Bioshock 2 Catch-All

Hm maybe that's why I couldn't finish it...

I keep meaning to go back and try again... it's taunting me in my "now playing" list on backloggery, although it's been there since like May.

IMAGE(http://images.wikia.com/gurennlagann/images/1/1c/TTGL13.jpg)

[size=20]PIERCE THE HEAVENS WITH YOUR DRILL![/size]

I never used the drill- at least not often. I love the fiddly traps you can use before you start a large encounter. It's what a lot of people disliked, but what I really enjoyed about the game.

demonbox wrote:

I never used the drill- at least not often. I love the fiddly traps you can use before you start a large encounter. It's what a lot of people disliked, but what I really enjoyed about the game.

I'd string up so may traps, etc it looked like christmas morning in a crazy person's house.

The trapping was the best part of the game. That and drill dashing people in the face from across the room.

Yeah, trap like mad then Drill Rush was my play style. Running out of fuel was heart breaking.

I dunno -- I enjoyed the "everyone engulfed in a ball of flame right before being pinned to the object behind them" method of play.

Plus, you just go pick your ammo back up.

I think whether you like Bioshock 2 has a lot to do with why you liked Bioshock 1. BS2 could really be an expansion pack to BS1--it uses the same assets and is set in rapture at the same time as the BS1 story. So it's really just an excuse to explore more of Rapture and kill more Splicers. This wasn't enough for me, and I quit about 3/4 of the way through the game. My tendency as a completionist is the only reason I lasted that long. I was bored after a few hours of play.

Bioshock 2 takes place 8 years after the events of Bioshock 1. A huge part of the story revolves around the facts that Lamb filled the power vacuum after Fontaine and Ryan died, and that they've been kidnapping kids to make new Little Sisters after Jack released most of the original ones.

Oh that's right. For some reason I keep thinking that Rapture ended up filled with water at the end of Bioshock 1, despite all the lead-up to Bioshock 2 that places it clearly after Bioshock 1. Oh well. For me, the story of Bioshock was really the store of Rapture, and that story was told to completion in Bioshock 1. So learning about a few more people who inhabited Rapture didn't really say anything I found interesting, since it seemed to me just like more of the same. I had fun for a while beating up Slicers with my fancy new Big Daddy weapons and then I was pretty much done with Bioshock 2. From how people feel about Bioshock 2 though, I think I'm very much in the minority for being so indifferent towards the game. In fact, that's really why I stuck with it so long. I felt like there was something about it that I had to be missing. Turns out there wasn't, but rather that what I was looking for was a completely new context rather than refinement within the existing context.

Well, it's the story from an entirely different point of view, for one, and it's really got an opposite philosophical question behind it as opposed to the first game. The first is rampant individualism, the second collectivism, and I loved how they weaved together. With the second, you really do start out as a faceless, empty death machine, but the sound recordings and your eventual meeting of . . .

Spoiler:

Eleanor

Starts to give you a backstory and a lot of emotional investment. The game was kind of flat until partway through Siren's Alley when you get to make a moral choice, and that really started the hooks. Really. There was a bit near the end where

Spoiler:

Lamb, pillow, Eleanor, heartbeat, if you've played it you know what I mean

Where I realized I'd been staring at the screen open mouthed for about ten seconds, and I had forgotten to breathe. Really one of the singly most compelling gaming moments I've ever had.

For me, one of the reasons the BS2 plot doesn't resonate (in addition to the slow first half) is that it's a bit handwavey "don't worry about the details". BS1 by comparison is a very simple, but well executed story, a power struggle for the city.

Big spoilers if you're coming to BS2 fresh

Spoiler:

BS2 comes along with a whole load of "just trust me on this..." moments, I can let a few slide, but too many and it falls under it's own weight. Eleanor will conquer the world.... somehow. Cramming all the personalities into her will make her a utopian... whatever that is and what whatever that does for her. Gilbert Alexander being transformed into utopian v1 helps them... somehow.

