Coffee Catch-All

boogle wrote:
This is in my amazon wishlist.

They sell the Kyocera grinder at Williams and Sonoma for $50 or so. I picked one up for when I travel with my Mypressi
http://mypressi.com/

It works very well if you stick with the same coffee brand. As soon as you switch to a different coffee you need to fiddle with the grind setting.

This bad boy works quite well for the home grinder
http://www.brevilleusa.com/coffee/the-smart-grinder.html

This Aeropress thing looks interesting. I don't even drink coffee, my wife does, out of your standard drip maker into a pot. Times I've tasted coffee it's always been bitter, but I've rarely tried from anything but those drip makers. Wonder if I might enjoy something made slightly better... hm.

Either way, maybe the Aeropress will make a nice gift for her.

Interesting topic this is.

I prefer cheap instant coffee to standard filter coffee. Filter is an abomination.

We have a "water boy" in our apartment, the one in the left picture, with hot/cold water dispensers. We use the hot water for instant oatmeal, hot chocolate, and so on... I don't see why it wouldn't work with coffee, or I was thinking the aeropress... gotta ask the wife.

MOAR COFFEE.

wordsmythe wrote:
MOAR COFFEE.

Your eloquent argument has won me over, I'll make another cup.

Mmm, coffee...

wordsmythe wrote:
MOAR COFFEE.

IMAGE(http://www.toothpastefordinner.com/033109/like-coffee.gif)

So, I became fed up with that weak hot liquid that passed for coffee at work. I have purchased a french press. For people who want a head count, I think there are about 10 kitchen tools in my house and garage capable of making coffee. I am including the percolators in with the camping gear and the "spare Mr. Coffee."

I think the issue at work is the ancient, and rarely scrubbed carafes. Because I, at home, can make Maxwell House taste a thousand times better than what we get at work.

I will advise of the results. I am fortunate to have an insta hot at work, which will make things smoother(if its own thermometer is to be trusted, it is usually spitting out 190 degree water). I will grind at home, in the morning, and brew at work. I have extended an invitation to a select few confederates who may partake of my spoils.

Now for the hard part. How much salt do I use with a French Press?

Salt?

About a grain of kosher per cup.

boogle wrote:
About a grain of kosher per cup.

So for 8 cups, my normal gentle pinch will suffice?

Yeah, Muttonchop. There are fancy science reasons for it, but salt helps bring dominant flavors of any food or drink to the fore front. I am not making salty coffee, just seasoning it.

KingGorilla wrote:
Yeah, Muttonchop. There are fancy science reasons for it, but salt helps bring dominant flavors of any food or drink to the fore front. I am not making salty coffee, just seasoning it.

It's crazy, but it works. I tried it after Alton Brown recommended it, and you can definitely taste the difference - more body and smoothness is how it seemed to me.

Is the salt added before the brewing, or after?

In a french press, put it in with the coffee when you stir it, as I recall.

Huh. I time my French press using Alton Brown's advice, but never heard the part about salt. And I can see how it makes sense.

I may have just learned something useful.

muttonchop wrote:
Salt?

If you have really bitter coffee adding a tiny amount of salt will equal that out and bring out the actual coffee flavor. ( if its a drip then add the salt to your cup.)

Havent drunk coffee for about 4 months. And then drank a can of Red Bull last Sunday before going to the rock climbing gym. The forgotten effect of so much caffeine got me literally bouncing off the walls.

So what's this I hear about unfiltered (ie French Press) coffee raising LDL levels? Can nothing good in life be left unsullied?

I tend only to add salt if there's a bitterness problem. Otherwise, it's just one more thing that I don't bother adding.

imbiginjapan wrote:
So what's this I hear about unfiltered (ie French Press) coffee raising LDL levels? Can nothing good in life be left unsullied?
Shut your filthy whore mouth.

imbiginjapan wrote:
So what's this I hear about unfiltered (ie French Press) coffee raising LDL levels? Can nothing good in life be left unsullied?

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6242467/...
There was a Swedish study a while back that made this case. It put me off French Press as my daily method.

An article on lifehacker today about coffee-making technique and methods. Quick version: they like aeropress too.
http://lifehacker.com/#!5778831/dropping-the-drip-how-to-get-started-with-better-coffee-making

Not all LDL is created equal. Small, dense particles are dangerous. Large, fluffy ones aren't. Therefore increase in LDL does not always mean elevated heart risk.

http://www.heartsmartmd.com/communit...

LDL has a big genetic component, so the risk is probably tied to your genes as well. Still, easy to minimize when the aero press is so delicious.

KingGorilla wrote:
Yeah, Muttonchop. There are fancy science reasons for it, but salt helps bring dominant flavors of any food or drink to the fore front. I am not making salty coffee, just seasoning it.

Interesting, I'll give it a try next time I brew up some coffee. For science!

Well, I got one. Freaking finally. Worth the wait. Coffee at work is 1000 times better. Using my Italian espresso in the press yields a bold, velvety brew. It is frothy on top, with a smooth consistency.

My frenchpress broke.

boogle wrote:
My frenchpress broke.

Aeropress time?

Knowing boogle, it was probably destroyed in a meth lab explosion.

Boogle. Pics? What broke? Mine seems dirt simple. There is a beaker, a filter, a stand/handle, and a rod. Was it the glass?