How to pick an e-reader?

Calibre is great. I like it for it's support of fb2 format -- THE format of the Russian-language e-book scene, which is huge.

unntrlaffinity wrote:
Denny wrote:

I may have missed this bit of info on these pages, but I read, that they e-readers support formats like .doc, etc. I'm wondering, if you can only buy/download books from certain places, or can you just upload a document from your computer to it? A friend of mine wrote a long story once, and I can't bring myself to sit at the screen, and read it, and I'm hoping an e-reader would help there.

Most offer both options (licensed content and transferable content), although formats may be limited. Some readers read Mobipocket, some ePub, and some damn near everything.

Amazon has a surcharge for using their wireless service to purchase a book when traveling (or residing) outside the U.S. Perhaps that's how they're addressing international licensing issues.

However, I don't see anything that would stop you from signing up for an American Amazon account and downloading the books manually and transferring them via USB.

That must be a good friend, to consider dropping $200+ to read his story.

If your document is mainly typed text, converting any file to a format your eReader can handle is relatively easy.

While it's a great read I used it as an example, cause i didn't wanna say

Spoiler:

"e-books I've torrented"

And, yeah, the main question was about transferrable content, as in that the e-reader isn't chained to material downloaded from designated sources, and allows me to USB things like, for example, an essay, or anything similar without homebrew methods.

unntrlaffinity wrote:
Gorilla.800.lbs wrote:
unntrlaffinity wrote:

There's definitely a resemblance, and I know you can patent damn near everything now (including finger gestures, which is idiotic), but other than the concept itself (using an LCD screen), the Nook seems to have improved on a lot of the functions. So they might have stolen the concept, but I'm not sure you can patent the general idea like that, especially if you can't prove they're using your code or schematics.

The issue is that evidently Spring was in discussions with B&N, signed NDAs, and have shown them early prototypes. According to Spring, B&N took a gander at prototypes, then stood them up, stole the idea, and went to bed with Que.

Right. Which is a dick move, but not necessarily illegal unless the concept itself can be protected (my knowledge of what NDAs cover is limited to non-existent) or they can prove B&N wasn't developing something similar already. I mean, it's conceivable that the two units could have been in production at the same time, considering their announcement and release schedules.

I don't think they were, personally, but it is possible.

Why doesn't Nintendo sue them both. They had a two screen setup with a touch screen on the bottom befire either of them. It wasn't an ereader but the concept is pretty similar. I'm sure someone else did it before Nintendo. The ease of getting patents for the simplest concepts and ideas is ridiculous these days.

As a former B&N employee, I definitely think the Nook is the way to go.
Its particularly great that the company is prepared to adapt to the changing marketplace. Let's hope the money spent on development and infrastructure does everything they hoped it would do for the company.

If I wasn't such a compulsive bibliophile, I might even buy one of the damn things.

Despite owning a Kindle I am still leaning towards the Nook. It looks like it offers everything the Kindle does, plus WiFi, more file support, native PDF (out of the box), and the additional storage card. My one issue is the crippling of the loan program as it stands right now. I am going to purchase one for my Mother and my wife will get me one for Christmas.

New Intel ~e-reader. It converts paper books to digital e-books and reads them aloud.

IMAGE(http://www.intel.com/pressroom/kits/healthcare/reader/images/marquee.jpg)

Interesting, but considering the hubbub over the Kindle's text-to-speech, you'd think this would be an even bigger issue, since it can work with essentially any book.

Haakon7 wrote:

As a former B&N employee, I definitely think the Nook is the way to go.
Its particularly great that the company is prepared to adapt to the changing marketplace. Let's hope the money spent on development and infrastructure does everything they hoped it would do for the company.

If I wasn't such a compulsive bibliophile, I might even buy one of the damn things.

As a Kindle owner, I like the slightly more open support for formats it has, but B&N really needs to work on their device control experience. The web site doesn't make it easy to send books to a device, and unlocking books on a registered device (or at least an iPhone) requires putting in the credit card number with which you bought it.

Are you talking about buying a book on a computer and then unlocking on the phone? Because I found the BN App to work really well for buying books. But have not bought from a computer and tried to sync later. Or did you mean the Kindle App is wonky?

