Batman: Arkham Asylum Catch-All

Batman isn't about boasting. u_u

Quintin_Stone wrote:

Batman isn't about boasting. u_u

How would you know?

I put another hour or so in and then just abandoned it.

L's Backloggery[/url]]1/5 Stars.
Definitely overhyped - sluggish gameplay, little action, no widescreen FOV, obnoxious riddler puzzles. If this is a Zelda-like, it reminded me why I abandoned that genre of games long ago.

Not much to add, except that stringing a player along for 3+ hours without any kind of boss fight or other adrenaline-pumping moment is bad game design for any game imo. I couldn't help but feel that the game lacked focus. I am generally a fan of open world games, but coming right off AC2 makes B:AA feels like overdosing on Ritalin.

I think my main problem with B:AA is that it lacked direction in the story, and from that your motivation to follow the story. It's first half has a nice build up, but it just keeps building up to... what exactly? Don't get me wrong, I know the plot, but I'm left thinking, "that's your plan?".

Rather than being a game without a reason to exist or a concept, it's got half of one. All the bits are there, but the story glue is weak, and that story is supposed to be driving your progress.

The melee combat in B:AA is unusual in that it feels initially like it should be a button masher but it absolutely isn't. It's single button combat, but it's all timing based, and its only after that timing starts to sink that you really feel like the goddamn Batman.

Chumpy_McChump wrote:

The melee combat in B:AA is unusual in that it feels initially like it should be a button masher but it absolutely isn't. It's single button combat, but it's all timing based, and its only after that timing starts to sink that you really feel like the goddamn Batman.

Yup. That's it, exactly. It should be played on hard difficulty the first time through. That forces you to chain. It's all about getting those chains. Taking out 20 people with a single chain is what the game is all about.

Assassin's Creed 2 and Brotherhood still don't get the combat quite right like Batman, in my opinion. They're good, but they don't quite give you that "I'm an effin badass!" feeling.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

Assassin's Creed 2 and Brotherhood still don't get the combat quite right like Batman, in my opinion. They're good, but they don't quite give you that "I'm an effin badass!" feeling.

Excuse me while I whistle and five swoop in and murder you while I walk away like a boss.

iaintgotnopants wrote:
tuffalobuffalo wrote:

Assassin's Creed 2 and Brotherhood still don't get the combat quite right like Batman, in my opinion. They're good, but they don't quite give you that "I'm an effin badass!" feeling.

Excuse me while I whistle and five swoop in and murder you while I walk away like a boss.

Okay, you're right. I meant the part in AC where you are surrounded by 10 guys. You CAN do it really bad ass, but it's a bit harder. I always screw it up and get hit a couple times.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:
iaintgotnopants wrote:
tuffalobuffalo wrote:

Assassin's Creed 2 and Brotherhood still don't get the combat quite right like Batman, in my opinion. They're good, but they don't quite give you that "I'm an effin badass!" feeling.

Excuse me while I whistle and five swoop in and murder you while I walk away like a boss.

Okay, you're right. I meant the part in AC where you are surrounded by 10 guys. You CAN do it really bad ass, but it's a bit harder. I always screw it up and get hit a couple times.

Yeah, I never did well with the actual combat in either of the Assassin's Creed games I played. It probably had something to do with never using anything but the hidden blades.

What I played of Arkham Asylum seemed much better than Assassin's Creed and it was very much the opposite of button mashy. I really need to go back and play it but I rarely get time to play PS3. I'll probably just start over on the Steam version since I just got Arkham City on there as well.

Not that you weren't going to, iantgotnopants, but I would play AA before AC. The combat in AC got a little too complex for my taste whereas AA was right in my wheelhouse. There are just too many options and it gets overwhelming. Also, figuring out how to chain in AA will help with AC.

Also, doing the challenges can help to learn how to chain better. You can use them as tutorials.

I actually found the combat to be one of the few strong points of AA. To be fair though, I hate the slow motion take down of the last enemy. At least in Enslaved I felt a sense of accomplishment whenever finishing of the last mech. In AA it's just whichever enemy happened to stand last when I finished mashing the square button, so the slow-mo is actually an anti-climactic instead of bad-ass moment. With the standard thugs you encounter in the first 3 hours, it doesn't even matter if there is 2 or 8 of them. Maybe they get tougher later in the game, but again, I shouldn't have to play several hours to encounter the first exhilaration situation.

