Google Android catch-all

I am super happy with the bezel situation on my S8+. The screen is big and beautiful. I don't feel like the tiny top and bottom bezels are detracting from anything. And it sure as sh*t looks better than having a notch.

Middcore wrote:
*Legion* wrote:

I have an S9+ and the bezels are so small, I can't wrap my head around the stupid stuff being done in phone design trying to get rid of them completely.

To say nothing of the stupid stuff being done to make the phone 2.3mm thinner.

Word. I'd take a phone with a replaceable battery and a standard headphone jack right about now.

*Legion* wrote:

I have an S9+ and the bezels are so small, I can't wrap my head around the stupid stuff being done in phone design trying to get rid of them completely.

Totally. I think phone manufacturers are gunning for the design of the Gryzzl phone, but they're nowhere near there.

IMAGE(https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/CCqpj3u3pkvEsBJKE2Rq5gqZM7Q=/178x0:1899x1147/1280x854/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/45769582/Screen_Shot_2015-02-25_at_9.06.19_AM.0.0.png)

I hope this phone comes to the US

In addition to that Snapdragon 845, the brand's base level F1 comes loaded with 6GB of RAM, 64GB of storage, while the pricier model ups the ante with 8GB of RAM and up to 256GB of storage. No matter which version of the phone Poco fans shell out for, they'll get a 6.18-inch, 18.7:9 LCD screen running at Full HD+, a super-fast rear fingerprint sensor, a 20-megapixel front-facing camera and -- perhaps most important -- a 4,000mAh battery.

for $300.

Budget phones always cut corners somewhere. Not that that is unexpected, but it's always a case of good for the price.

DSGamer wrote:
Middcore wrote:
*Legion* wrote:

I have an S9+ and the bezels are so small, I can't wrap my head around the stupid stuff being done in phone design trying to get rid of them completely.

To say nothing of the stupid stuff being done to make the phone 2.3mm thinner.

Word. I'd take a phone with a replaceable battery and a standard headphone jack right about now.

I hate that I had to give up on the battery one, but the S9+ absolutely won my purchase due to microSD and headphone jack. Anything without these might as well not exist to me.

*Legion* wrote:
DSGamer wrote:
Middcore wrote:
*Legion* wrote:

I have an S9+ and the bezels are so small, I can't wrap my head around the stupid stuff being done in phone design trying to get rid of them completely.

To say nothing of the stupid stuff being done to make the phone 2.3mm thinner.

Word. I'd take a phone with a replaceable battery and a standard headphone jack right about now.

I hate that I had to give up on the battery one, but the S9+ absolutely won my purchase due to microSD and headphone jack. Anything without these might as well not exist to me.

Similar reasons why I like the S8+, but I find the ability to pay for stuff on a regular card reader the most compelling reason to stay with Samsung.

EvilDead wrote:

On my watch I just started using "Garmin Pay" which is guess is the same thing as Google pay because they both work at the same places. Sometimes I have to physically bump my watch into the device to make it register while other times a swipe works. Now that you know the chip is on the bottom have you tried it since?

Generally, the NFC transactions just work for whatever brand service. If one works, they all do. Rarely do you see stores excluding one once NFC is turned on with at the POS terminal.

(Project managed a point of sale system upgrade last year for a regional convenience store chain)

I just picked up an unlocked LG G6 (no notch! headphone jack! amazing battery life!) and joined Cricket Wireless because it's way cheaper than the big carriers and the network coverage is great.

My only problem is that I can't seem to find an easy way to upgrade this thing to Oreo. I'm stuck down on Android 7.0 with no clear way to update the OS. I contacted Cricket, who said they can't help me because my phone is unlocked and "unofficially supported", as in, I didn't buy a branded phone from them (they don't sell the G6 themselves). They said to contact LG, which I also did, and I got a very confusing response back that essentially said it's up to your carrier to send the update the phone.

So I'm stuck in the middle. Is there a way to update this thing to Android 8 without having to root it or crack it or whatever else people do?

If you got to LG's website and download the most current SDK and use LG's installation software you can side load the update. It's a pretty easy and straight forward process, but it may be a little daunting if you have never done anything like it before.

Thank you, I'll give that a shot. I'm great with PCs and what not, but I haven't fiddled with cell phones very much. This site looks like it's got the directions at least for updating to Nougat, but I'd think it would be the same for Oreo. Maybe a good weekend project.

