When you cry manly tears of manliness

The most recent one was while reading One Second After" title="One Second After">One Second After. The father - daughter relationship thing gets me every time.

Gaald wrote:

Near the end of Lord of the Rings when everyone bows down to the Hobbits... dammit I can't even think about it without getting chocked up.

Yup, gets me every time. "My friends, you bow to no one"

Aries wrote:
Gaald wrote:

Near the end of Lord of the Rings when everyone bows down to the Hobbits... dammit I can't even think about it without getting chocked up.

Yup, gets me every time. "My friends, you bow to no one"

My tear-filled moment of RotK was Théoden's speech to the Riders of Rohan right before they charged into battle. A sword clanging on spears, a challenge to ride to ruin, and ear-splitting chants of "Death!" just felt so, I dunno, authentic.

Rat Boy wrote:

"Jurassic Bark." Cue KaterinLHC weeping.

You're damn right. That episode would've made a great Cylon detector. I also cannot watch Avatar's "Tales of Ba Sing Se".

I weep nonstop for an hour each time I watch "Sleeping in Light," the finale of Babylon 5.

Yes! But it's so cathartic, like a "happy" cry. Not so happy is the episode where President Clark shuts down ISS. During the newscast, you can hear gunfire just off screen and see bits of set falling down, as the clearly shaken, terrified anchor tells the camera as calmly as she can that the president is corrupt, lying to the public, and then the screen goes dark... Maybe it's the journalist in me talking, but that gets me every time.

Up was a very melancholy movie all around. The first third, though--Jesus. That should come with a Surgeon General's warning. BEWARE: TOO MUCH SAD.

The most recent, and most intense bout of manly tears for me was during Jim Carrey's speech at the end of the Majestic. Especially when he brandishes the medal at the room.

I wouldn't have guessed Jim Carrey could do that either, but there you are. I thought Majestic was a very underrated film all in all.

I must confess that I am susceptible to emotional manipulation in films. Up had me choked up during the montage and again at the end when he is reviewing the scrapbook.

But I clearly remember the first movie I cried at. Well, I don't clearly remember the movie - Silent Running - but I do remember bawling afterward and being absolutely furious with my parents for letting me watch such a sad movie. I was screaming and yelling, asking how they could do that to me and I even made them that they never subject me to anything like that ever again. I think I was 7 or 8 at the time.

Minarchist wrote:

My tear-filled moment of RotK was Théoden's speech to the Riders of Rohan right before they charged into battle. A sword clanging on spears, a challenge to ride to ruin, and ear-splitting chants of "Death!" just felt so, I dunno, authentic.

I believe the fact that Bernard Hill, the actor who played Théoden, was the one to suggest the act of clanging his sword down the line of his warrior's spears helped sell that scene.

Another heart-breaking scene related to that was one that was only in the extended version of RotK: where Eomer spots what he believes to be Eowyn's corpse just seconds after spotting Théoden's.
Karl Urban says that what Peter Jackson told him for that scene was to believe that the very last of your kin that you have was dead before you. And Urban just went for it.

Looking at that scene and his turn in the new Star Trek I have to say that Karl Urban is a very good actor. Pathfinder being a fluke.

lostlobster wrote:

Hell, there's at least one place in each of the movies that gets me.

Let's see:
For FotR: Boromir's last stand
For TTT: Sam's speech after Frodo threatens him with Sting?

casktapper wrote:

I must confess that I am susceptible to emotional manipulation in films. Up had me choked up during the montage and again at the end when he is reviewing the scrapbook.

But I clearly remember the first movie I cried at. Well, I don't clearly remember the movie - Silent Running - but I do remember bawling afterward and being absolutely furious with my parents for letting me watch such a sad movie. I was screaming and yelling, asking how they could do that to me and I even made them that they never subject me to anything like that ever again. I think I was 7 or 8 at the time.

The first time I remember crying watching something on TV was "Snoopy Come Home" when Snoopy leaves Charlie Brown to go to live with his original owner. I very clearly remember turning away from the television and shoving my face in the pillows of the couch and bawling like the six year-old I was.

Falchion wrote:

For TTT: Sam's speech after Frodo threatens him with Sting?

I'd say maybe when Haldir dies at Helm's Deep, or possibly the stalwart determination of the elves in general mingled with the passive resignation to their fate during the battle.

lostlobster wrote:

Hell, there's at least one place in each of the movies that gets me.

falchion wrote:

Let's see:
For FotR: Boromir's last stand
For TTT: Sam's speech after Frodo threatens him with Sting?

FotR: Yes. Also right after Gandalf's death and there's something very sad about the breaking of the fellowship to me.
TTT: Exactly.

I'm not ashamed to say that Pans Labyrinth got me kind of misty at the end. And Futurama: Jurassic Bark gets me every time. I can't help it, I'm sensitive.
And I almost hate to bring it up, but the final scene in Firefly: The Message choked me up a bit.

