Do you like what you do? If not, how do you cope?

EverythingsTentative wrote:
What I find extremely difficult is, ass kissing and that is the only thing that gets you anywhere, where I currently work. Which is one of the reasons I am still so mad. Hard work means nothing if you don't end every day with a brown nose.

The job I currently do isn't bad and it can be rewarding. The people that walk all over me, lie to me, betray me, are the problem. These people are also the people in charge.

Finding a new job is entirely understandable under those circumstances.

I think I am going to contact the managers at the places I had applied, and see what I can do. Even if that something is just establishing a relationship, which sounds like a no brainer.

Thanks, a little encouragement and words of advice really go a long way. I'm in debt to you all.

Good luck with it! Getting the foot in the door is painful but worth it - like Larry, I genuinely enjoy my job. Well, 95% of it. There's always HR and QC.

I just don't like working so I think I'd be dissatisfied with any job. I have this idealistic hippyish perception of how the world should be and working 8-10 hours a day in a cubicle is not it. But I get the whole this is how things are, work and money make the world go 'round, blah blah blah.

So I've resigned myself to accepting the status quo. Ironically, the one way to achieve my idealistic view of not working would be to make enough money as fast as possible but I don't have the motivation for that. I value my free time more than the time I spend working. I value the time spent with my family and pursuing my interests and hobbies more than the time it would take to make enough money to be able to do those things 24-7.

That said, what I do is challenging and that's enough. It's not what I went to school for (computer science) but I'm a manufacturing engineer in all but degree and it's highly technical which is right up my alley. The company I work for has great perks which keep me happy, specifically a 401K policy where the company matches 100% of the first 4% of your contributions. So if 4% of my salary is $3,600 the company matches $3,600. And I was fully vested from Day 1. So when I get disgruntled for whatever reason I look at my 401K statement, I look at how my kids have everything they need for a happy life, and I remember that I'm in the 90th percentile and I make sure I get to work early and leave a little later every day. I remember how fortunate I am when all that's being asked of me is 40 hours of my time for about 47 weeks per year.

And I'm totally sure that one day of my hippyish lifestyle would have me begging for a hot bath, my plasma tv, and my laptop hooked up to the internet. Funny how we long for things which we most likely wouldn't want if we had them.

FSeven wrote:
40 hours of my time

I can't imagine what I'd do with all my free time if I could go back to working those hours.

My job changed a while back (promoted) and I now spend three or sometimes four days a week sitting in a chair staring at status monitors, answering phones, and calling things out to co-workers. Almost never get to actually fix anything myself anymore. I spend every day wondering how many brain cells die while I stare blankly at the ceiling.

I drink now.

Drinking is the best!

Quintin_Stone wrote:
Drinking is the best!

And, given that it seems brewing and agriculture happened about the same time, probably it has always been there for coping with work! (Hunter-gatherers are slackers).

Coldstream wrote:
FSeven wrote:
40 hours of my time

I can't imagine what I'd do with all my free time if I could go back to working those hours. :D

I have a 3-month old and a 3-year old. I don't get free time for another 10 years or so.

FSeven wrote:

I have a 3-month old and a 3-year old. I don't get free time for another 10 years or so.

I dunno, our tank returned to the D&D campaign a year after giving birth. Get your priorities straight!

FSeven wrote:
I just don't like working so I think I'd be dissatisfied with any job. I have this idealistic hippyish perception of how the world should be and working 8-10 hours a day in a cubicle is not it. But I get the whole this is how things are, work and money make the world go 'round, blah blah blah.

So I've resigned myself to accepting the status quo. Ironically, the one way to achieve my idealistic view of not working would be to make enough money as fast as possible but I don't have the motivation for that. I value my free time more than the time I spend working. I value the time spent with my family and pursuing my interests and hobbies more than the time it would take to make enough money to be able to do those things 24-7.

That said, what I do is challenging and that's enough. It's not what I went to school for (computer science) but I'm a manufacturing engineer in all but degree and it's highly technical which is right up my alley. The company I work for has great perks which keep me happy, specifically a 401K policy where the company matches 100% of the first 4% of your contributions. So if 4% of my salary is $3,600 the company matches $3,600. And I was fully vested from Day 1. So when I get disgruntled for whatever reason I look at my 401K statement, I look at how my kids have everything they need for a happy life, and I remember that I'm in the 90th percentile and I make sure I get to work early and leave a little later every day. I remember how fortunate I am when all that's being asked of me is 40 hours of my time for about 47 weeks per year.

And I'm totally sure that one day of my hippyish lifestyle would have me begging for a hot bath, my plasma tv, and my laptop hooked up to the internet. Funny how we long for things which we most likely wouldn't want if we had them.

Have you ever considered being independently wealthy?

I've adopted this philosophy (to great success, currently): http://www.freemoneyfinance.com/2012...

Symbiotic wrote:
I've adopted this philosophy (to great success, currently): http://www.freemoneyfinance.com/2012...

I've been applying this lately, thanks for the reinforcement I'm thinking I should push harder in that direction (less BS I've been doing for the last five years, more process management and automating boring repetitive mind-numbing tasks).

Quintin_Stone wrote:
Drinking is the best!

+1