I was happy to give up removable batteries for more waterproof phones.

Does anyone know of an elegant integrated solution for reminders? I might be doing something wrong but Googles implementation just seems so clunky and rarely seems to do it's one job, remind me.

My issues:
1. The easiest way I've found to create a reminder is "OK, Google" but that is annoying in public. Every other way that I've found is clunky and slow.

2. Remind me at place seems to only work 1/2 of the time.

3. When my phone is silenced, which is most of the time, the reminders aren't prominent and I tend to miss them. Clearing the notification panel makes them history for all intents and purposes.

4. There is no quick way to snooze or remind me later, like outlook, that I've found.

Are you using google Calendar or something different right now?

As for missing notifications, get a smart watch?

Right now I'm using the google assistant either by "OK, Google; set a reminder" or by typing from the native google search bar. I use google Calendar but only add reminders there through my PC.

On, the iPhone reminders were dead simple and hard to miss. There just doesn't seem to be an official reminder app with settings or widget on android.

I get notifications every time on my phone of reminders for calendar items. Not sure about "Ok Google, set a reminder", I haven't used that much.

The google assistant appears to add them to the Calendar so it's just a faster method. What happens when you clear you notification area or your phone is silenced? I have never had a popup like I do when my alarm goes off or a timer is done. On iPhone I would get something like this:

IMAGE(https://img.gadgethacks.com/img/80/61/63534631543682/0/set-trigger-location-based-reminders-your-iphone.w1456.jpg)

Also, location base reminders are a crapshoot. I had one remind me to pickup peanut butter at Wegmans two weeks and 4 visits later.

Tasks or google keep

Yeah I put them into Google calendar manually but miss the popup most of the time. I definitely need something else.

boogle wrote:

Tasks or google keep

That seems to work slightly better but the popup will still disappear with no user action. At least it shows an red notification bubble though. Still not great but better. It is weird that Google would have two different reminder systems that aren't connected.

Ideally I would like an app that can use the reminders in the calendar but make notifications that require an action. They are too easy to clear or miss when they are in the main, cluttered, notification list. If I need to set a time that I need to do something, and I need to rely on it, the count down timer works worlds better.

I'm bummed the Google Feed widget is going away. I've tried "At-a-Glance", it's replacement, and it kinda sucks. It only gives me date/weather. No news, no upcoming events, no search access. Unless I'm doing something wrong, it seems sort of useless.

I just received my Pixel 3 XL yesterday. My first impression is that I'm honestly a little bummed that it doesn't wow me. I'm upgrading from a Note 5. While I'm thrilled that I'm getting rid of Samsung's bloatware, I'm not excited about Google's launcher.

Let's start with hardware. I don't care about the all-glass construction because I always wrap my phones in an Otter Box case. I'm getting used to the fingerprint scanner on the back, though I'm not sure that makes it any easier than having it on the Home button. Speaking of which, there is no physical Home button, only a virtual one. I find that irritating as when you are in an app that takes over the screen, you have to swipe up to see the virtual Home button. In fact, the only physical buttons are power, the volume controls, and neat squeeze function to bring up the Assistant.

The Google launcher for Pie forces you to see the At-a-glance "widget" at the top of your home screen, taking up a lot of real estate. You'd need to switch to another launcher to get rid of it. Google is doing away with their Google Feed widget, which I liked, but you can now swipe to the left to access the news feed, so I'm good with that.

I'm now using the Google Calendar widget to see my day, but it is really ugly. I may try to find another option.

The Assistant is really where this phone shines. The integration and expansion of its capabilities are really something. You can use different canned responses to get configurable feeds of information. For instance, when I say "Good morning" I get a greeting, a weather report, and traffic information.

I haven't explored the camera or watched any videos yet, but the speakers are definitely an improvement over what I had in the Note 5. They still are not as good as a true Bluetooth speaker, however.

I've used Locale for years to set up the phone based on various conditions. Android is starting to wrap in some of that so I need less scenarios within Locale. For instance, they include Android Auto which seems to do a good job of detecting when the car is moving. They also have "Do Not Disturb" and "Wind-down" settings that help you set your phone up for when you're sleeping.