The Lion King.
Every. f*cking. Time.
It's just a brilliant movie generally, but it's even giving me a little lump in my throat just thinking about it. Everyone wishes Mufasa was their dad. I haven't seen up yet as Disney hate the UK, but it will really have to be something special to even come close to the Lion King.

lostlobster wrote:

FotR: Yes. Also right after Gandalf's death and there's something very sad about the breaking of the fellowship to me.
TTT: Exactly.

I'm glad I got the TTT right. I think it's a good exercise in storytelling to spot the key emotional points in a story or film. As such, Haldir's death doesn't count as being a key point, but more as a plot point to increase the tension in the Battle for Helm's Deep that has been building before and during the fight.

For the scene after Gandalf's death, I refuse to believe the fact that it was done very early in filming and actually even before the rest of the cast had seen Ian Mckellen as Gandalf. It was simply done so well and authentic. Especially Frodo just wandering off in shock and that tearful/fearful reaction that Wood gave on being called.

I cry all the time. Some songs do it for me. Not necessarily the lyrics but a particularly beautiful melody. Films do it for me too. The most recent one was The Notebook. Cried like a baby. Repeatedly.

Never considered them "manly tears" or other such nonsense. If something moves me emotionally and it compels me to cry, I cry. I don't suppress emotions because of some ideological societal suggestion of how I'm supposed to behave simply because I have a pair of testicles. There's lots of things society tells me I'm supposed to like and do that I don't subscribe to. For instance, I don't like skinny blondes. I like my women with some meat on their bones. To me, Cosmo, Elle, etc. all read like a Christian Children's Fund brochure - I end up looking for the contact information so I can sponsor one of those malnourished waifs. I like to cook too. And help with household chores (hint: a woman who spends all her days working, cooking, cleaning does not have time to feel sexy - that's what many men don't understand. Want more nookie and playtime? Help out around the house.). I'm also a Palestinian sympathizer. And when my son comes any day now (due date is July 17th) I'm totally willing to look like a fool in public just to make him laugh.

Society has totally failed me.

The Big Lebowski: What makes a man, Mr. Lebowski?
The Dude: Dude.
The Big Lebowski: Huh?
The Dude: Uhh... I don't know sir.
The Big Lebowski: Is it being prepared to do the right thing, whatever the cost? Isn't that what makes a man?
The Dude: Hmmm... Sure, that and a pair of testicles.
Rob_Anybody wrote:

And I almost hate to bring it up, but the final scene in Firefly: The Message choked me up a bit.

The one early scene in the pilot episode for Firefly that hooked me onto the series was the one where Mal watches as Alliance drop ships arrive to end the Battle of Serenity Valley. Done in slow-mo and with out sound effects, as Mal watches, the man whom he has been encouraging "We're too pretty to die", gets shot in the chest from following Mal's distraction and standing up to watch the ships come down. Mal on the other hand, barely even registers the death.

I was thinking "boy that guy's going to be very interesting to watch what with all that on his mind." and I was right.

Man, I tear up all the time, mostly having to do with kids and mortality. Falchion's Independence Day example is a good one, gets me every single time. Got me on Sunday when I watched it.

Titanic, as crappy as that movie was, got me at the end when DiCaprio's character dies.

Scenes from books or film where dads talk to their kids can get me.

I was at a wedding a couple of weeks ago for my cousin. He's a lot younger than I am and seeing him dance with my daughter choked me up, thinking about the oncoming moving on of my kids. I still have a ways to go before it happens, but it unexpectedly took me aback. The combination of time gone by plus upcoming times to be really had a strong emotional impact on me.

Grenn wrote:

The Body in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. A show about ridiculous, fantastic death where no main character is safe, dealing realistically with the death of a loved one. And without any soundtrack for that episode.

This is exactly what I was thinking of. After loving Firefly and Dr. Horrible, my sister was able to convince me to watch Buffy (I'm still working on Season 6). When I got to this episode, I just completely broke down. I was weeping.

I can't think of any movie, song, TV show, book, etc that has had that much of an emotional impact on me. Brilliant. Absolutely brilliant.

It's going to make me sound like a stupid liberal hippie jackass, but when I heard Lynndie England talking about hearing the death screams at night from the other room in Abu Ghraib on last week's This American Life, I just about lost it. I started thinking about the fact that this isn't some other country doing these things, or something I read about in history books, but it's my people and it's happening now - for some reason it hit me really hard. I almost had to pull my car over.

plz no p&c k thx

As with so many things, I blame the wife.

Prior to getting married, I never cried due to movies/TV. In a choose-your-own-adventure theme, I have 3 possible explanations. Pick the one you like best….

