"DLC" or "This topic would be better if it came on a disc."

Rexneron wrote:
MechaSlinky wrote:
Lard wrote:

Some security researchers have indicated that the Kindle may even be tracking its users' GPS locations.

Man, if I had a Kindle, I'd want Amazon to be tracking my location via GPS. It's not like they could use that to hurt me in any way. I can't imagine them profiting off of this knowledge, either, because who the hell am I that anyone should care where I was reading at any given time? But, if I get kidnapped, maybe the police can use this GPS information to find me!

Ironically, this can't happen in California without a lot of paperwork and ribbon cutting under current laws due to consumer privacy rules. I know this because a friend of mine's father recently went missing and they could not get Verizon to track him using his GPS enabled phone. His dead body was found 5 days later in an coroner's office, they were unable to identify him correctly when they first took him in. It took Verizon 3 days after LAPD asked them to cooperate to even being to being using any tracking technologies, but by then it was too late and I believe the phone battery was drained or turned off. If the missing person wasn't a well known violinist for the Los Angeles Philharmonic I'm sure Verizon wouldn't have gone through the trouble of initiating a search, as they legally could not do anything due to consumer privacy laws that would not allow tracking unless initiated by the individual, and they had to go through legal loop jumping to get it done.

Eh, sorry for the rant but I knew the people involved so that commented touched a nerve.

I can see how it would, but I can't blame Verizon, or the laws that tied their hands. It definately sucks in this situation, but it'd be a different story if it involved someone trying to hide from an unbalanced and dangerous relative.

Stengah wrote:
Rexneron wrote:
MechaSlinky wrote:
Lard wrote:

Some security researchers have indicated that the Kindle may even be tracking its users' GPS locations.

Man, if I had a Kindle, I'd want Amazon to be tracking my location via GPS. It's not like they could use that to hurt me in any way. I can't imagine them profiting off of this knowledge, either, because who the hell am I that anyone should care where I was reading at any given time? But, if I get kidnapped, maybe the police can use this GPS information to find me!

Ironically, this can't happen in California without a lot of paperwork and ribbon cutting under current laws due to consumer privacy rules. I know this because a friend of mine's father recently went missing and they could not get Verizon to track him using his GPS enabled phone. His dead body was found 5 days later in an coroner's office, they were unable to identify him correctly when they first took him in. It took Verizon 3 days after LAPD asked them to cooperate to even being to being using any tracking technologies, but by then it was too late and I believe the phone battery was drained or turned off. If the missing person wasn't a well known violinist for the Los Angeles Philharmonic I'm sure Verizon wouldn't have gone through the trouble of initiating a search, as they legally could not do anything due to consumer privacy laws that would not allow tracking unless initiated by the individual, and they had to go through legal loop jumping to get it done.

Eh, sorry for the rant but I knew the people involved so that commented touched a nerve.

I can see how it would, but I can't blame Verizon, or the laws that tied their hands. It definately sucks in this situation, but it'd be a different story if it involved someone trying to hide from an unbalanced and dangerous relative.

Oh yeah, I'm not trying to rail against Verizon, it's just that it's not so clear cut. In many cases you either have it one way or another, very hard for these entities to walk in the gray areas.

Jayhawker wrote:
TheCounselor wrote:

Just an idea I had, but would you pay extra for a game at launch to guarantee you got any and all DLC released for it for free?

Say you buy Gears 3, and the standard edition costs $60. But, for $80, you get a code that allows you access to every map pack that Epic releases for the game. It's kinda like buying the Game of the Year edition at launch.

It's a neat idea, but I think it is begging for feeling ripped off. If developers think gamers on the the forums have a displaced sense of entitlement now, wait till you pre-charge them for a DLC for a game they haven't played yet.

I'm not one to feel entitled, but I wouldn't pay extra. I like to know what I buy before I pay, this kind of transaction would take a huge amount of trust in the competence and goodwill of the developer.

Rexneron wrote:

Sad things.

Wow. That's terrible. I'm sorry about the crappy situation. This is getting off-topic, but I definitely disagree with any law that doesn't allow the police to find someone in danger. Maybe Verizon and others should hand out forms so that people can give the companies permission to give the police their information and GPS location should they wind up being a Missing Person and maybe that law should have a few exceptions to it.

TheCounselor wrote:

Just an idea I had, but would you pay extra for a game at launch to guarantee you got any and all DLC released for it for free?

Two words: Hellgate. London.
Never again.

I'm really interested to see how League of Legends works out financially. I think they're starting to get some pushback from players who refuse to purchase new champions at their current price. If they can find the right balance this might be a sign of things to come from Blizzard, EA LA and others.

BadKen wrote:
TheCounselor wrote:

Just an idea I had, but would you pay extra for a game at launch to guarantee you got any and all DLC released for it for free?

Two words: Hellgate. London.
Never again.

Except, there's quite a difference between a game from an unproven studio and Gears of War 3, developed by Epic and published by Microsoft. People still buy lifetime subscriptions to some MMOs at launch. I remember quite a few people did that for Champions Online.

I've been posting this all over, but it pertains to so many different conversations. Maybe I should have just made a new thread.

http://redkingsdream.com/2010/01/the...

Lex Cayman wrote:

I've been posting this all over, but it pertains to so many different conversations. Maybe I should have just made a new thread.

http://redkingsdream.com/2010/01/the...

Interesting article, although he seems to totally miss the "games as service" angle that's getting a lot of play these days. Digital distribution will ultimately succeed or fail based on the perceived value that publishers provide to their customers.