And since you brought up AC2, I think AC2 is superior to AA in every way. I enjoyed the combat there so much more as well, since it's way more tactical and has you switching between hidden blade, unarmed and the sword several times throughout the larger fights. Can't wait what they'll do with AC3.

Luggage wrote:

I actually found the combat to be one of the few strong points of AA. To be fair though, I hate the slow motion take down of the last enemy. At least in Enslaved I felt a sense of accomplishment whenever finishing of the last mech, in AA it's just whichever enemy happened to stand last when I finished mashing the square button, so the slow-mo is actually an anti-climactic instead of bad-ass moment. With the standard thugs you encounter in the first 3 hours, it doesn't even matter if there is 2 or 8 of them. Maybe they get tougher later in the game, but again, I shouldn't have to play several hours to encounter the first exhilaration situation.

And since you brought up AC2, I think AC2 is superior to AA in every way. I enjoyed the combat there so much more as well, since it's way more tactical and has you switching between hidden blade, unarmed and the sword several times throughout the larger fights. Can't wait what they'll do with AC3.

To be honest, you actually might just be way more skilled at games than me. That might have something to do with it.

Luggage wrote:

And since you brought up AC2, I think AC2 is superior to AA in every way. I enjoyed the combat there so much more as well, since it's way more tactical and has you switching between hidden blade, unarmed and the sword several times throughout the larger fights. Can't wait what they'll do with AC3.

I found the exact opposite, the combat in AC2 (and AC, and AC:B, and probably AC:R) devolved into counter-kills with the hidden blade. AC:B made this faster with the chain system, but it was still just waiting for the attack then cleaning the floor with everyone. I thought AA did a much better job of keeping you engaged in the battle, with more enemies who are immune to certain attacks, and more dangerous attacks that you have to deal with first.

ahrezmendi wrote:
Luggage wrote:

And since you brought up AC2, I think AC2 is superior to AA in every way. I enjoyed the combat there so much more as well, since it's way more tactical and has you switching between hidden blade, unarmed and the sword several times throughout the larger fights. Can't wait what they'll do with AC3.

I found the exact opposite, the combat in AC2 (and AC, and AC:B, and probably AC:R) devolved into counter-kills with the hidden blade. AC:B made this faster with the chain system, but it was still just waiting for the attack then cleaning the floor with everyone. I thought AA did a much better job of keeping you engaged in the battle, with more enemies who are immune to certain attacks, and more dangerous attacks that you have to deal with first.

Quite possible. Unfortunately, I never got far enough into AA to experience that. And at times when my backlog is around 50 games, a game has 30 minutes to excite me. Half of which AA wastes with it's very predictable and unnecessarily long on-rails intro level.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

To be honest, you actually might just be way more skilled at games than me. That might have something to do with it.

Unlikely. Until recently, I played every game on the easiest difficulty and I am still often struggling with normal difficulty or sometimes just standard jumping puzzles.

Luggage wrote:
ahrezmendi wrote:
Luggage wrote:

And since you brought up AC2, I think AC2 is superior to AA in every way. I enjoyed the combat there so much more as well, since it's way more tactical and has you switching between hidden blade, unarmed and the sword several times throughout the larger fights. Can't wait what they'll do with AC3.

I found the exact opposite, the combat in AC2 (and AC, and AC:B, and probably AC:R) devolved into counter-kills with the hidden blade. AC:B made this faster with the chain system, but it was still just waiting for the attack then cleaning the floor with everyone. I thought AA did a much better job of keeping you engaged in the battle, with more enemies who are immune to certain attacks, and more dangerous attacks that you have to deal with first.

Quite possible. Unfortunately, I never got far enough into AA to experience that. And at times when my backlog is around 50 games, a game has 30 minutes to excite me. Half of which AA wastes with it's very predictable and unnecessarily long on-rails intro level.

You know, you're right about that slow start. I remember playing the demo before the game came out and was extremely underwhelmed. I ended up getting the game after seeing the reviews, though, and at some point, everything clicked.

