Questions you want answered.

Chumpy_McChump wrote:
strangederby wrote:

In English Language video games why is S higher than A?

Why can't there be a simpler easily understood system of ranking?

I enjoy that the answer is essentially “because it’s not an English language ranking system”. :D

Right but English language games from non English language speaking countries (like the Yakuza series or Dark Souls for instance) are translated into English or given English subtitles.

maverickz wrote:
strangederby wrote:

In English Language video games why is S higher than A?

Why can't there be a simpler easily understood system of ranking?

https://tiermaker.com/blog/news/15/s....

Er, I don't know what's up with that article but almost everything in it is wrong

The real answer is: it's from Japanese "特" and originally stood for English "special", or possibly "star".

The tl;dr is, in Japanese when there are several variations of something it's common for a separate, higher-ranked option to be prefixed with "特", pronounced "toku" and meaning "special", and the "S" prefix comes from that.

The grisly details from a half-hour of googling are: in the 70s and before some theatres and railways used "S-" as a prefix for their highest tier of seat or ticket, and it was used similarly in a few other industries. Then in the 1980s Keirin (horse racing but for bicycles) adopted a ranking system where "S-class" was the highest tier of rider. Keirin defined it to mean "star class", but it would be inspired by 特/special. It entered the anime/manga world in 1989 when a manga called Spriggan had "S-class agents", and apparently the first gaming use was King of Fighters in 1994, which could have borrowed it from any of the preceding usages.

Suffice to say that it definitely doesn't stand for "sugoi" (which wouldn't be used that way) or "shuu" (which is not a thing).

fenomas wrote:
maverickz wrote:
strangederby wrote:

In English Language video games why is S higher than A?

Why can't there be a simpler easily understood system of ranking?

https://tiermaker.com/blog/news/15/s....

Er, I don't know what's up with that article but almost everything in it is wrong

The real answer is: it's from Japanese "特" and originally stood for English "special", or possibly "star".

The tl;dr is, in Japanese when there are several variations of something it's common for a separate, higher-ranked option to be prefixed with "特", pronounced "toku" and meaning "special", and the "S" prefix comes from that.

The grisly details from a half-hour of googling are: in the 70s and before some theatres and railways used "S-" as a prefix for their highest tier of seat or ticket, and it was used similarly in a few other industries. Then in the 1980s Keirin (horse racing but for bicycles) adopted a ranking system where "S-class" was the highest tier of rider. Keirin defined it to mean "star class", but it would be inspired by 特/special. It entered the anime/manga world in 1989 when a manga called Spriggan had "S-class agents", and apparently the first gaming use was King of Fighters in 1994, which could have borrowed it from any of the preceding usages.

Suffice to say that it definitely doesn't stand for "sugoi" (which wouldn't be used that way) or "shuu" (which is not a thing).

Thank you for the clarification!

maverickz wrote:
fenomas wrote:
maverickz wrote:
strangederby wrote:

In English Language video games why is S higher than A?

Why can't there be a simpler easily understood system of ranking?

https://tiermaker.com/blog/news/15/s....

Er, I don't know what's up with that article but almost everything in it is wrong

The real answer is: it's from Japanese "特" and originally stood for English "special", or possibly "star".

The tl;dr is, in Japanese when there are several variations of something it's common for a separate, higher-ranked option to be prefixed with "特", pronounced "toku" and meaning "special", and the "S" prefix comes from that.

The grisly details from a half-hour of googling are: in the 70s and before some theatres and railways used "S-" as a prefix for their highest tier of seat or ticket, and it was used similarly in a few other industries. Then in the 1980s Keirin (horse racing but for bicycles) adopted a ranking system where "S-class" was the highest tier of rider. Keirin defined it to mean "star class", but it would be inspired by 特/special. It entered the anime/manga world in 1989 when a manga called Spriggan had "S-class agents", and apparently the first gaming use was King of Fighters in 1994, which could have borrowed it from any of the preceding usages.

Suffice to say that it definitely doesn't stand for "sugoi" (which wouldn't be used that way) or "shuu" (which is not a thing).

Thank you for the clarification!

Here I am still struggling to think of a single game where this is actually a thing. Anybody care to post a few examples just to set my mind at ease?

Devil May Cry

Ridge Racer.

edit
I could find confirmation of Ridge Racer (PS1) having an s class or s rank but I’m pretty sure it did. It originally released in 1993, which predates King of Fighters by 1 year.

edit2
Also Resident Evil 1 on PS1. Is this a Namco thing?

Chocobos in FF7

Bayonetta as well, IIRC.

One Punch Man... though not a video game, uses similar rankings.

I think it's also become common in the fighting game community when people make their own tier lists, regardless of whether the game ranks characters that way.

The Attack on Titan games have the S-rank as well. Same with Hatsune Miku or Taiko no Tatsujin. Essentially any Japanese-based game that has ranking will use the S rank to mean top tier.

It's the standard in almost any Japanese game that involves collecting things, which means most anything mobile or F2P. Actually it's so standard that most games extend it, to SS, SSS, S++, etc.

