narnia wrote a space series called The Space Trilogy or The Cosmic Trilogy or The Ransom Trilogy. I don't know why it has so many names. Kind of curious what kind of sci fi book he would write. Might not be sci fi at all.

They're far more didactic than the Narnia books. All about Heroic Christians vs Evil Atheist Scientists.

Yeah, they're... Problematic. Narnia is fine, but his other stuff gets quite religious and evangelical.

More so than Narnia? I thought he hit the religious pretty hard in last few books.

Yeah the last Narnia book in particular is.. yikes.