It is a crazy long intro, but I thought it was pretty sweet as a Batman fan. Mark Hamill voicing the Joker is amazing, and walking through Arkham all slow and seeing other characters along the way was very cool

Yeah, that intro was incredibly long, though I agree with Citizen86 that it has some fantastic stuff in. I get a kick out of just listening to Mark Hamill perform all those lines. That said, the game does pick up very quickly once you get past that, and it rapidly throws you into some cool situations, and moves you into new areas of the asylum.

Now that I think on it, there's a lot that AC:B seemed to take from AA, and that's a good thing. The chain kills, plus the ability to do dual-kills with certain weapons (short sword + hidden gun namely) are all straight out of AA. I've been playing AC:B lately, and the combat actually reminds me a lot of AA. I should stop relying so much on hidden blade counters, it's just they're so effective!

I played most of Batman: AA before I felt the combat had finally clicked with me. To be honest, it wasn't until I started doing the combat challenges that I had the "ah ha!" of mastering both chains and variety.

Quintin_Stone wrote:

I played most of Batman: AA before I felt the combat had finally clicked with me. To be honest, it wasn't until I started doing the combat challenges that I had the "ah ha!" of mastering both chains and variety.

Perhaps you mean "master" it, because if you're going to get through those later combat challenges, you really need to click with it.

I think that's why I liked the combat challenges so much though, mastering the combat felt very rewarding

Yep. 100%-ing AA is so fun I did it 3 times.

Luggage wrote:

L's Backloggery[/url]]...If this is a Zelda-like, it reminded me why I abandoned that genre of games long ago.

.

First I've seen AA referred to as Zelda like. I thought it felt way more like Metroid.

*Edit - looks like I'm guilty of skimming, see where this was discussed further on the previous page.

Stele wrote:

Yep. 100%-ing AA is so fun I did it 3 times. ;)

We have known the pain of that unskippable intro multiple times.

Actually went through it again the other day just to see the PhysX stuff, since my old card couldn't handle that.

Bonus_Eruptus wrote:

Actually went through it again the other day just to see the PhysX stuff, since my old card couldn't handle that.

I wonder if mine can now... What is in the game that needs PhysX other than Batman's cape though?

Citizen86 wrote:
Bonus_Eruptus wrote:

Actually went through it again the other day just to see the PhysX stuff, since my old card couldn't handle that.

I wonder if mine can now... What is in the game that needs PhysX other than Batman's cape though?

From what I could see, blowing newspapers with no wind source in a hallway, and big hanging banners over the scanning tunnel you take Joker through (where one of the predator challenges is set).

Bonus_Eruptus wrote:
Citizen86 wrote:
Bonus_Eruptus wrote:

Actually went through it again the other day just to see the PhysX stuff, since my old card couldn't handle that.

I wonder if mine can now... What is in the game that needs PhysX other than Batman's cape though?

From what I could see, blowing newspapers with no wind source in a hallway, and big hanging banners over the scanning tunnel you take Joker through (where one of the predator challenges is set).

I am so in

A question for anybody that played this with keyboard and mouse. How the hell do you do the hacking thing? I accidentally did it once but can't figure out how I did it. I've been switching to my controller every time to do it and that's getting annoying.

If I remember correctly, you just move the mouse and hold the left/right(?) button down. That's from my experience with the demo, though.

Edit: Wopps. Thought I was in the AC thread. It might be the same. I really don't remember.

Edit 2: Actually, isn't it A/D + Mouse?

Hyetal wrote:

Edit 2: Actually, isn't it A/D + Mouse?

It says A, D, mouse 1 and mouse 2. Moving the mouse doesn't seem to have any effect. I think the two mouse buttons are suppose to correspond to which stick is being rotated if you're using a controller. A and D are the rotation but it doesn't seem to lock the position.

edit: I hate to say it, because the game was a huge piece of sh*t, but I wish it worked like the one in Hydrophobia.

http://forums.eidosgames.com/showthr...

A/D corresponds to his left thumb while M1/M2 corresponds to his right thumb.

Hyetal wrote:

http://forums.eidosgames.com/showthr...

A/D corresponds to his left thumb while M1/M2 corresponds to his right thumb.

That makes much more sense than what I was thinking.