I think what my question boils down to is why is the ranking not translated into English with the rest of the game?

Upgrade modules in No Man's Sky, which isn't even a Japanese made or inspired by game. Very weird.

Monster Rancher on the PS1.

Lots of Japanese card or character collecting games with loot crates.

strangederby wrote:

I think what my question boils down to is why is the ranking not translated into English with the rest of the game?

Adds a bunch of work to the localization form relatively little benefit?

strangederby wrote:

I think what my question boils down to is why is the ranking not translated into English with the rest of the game?

Because it's in English already? I guess the localizers could have changed it, but it would seem like an odd choice.

Also, the nuance with S is meant to be that it's not just one more step in a series, but a separate "off the charts" kind of rating. So changing it to A+ or something would change the meaning in that sense.

Forza Horizon has car classes of D, C, B, A, S1, S2, and X in increasing order of eliteness, and neither Turn 10 nor Playground Games is from Japan!

Meanwhile, in Japan, someone is explaining to someone else that the reason we skip E to make F the lowest grade is that in English it stands for "fail."

BadKen wrote:

Forza Horizon has car classes of D, C, B, A, S1, S2, and X in increasing order of eliteness, and neither Turn 10 nor Playground Games is from Japan!

The licences in Gran Turismo also go B, A, S (and Rally but that's a separate category)

BadKen wrote:

Forza Horizon has car classes of D, C, B, A, S1, S2, and X in increasing order of eliteness, and neither Turn 10 nor Playground Games is from Japan!

Motorsport has a long and storied history of nonsensical car-class letters/numbers.

Jonman wrote:
BadKen wrote:

Forza Horizon has car classes of D, C, B, A, S1, S2, and X in increasing order of eliteness, and neither Turn 10 nor Playground Games is from Japan!

Motorsport has a long and storied history of nonsensical car-class letters/numbers.

Not sure how directly they’re related, but tire load and speed ratings are pretty whack also.
Why use letters to denote the speed rating (the maximum speed the tire is designed to go) instead of numbers in the first place? Why is the H speed rating in between T and V? Why are load ratings numbers that bear absolutely no relation to the actual load the tire can carry?

And those are just the numbers that don’t make sense—the tire size numbers (e.g., 225/50r17, with 225 being the width of the tire in mm, 50 being the height of the sidewall expressed as a percentage of the width, so in this example 125mm, and r17 being the size of the rim in inches the tire is supposed to go on) have a logic behind them, but they’re just gibberish to most people. Working at a Costco tire shop, a good portion of my job is explaining this nonsense to people.

Should I feel guilty laughing at Ricky Berwick videos?

Max,
I won’t let you goad me into watching that! XD

I always thought the “S” was for super. Street Fighter’s fault.

Chumpy_McChump wrote:

Bayonetta as well, IIRC.

Really, anything from Platinum Games, including when they were Clover with Viewtiful Joe.

Okay, assume I am really, really stupid, but can someone explain to me how Space-based solar power works as if I am.... well, an idiot?

Like, I get how satellites could ostensibly absorb energy from the sun and store it in batteries or whatever. What I don't understand is how they can "beam" that energy to the earth and have it still be energy we could use to create electricity? Like, I'm baffled how that works.

I would assume it is just a bigger version of wireless power used for lights and phones. I mean the wireless type that don't require contact. I don't know if the phones are widely out anywhere but you can buy the lights now. I seen them for lego and gundams.

Prederick wrote:

Okay, assume I am really, really stupid, but can someone explain to me how Space-based solar power works as if I am.... well, an idiot?

Like, I get how satellites could ostensibly absorb energy from the sun and store it in batteries or whatever. What I don't understand is how they can "beam" that energy to the earth and have it still be energy we could use to create electricity? Like, I'm baffled how that works.

According to Arthur C Clarke, magic.

Well, I'm no expert, but I think the article you linked provides at least some conceptual answer. The atmosphere interferes with a percentage of the solar energy hitting our planet. Collecting solar energy in space is better. Presumably, the solution is to collect solar energy in space, and transmit that power wirelessly to the Earth via a method that is not disrupted by the atmosphere.

It might seem like science fiction, but really, it just sounds to me like collecting the energy in one form and transmitting it in another. Will there be loss? Sure. But as long as the loss is not worse than simply collecting solar energy at the surface, it's a net gain.

After all, the sun is wirelessly transmitting energy to the planet all the time.

Prederick wrote:

What I don't understand is how they can "beam" that energy to the earth and have it still be energy we could use to create electricity? Like, I'm baffled how that works.

Did you ever see the movie Real Genius where they popped a house full of popcorn with a big sky laser? Like that but from space.

Does Google advertising actually work? I have adblockers mostly; except on mobile. I try to avoid my data being mined, but I have used plenty of Google products over the years so I'm under no illusion my buying habits are secret.

But for me, and for anyone I know, the advertising is no more targeted than a random TV ad. On YouTube I get Zalando and Takeaway.com every single time, and if I get any ads online it's always just the last thing I looked at on Amazon or the likes.

So what's the use of all that data mining, is there even any?