(1): In my batchelorhood, I was indulging my manliness, and only watching manly movies, starring men, blowing sh*t up and kicking bad guys in the face until they are dead from it. Thus, there were never any tear-jerking moments, so no tears.

(2): Getting married has opened my eyes to the potential heartache of losing someone you love, so I can emote with sad bits in films more.

(3): I'm just getting old and bonkers.

Jonman wrote:

As with so many things, I blame the wife.

Prior to getting married, I never cried due to movies/TV. In a choose-your-own-adventure theme, I have 3 possible explanations. Pick the one you like best….

(1): In my batchelorhood, I was indulging my manliness, and only watching manly movies, starring men, blowing sh*t up and kicking bad guys in the face until they are dead from it. Thus, there were never any tear-jerking moments, so no tears.

(2): Getting married has opened my eyes to the potential heartache of losing someone you love, so I can emote with sad bits in films more.

(3): I'm just getting old and bonkers.

Funny. I used to cry all the time in movies. Now my wife just berates me and says "man up you pansie! It's just a movie!".

When Aeris dies, no really.

For sad tears it would have to be Forrest Gump standing under their tree, talking to Jenny that is no more. Wowsa... just thinking about it makes me moist.

For happy tears it's the end of Rudy.

I'd also agree with Reign Over Me. When he finally opens up and tells his story.

SpaceDog wrote:

It actually hapened to me for the first time the other day during Dear Zachery Dear Zachary: A Letter to a Son About His Father. This movie is VERY SAD.

This. Oh gosh this.

Minarchist wrote:
Aries wrote:
Gaald wrote:

Near the end of Lord of the Rings when everyone bows down to the Hobbits... dammit I can't even think about it without getting chocked up.

Yup, gets me every time. "My friends, you bow to no one"

My tear-filled moment of RotK was Théoden's speech to the Riders of Rohan right before they charged into battle. A sword clanging on spears, a challenge to ride to ruin, and ear-splitting chants of "Death!" just felt so, I dunno, authentic.

This scene is really powerful, it's hard not to feel emotional during it. Especially in a theatre.

pignoli wrote:

The Lion King.
Every. f*cking. Time.
It's just a brilliant movie generally, but it's even giving me a little lump in my throat just thinking about it. Everyone wishes Mufasa was their dad. I haven't seen up yet as Disney hate the UK, but it will really have to be something special to even come close to the Lion King.

I think I've seen that movie too many times for it to affect me in such a way.

magnus wrote:

The most recent one was while reading One Second After" title="One Second After">One Second After. The father - daughter relationship thing gets me every time.

This got me too.

The ending of Heat.

gets me every time.

Rob_Anybody wrote:

I'm not ashamed to say that Pans Labyrinth got me kind of misty at the end.

I know what you mean... The Captain's son, never knowing anything about his real father? Tragic.

I would have to say that TTT in LoTR only had one, the "No parent should have to bury their child," line. RoTK had the major one at the end. FoTR didn't get me with Gandalf because

Spoiler wrote:

[color=white]I already knew Gandalf wasn't really dead.[/color]

It was Boromir's last stand that really got me. And his obvious regret at his betrayal while he died.

"Up" took mere minutes to get to me, and every time he went back to that book got me again.

The DS9 episode, "The Visitor," MAN did that one ever get me going like a baby.

Every time I watch the Warner Brothers cartoon "Feed the Kitty" (the one with the bulldog Mark Anthony and the kitten he adopts) I burst into tears.

I cry over everything, but I've seen few things as emotionally devastating as Grave of the Fireflies. I saw it once about eight years ago and haven't had the strength to watch it again. I can't even imagine watching it now that I have a son.

For me, it's more moving than a film like Saving Private Ryan, Schindler's List, or Forrest Gump because it's so spare. There are no singular moments of catharsis that really give you an outlet for your emotions. You don't get a big speech or a scene where the characters finally break down and cry. You just get the slow, unrelenting despair of watching two children set adrift by war and the knowledge that there is nothing to save them.

God, I'm crying right now. I'm going to have to go watch the Kitty Cat Dance or something or I'm going to be a miserable wreck all day. What a way to spend my lunch break.

Falchion wrote:

The one early scene in the pilot episode for Firefly that hooked me onto the series was the one where Mal watches as Alliance drop ships arrive to end the Battle of Serenity Valley. Done in slow-mo and with out sound effects, as Mal watches, the man whom he has been encouraging "We're too pretty to die", gets shot in the chest from following Mal's distraction and standing up to watch the ships come down. Mal on the other hand, barely even registers the death.

I was thinking "boy that guy's going to be very interesting to watch what with all that on his mind." and I was right.

I had forgotten about this scene. I really felt for Mal when the resistance leaders, who he had fought so hard for and seen so many people suffer to support, just abandoned him and his comrades.

Edited to add:
Grave of the Fireflies is one giant yank at ye olde heartstrings.