The Pixel 3 included a USB-C earbud headphones, a 3.5mm jack to USB-C dongle, and a USB-A to USB-C dongle (plus the USB-C cable and wall plug). They include functionality for transferring apps and data from your old phone to your new one (using the provided USB dongle). It was easy.

Change is rough (I had my Note 3 exactly how I liked it) and I think it is a good phone, but it isn't perfect.

Thanks Nevin.
I'm in a similar boat coming from a S7 and trying to decide if jump into Pixel 3 or not. I really want one, but am hesitant just from having to deal with the changes and potential regrets.

Home buttons are pretty much gone on all phones just like the headphone jack.

I have a 2XL and I love having the fingerprint sensor on the back.
Pro-Tip. You can swipe down on the fingerprint sensor to bring down the notifications and settings. Search in settings for "swipe fingerprint for notifications"

The Camera and the assistant are really the best things about this phone.

I actually surprised that you don't like the Pixel launcher. I can't use Samsung phones because of how much garbage they dump open top of it. The Pixel is what pulled me away from the iPhone and every time I try to fix someone's Galaxy I get so annoyed.

Still trying to decide if I want to upgrade from Pixel OG to 2 or 3.

Gotta keep Google Fi, service has been so cheap.

Nevin73 wrote:

I'm getting used to the fingerprint scanner on the back, though I'm not sure that makes it any easier than having it on the Home button. Speaking of which, there is no physical Home button, only a virtual one. I find that irritating as when you are in an app that takes over the screen, you have to swipe up to see the virtual Home button. In fact, the only physical buttons are power, the volume controls, and neat squeeze function to bring up the Assistant.

These are the exact sort of irritating things you'll get over really quick and wonder why they ever bothered you. It's all about muscle memory. You'll begin doing things without thinking and it'll be fine.

I'm waiting on my Pixel 3 to come in. I ordered two days ago, and the day after ordering, they bumped my delivery date out from next week to Nov 8-9.

I'm upgrading from a Nexus 5x on Fi. The phone's actually been doing okay for most stuff, it's just recently gotten real slow when I try and do two things at once, like start a podcast and then try to get navigation going.

Nevin, most of the stuff you're finding weird is stuff that my phone's done forever, and I actually like. The fingerprint sensor on the back is way better (for me) than on the front. At this point, I just naturally pick up the phone with my forefinger on the back now, without thinking. I'm also super used to having to show the bottom bar with home and back buttons, and kind of appreciate that when I don't need them, they're not taking up either screen space or physical bevel space.

Aside from the cheap price keeping me on Fi, I can't see myself going to a phone that's not running stock Android. I hate the high price of the Pixel 3, but also didn't want any of the cheaper Fi phones with manufacturer shells over stock Android.

garion333 wrote:
Nevin73 wrote:

I'm getting used to the fingerprint scanner on the back, though I'm not sure that makes it any easier than having it on the Home button. Speaking of which, there is no physical Home button, only a virtual one. I find that irritating as when you are in an app that takes over the screen, you have to swipe up to see the virtual Home button. In fact, the only physical buttons are power, the volume controls, and neat squeeze function to bring up the Assistant.

These are the exact sort of irritating things you'll get over really quick and wonder why they ever bothered you. It's all about muscle memory. You'll begin doing things without thinking and it'll be fine.

Truth. As an iPhone X user I can attest to the fact that you get used to gestures for everything eventually. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

You never get used to carrying around dongles and needing to use wireless headphones, though.

I'm actually semi-glad for the dongle? I have a set of bluetooth earbuds for walking around already. For longer listening, I have a big pair of Sony monitor headphones. The problem is that the jack is physically wider than standard, so it's to big for the headphone jack opening in most cases. Having the dongle means any case will work with my wonky headphones!

But yeah, in general, dongles suck. I'm just glad that Google is including usb-c headphones, and all the dongles and adapters you could want. I actually use the USB-A>C adapter that came with my wife's Pixel 2 when I need to connect an iphone to my macbook that only has USB-C ports but all lightning cables are USB-A.

Stele wrote:

Still trying to decide if I want to upgrade from Pixel OG to 2 or 3.

Gotta keep Google Fi, service has been so cheap.

Agreed on Project Fi.

And love my 2. But if you can upgrade with a zero interest loan get the 3.