I would hope that the Nook like the Kindle would just sync over the cell modem.

But if I have to endure such DRM asshatery just because I got a book from my laptop, no thanks.

FWIW, the PC software for kindle released, and it's blissfully uncomplicated and clean:

http://is.gd/4Xpwy

I find myself reading on my iPhone more and more, honestly. Still love the kindle, but the phone is always with me. Having all my books on computers is a nice airplane alternative as well.

So I've been going back and forth on the Sony Daily Reader ($400!) and the Nook ($259) and found out a few things during my research that are telling me that the Nook is the way to go.

1. Yes, Sony's solution supports checking out books from the library, BUT you can't do it using the wireless access. The wireless access will ONLY allow you to browse Sony's e-book store. (No web browser on either device!!!)

2. The Nook *does* support checking out ebooks from your local library, but you have to do an extra step on your PC to transfer it over to the Nook. It's not that much more of a burden than Sony's solution appears to be.

I find myself reading on my iPhone more and more, honestly. Still love the kindle, but the phone is always with me. Having all my books on computers is a nice airplane alternative as well.

I've been drooling over e-readers for awhile, but I keep coming back to reading on my G1. Like you said, it's always there and it fits in my pocket.

The ereader software is now available on Android by the way, seamlessly integrates into your Fictionwise online bookshelf. A nice app to have if you dont have your Kindle with you. The other nice thing is that I am hoping that the two bits of software will allow for the cross talk between your Android phone and your Nook. Fictionwise and ereader are both owned by B&N now. I have a Kindle and I am transitioning to the Nook at Christmas. I love the Kindle but some of the potential of the Nook is luring me that way. I may get burned by early adoption, but I am enough of a gadget geek (ooh shiny color screen at bottom) that I can live with it. 250 ducats = 5 video games and if I spend a year with the device I have received my money's worth in my warped fiscal logic.

I ordered a Kindle 2 last night now that they are available in Canada. I have some concerns (i.e. USD pricing, lack of web browser support) but I'm still excited. Of course I hadn't realized the Nook was also made available for Canadians and could have picked one up the next time I went for some cross border shopping.

For those of you with Kindles how often do you use the web browser? I'm thinking I wouldn't have been likely to use it all that often as I have computers, iPhone etc that are amost always available for any browsing/online reading that I may want to do.

I also hope Amazon & Apple update the app store to allow the Kindle iPhone app in Canada soon.

UPDATE: I created a US iTunes account (without payment info) and was able to get the Kindle app. My Kindle should show up in the next day or so but in the meanwhile I started playing on the iPhone.

Admittedly I'm a bit disappointed initially in the book selection, in part due to the regional restrictions (i.e. some books in the US Store are not available in Canada). On the fiction front several of the books I was looking to read don't appear to be purchasable -- I hope I don't regret this being an early adopter (at least in Canada). I did find some good personal development non-fiction books though.

Minase wrote:

checking out ebooks from your local library

What kind of ebook selection does your library have? My county library system uses Netlibrary/OCLC, but that seems to have mostly nonfiction. The only fiction I could find are Gutenberg e-texts that I have access to elsewhere. The nonfiction is potentially useful, but I'd be more interested in access to fiction.

What kind of ebook selection does your library have?

Both the Seattle and King County libraries support the Overdrive library, (http://ebooks.kcls.org as an example), and all you need is a library card number. Other libraries like the Chicago and NYC public libraries support this system too.

Minase wrote:

Both the Seattle and King County libraries support the Overdrive library

My library uses Overdrive for audio books. I'll let them know I'm interested in the Overdrive ebooks as well.

I don't use the Kindle Dx web browser much. Maybe once a month to look up trivia; last time was when no one could remember who did a song we heard in the restaurant ("Always Something There To Remind Me", Naked Eyes). But I go *everywhere* with it. I even scout new books in the bookstore, then walk outside, grab a table at the mall or sit in my car and purchase the ones I liked. I'm going to Hell, aren't I?

Well, maybe or maybe not, but the bookstore isn't likely to survive if people only use them for free browsing.

rabbit wrote:

FWIW, the PC software for kindle released, and it's blissfully uncomplicated and clean:

A little bit TOO uncomplicated actually; there's no way to change communication settings for the app, which makes it useless on my corporate network because there's no way for me to tell it to use the corporate proxy server.