I guess what they were going for was a big collective mind of everyone, or no 'self's

Scratched, those are explained in the various recordings:

Spoiler:

Lamb wants to put everyone's personalities into Eleanor (via ADAM) in order to create a literal collective. Rather than having a philosophical or political collective that is many bodies working in concert, it's a literal collective where everyone's mind is in the same body.

The original plan was to do this with Gil Alexander, but he wasn't able to contain the multitude of personalities, was driven mad, and has his body corrupted by the ADAM. It was decided to use Eleanor instead because as a Little Sister she was able to absorb the people and their memories without going insane.

As to how and why she would conquer the world, that's mainly a question of just how powerful she is. It's a variation on the old super being thing. Essentially, she is what Fontaine was trying to be: the ultimate tonic-infused badass.

I have put a good 8 hours in over the last 2 weeks. Just set foot into Dionysus Park. I am absolutely loving it. There really is no such thing as too much of a good thing. Being a Big Daddy is badass and they did a really good job recreating (and maybe even surpassing) the dread of fighting the first Big Daddies in BS1 with the Big Sisters in this one. The story is nicely crafted again and all threads seem to meet at the same point somewhere down the road. But that doesn't mean much. I am kinda waiting for the big reveal or turn around moment like the Ryan encounter in the first one. Especially being about halfway through. Will Eleanor be good or bad? Should I have killed Holloway? Why should I trust Sinclair? And where the heck is Tenenbaum?
I also enjoy the nuances that tell how they learned from the first one. The use of light sources and shadows to introduce the first Spider and Houdini slicers was brilliant. Crafted snapshots of the insanity that has befallen Rapture like the adult booths in Pink Pearl, the the audio log of the spliced up call girl and the story of Mark Meltzer.

Sooo gooood...!

PS: Did somebody else chuckle when finding the audiolog of a certain Jackie Rodkins in Pauper's Drop? Idle Thumbs easter egg?

Hurray! I'm happy it was worth the trouble of getting everything up and running, Luggage. I can't wait to hear your thoughts after completing the game. Take your time and enjoy it.

I'm definitely on board with the trapping awesomeness. It made for some of the most fun combat I've had in a long time.
I didn't use the drill and found the encounters generally more tense because of it.
Argh, now I want Bioshock: Split Infinitive or whatever it's called to be released soon. I think we still have like a bajillion more days until that happens.

One question that's probably of no consequence

Spoiler:

Did they ever say who Eleanor's biological father was?

I don't remember them ever making a big deal out of Sofia Lamb being pregnant at some point and giving birth, just that she's recruited to Rapture, works on her collectivism ideals, has a child and when she is imprisoned that she has to foster her with Holloway.

Eleanor calls you her father because of the little sister/big daddy conditioning, and there's doesn't seem more to it than that

Spoiler:

It's never revealed in the game, although according to the bioshock wikia, it was meant to be revealed that the player character was Eleanor's biological father as well, but they (wisely, IMO) decided to cut it.

It may ruin my chances of getting the "good ending", but I killed Stanley Poole this morning. Stinkin' lil moocher snitch!

Luggage wrote:

It may ruin my chances of getting the "good ending" but I killed Stanley Poole this morning. Stinkin' lil moocher snitch!

Minor spoiler, the ending isn't binary like BS1.

Oh, did I mention that I am the element-wielding beekeeper of swirling death? Ever since I found the Drill Specialist gene tonic in the gallery of Dionysus Park, I have been one happy big daddy. When adding the right tonics to increase elemental damage and lower EVE consumption, it’s a very viable way to play. I never played Bioshock that much as a shooter anyway, so being a steampunk wizard under the sea is one of my favorite videogame things ever.