S'alright though, I can still use my Kindle and iPhone for reading. I've actually been doing a bit more reading on my iPhone lately, and it's actually kind of nice, not nearly as hard on the eyes as I would have expected.

New Kindle patch.

Battery life with wireless on is now 7 days - up from the previous 4 according to Amazon.

Also PDF support is native on 6" model. No conversion. Email your pdfs or transfer via USB to your Kindle.

And carry a magnifying glass for those pdfs!

I want a ereader so bad but I still have the same issue, ebooks are almost the same cost as regular books. I bought a 700 page book Tuesday night and I'll finish it tonight. I read books too quickly to spend 250 - 400 bucks and not get a break on the actual books. The cost of ebooks should be much less then paperbacks.

karmajay wrote:

I want a ereader so bad but I still have the same issue, ebooks are almost the same cost as regular books. I bought a 700 page book Tuesday night and I'll finish it tonight. I read books too quickly to spend 250 - 400 bucks and not get a break on the actual books. The cost of ebooks should be much less then paperbacks. :(

The cost of ebooks are MUCH cheaper than new release hardcovers. At least with Amazon, near every new release is $9.99 compared to $25-35. Of course, with the price wars going on right now between Amazon and Walmart, the prices on new release hardcovers have been ridiculously LOW on some titles (I paid $9 for Stephen King's latest novel, for example).

Yes, when you compare to paperbacks, the differences in price are much smaller (with actual paperbacks sometimes being cheaper than the ebook).

What it comes down to is this-- how many "new release" books do you think you read in a year? Are you the kind of person that just HAS TO HAVE a book the minute you think of it? Do you travel or commute?

Personally, I read books in bed and absolutely need a backlight of some sort on my reading device (I use my Blackberry w/ Mobipocket Reader right now). I test drove a friend's Kindle 2 back in April, and enjoyed it quite a bit. Just not enough for me to justify buying one of my own.

We've already paid off at least one of our Kindles in savings. Probably the two small ones. It really does save money, especially when you buy newer books. But paperbacks are *usually* a bit cheaper. Still, a book that's come out in paper is likely to be $6 on the Kindle, and you don't have to run to the store to get it...

You really need to be the kind of person who wants the books more than worries about what they cost. In the long run, it's a good deal.

The Kindle 2 is what, $300 + about $50 for the extended warranty + about $30 for a decent cover. Call it $400. If you just bought $15 new releases of $25 hardbacks, that's 40 books. If you're buying trades at $10 vs. $15, it's 80 books. But if you are buying older books at $6 or so, it could be more. Even so, I'd estimate payback in about a year if you are a heavy reader.

Don't forget the Kindle 2 is now priced at $259. I also saw Amazon selling refurbs for $189 last week.

Except you can resell hardcovers or trade them or give then away, etc.

trip1eX wrote:

Except you can resell hardcovers or trade them or give then away, etc.

Obviously. If this is something that bothers people, why would they even consider buying an ebook reader?

So my most wonderful and lovely girlfriend got me a Kindle for Christmas, and whaddaya know, it arrives early. I'm over the moon, it's such a nice device! I'm busy downloading things from Project Gutenberg, which is fun. I also bought my first book on it, which was far more of a thrill than it should be.

I have to say, I'm really impressed with the e-ink technology. The screen is crisp and clear, and very easy on the eyes. The interface is easy to use too, and while the keyboard is a bit small, it's still usable without increasing the size of the reader too much. All in all, I'm one happy bunny!

trip1eX wrote:

Except you can resell hardcovers or trade them or give then away, etc.

I have never found this particularly convincing for most things-books, games, CDs. The idea that I may choose to sell something for pennies on the dollar spent seems an odd reason to buy something. Personally, I prefer the money saved up front. More to the point, books, music, and games are over-priced because of compensation for the secondary market. You think that history textbook really has 200 bucks worth of content in it?

The lending thing is a big sticking point. What I would suggest that you support stores that support either an open format or at least a more open DRM scheme. There are scores of places that sell bucks in unprotected PDF, rtf, and so forth.