I finished the game Friday night. And I have to say right off the bat, that these may have been the best invested 13 hours in any video game ever. It was such a nice and seamless continuation of the world Irrational crafted with Bioshock 1, that I wondered if the story wasn't written to span both games to begin with. I firmly place both games in my top 10 of all time list. So many things were better, it's hard to start anywhere.

  • The writing, art design and soundtrack were so perfectly in tune with each other. Future immersive games like Dishonored, BS Infinite and Thief 4 will for sure be measured against this in my book.
  • I don't know how they did it, but I felt so much more protective of the little ones this time around. Maybe the whispering in your ear?
  • Seeing the world through the little sisters eyes alone was worth buying the game.
  • The opportunities to kill the three side characters all had me stare at the screen for minutes, before making my decision.
  • No ouvert scares like room goes dark and being swarmed or spawning splicers in behind you in dead-ends.
  • No huge overhaul of guns and toys, but instead nice additions and refinement (hacking tool, research cam).
  • I didn't think they could surpass the terror of fighting big brothers, but the big sisters definitely achieved that.
  • More plasmids, more tonics, more fun. I hinted at it above, Drill Specialist and supporting tonics are a huge game changer.
  • The last level respected the player and the story. No tacked on boss fight which would have been impossible to balance against weapon and plasmid focused playstyles. Instead it turned the "Delta against Rapture" vibe up to 11.

The only thing I found regretful was that Tenenbaum vanished partway through the game and never resurfaced. Maybe I'll meet her again in Minerva's Den (which I started yesterday)?

Also, in case Levine ever reads this: why are all little sisters brunette?

Luggage wrote:
  • Seeing the world through the little sisters eyes alone was worth buying the game.

Yes, this was awesome and eerie and actually added to the fiction of the world in an interesting way.

Arise!

I picked this game back up a week ago after not having played it for a full year. It wasn't really clicking for me. However, now that I've just finished Dionysus Park, I'm really feeling it. I think I was underpowered early in the game, and the narrative wasn't really driving me. However, the last bits leading up to Dionysus Park really advanced both issues.

Finally I advanced enough that I had some decent traps and plasmids to get me through the Adam collection. I've unlocked all of the weapons (hello, launcher!), and I've reached the point where Big Daddies aren't really a big problem.

I really think they did a great job getting you to care about the little sisters, with their cute bare feet plopping in the water as the crawl into the vents.

Good stuff...I'm hoping to finish it within another week, and I'm loving it now.

Finished! I could use more!

demonbox wrote:
Luggage wrote:
  • Seeing the world through the little sisters eyes alone was worth buying the game.

Yes, this was awesome and eerie and actually added to the fiction of the world in an interesting way.

I really liked this part. Clever way to do it. It's also just cool to see how a video game can readily show you the same structures in two very different ways.

This was a great experience. I'm happy I finally got back into BS2. Definitely a worthy successor to the original. They really did a nice job of continuing the great artwork and thought that goes into creating a believable Rapture.

You should get Minerva's Den. Possibly the best DLC/expansion pack I've ever played.

Hyetal wrote:

You should get Minerva's Den. Possibly the best DLC/expansion pack I've ever played.

I've been on the fence about it...and very close to grabbing it. You've pushed me over the edge!

Frickin' enablers...

firesloth wrote:
Hyetal wrote:

You should get Minerva's Den. Possibly the best DLC/expansion pack I've ever played.

I've been on the fence about it...and very close to grabbing it. You've pushed me over the edge!

Frickin' enablers...

You should be enabled for this one. Everybody should be enabled for this one. I cannot say enough good things about Minerva's Den.

I think this is also a good example of the sort of DLC that's really cool: a parallel and alternate story in the same universe. They must have put a lot of work into it. Well worth my investment, I guess!

Hyetal wrote:

You should get Minerva's Den. Possibly the best DLC/expansion pack I've ever played.

I think that's the solid truth. I remember the big debacle with how delayed it was (and whether or not it was ever going to arrive) for the PC; it was well worth the wait.