Questions you want answered.

McIrishJihad wrote:

Men's pants are sold by the measurement of waist and inseam

True, but not all tape measures are created equally. I know I wear different sizes from brand to brand. Plus, their are many categories. Levi has 5 for their jeans.

I'm not saying men are under the same magnifying glass as women when it comes to size and fashion. For example, a well fitted suit will always be in style, but fashion for women changes on a seasonal basis. Their is a little more to men's clothing than two numbers.

No, but there is a greater range of hip-waist-inseam variation for actual women, which is not captured at all by the single size number given for women's clothing sizes.

If you have a man's waist and inseam sizes, you have a better chance of buying him pants that fit well than if I say to you, "oh, I'm a size 12 regular" and send you to buy me pants.

Also, bear in mind that this is a surprise gift. Asking for measurements would give away the surprise.

Katy wrote:

No, but there is a greater range of hip-waist-inseam variation for actual women, which is not captured at all by the single size number given for women's clothing sizes.

If you have a man's waist and inseam sizes, you have a better chance of buying him pants that fit well than if I say to you, "oh, I'm a size 12 regular" and send you to buy me pants.

*nod nod* Sizes can get you into the right ballpark--but for something to actually fit, you're probably going to need at least size and brand, and the only way to really be sure is if the recipient has already tried the item on.

Anyway, I think that for gifts the best you can do is: Go ahead and look at sizes of existing clothing. Check sizes separately for tops and bottoms, and take whatever numbers seem to be most common in the items that they actually wear. If you're feeling like a real go-getter, keep track of sizes by brand in case your gift is one of those brands. Go for the larger of the two sizes on full-body stuff. That will be enough to say "I cared to make an effort, and have some idea what size you wear."

Afterwards: don't be surprised when the item gets exchanged because it doesn't fit.

I'm still in the camp of the "gift" being a gift card and offer to go shopping, so she gets exactly what she wants.

I also bought my wife a new jacket for our anniversary last month, but that was made easy on me - she tried things on in the store, with the intention of coming back later to get something custom ordered, so they staff wrote down what she was looking at. A quick and subtle pic on my phone, and I went back a week later to place the order for her, and picked it up the following week.

Rallick wrote:

Also, bear in mind that this is a surprise gift. Asking for measurements would give away the surprise.

I actually don't really get the entire surprise thing, either. It's always seemed to me that this was more for the benefit of the surprisers than it was for the surprisee. I enjoy anticipation as well as receiving things I really want, so surprising me with something just robs me of the anticipation. I dunno.

It's almost like different people like different things.

carrotpanic wrote:

It's almost like different people like different things.

I said I didn't get it. I didn't say people were wrong to not be like me. There is no cause for snide remarks.

What's to get? Your remark was snide.

carrotpanic wrote:

What's to get? Your remark was snide.

It wasn't. You may understand, but I do not. What's to get? Well, everything! It totally makes no sense to me. It's a perfectly honest question, without any snide content whatsoever.

Caveman Lawyer

LarryC wrote:

I actually don't really get the entire surprise thing, either. It's always seemed to me that this was more for the benefit of the surprisers than it was for the surprisee. I enjoy anticipation as well as receiving things I really want, so surprising me with something just robs me of the anticipation. I dunno.

I have a friend who also dislikes surprises (and birthdays). He went on holiday to the Philippines not long ago and really loved it. If he makes it back there one day, you two should totally high-five.

I can understand both perspectives, and I like surprise gifts to and from people that are close to me.

mudbunny wrote:

Root through your wife's closet until you find a style of clothing that is similar to what you want to buy. Bring it into the store and say "This fits her", and the staff, if they ave a clue, will do the fitting and matching for you.

Also, gift receipt.

Depending on the store, I wouldn't really count on the assistants getting it exactly right. So +1 to gift receipt

So-called "vanity sizing" has made buying a gift of clothing a perilous, if not impossible, task, regardless of the recipient's gender. Interestingly, I have suspected that the ongoing electronics boom (phones, tablets, touch-this, scribble-that) was greatly accelerated by the simple fact that it's now darn near impossible to buy an ordinary gift of clothing for anyone.

LarryC wrote:
Rallick wrote:

Also, bear in mind that this is a surprise gift. Asking for measurements would give away the surprise.

I actually don't really get the entire surprise thing, either. It's always seemed to me that this was more for the benefit of the surprisers than it was for the surprisee. I enjoy anticipation as well as receiving things I really want, so surprising me with something just robs me of the anticipation. I dunno.

Horses for Courses, as my friend Jonman likes to say. I have some loved ones who love being surprised, and prefer it to knowing that a gift is coming. Myself, I'm with you on enjoying the anticipation.

Case in point. I love surprises. My wife hates them. H-A-T-E-S them. In a fairly typical incident, I'll start a movie for us to watch, she'll ask me what it is as the studio logo is playing, I'll respond "Just watch. It's a surprise." she'll then threaten to stab me through the eye with a steak knife if I don't tell her, right now, what the movie is even though the credits will be coming up in 30 seconds. She has made it abundantly clear that she derives only feeling of anger and sometimes homicidal rage, at "suprises".

Kehama wrote:

Case in point. I love surprises. My wife hates them. H-A-T-E-S them. In a fairly typical incident, I'll start a movie for us to watch, she'll ask me what it is as the studio logo is playing, I'll respond "Just watch. It's a surprise." she'll then threaten to stab me through the eye with a steak knife if I don't tell her, right now, what the movie is even though the credits will be coming up in 30 seconds. She has made it abundantly clear that she derives only feeling of anger and sometimes homicidal rage, at "suprises".

I can relate to your wife. I definitely wouldn't agree to spend two hours of time on a completely unknown movie.

Demyx wrote:
Kehama wrote:

Case in point. I love surprises. My wife hates them. H-A-T-E-S them. In a fairly typical incident, I'll start a movie for us to watch, she'll ask me what it is as the studio logo is playing, I'll respond "Just watch. It's a surprise." she'll then threaten to stab me through the eye with a steak knife if I don't tell her, right now, what the movie is even though the credits will be coming up in 30 seconds. She has made it abundantly clear that she derives only feeling of anger and sometimes homicidal rage, at "suprises".

I can relate to your wife. I definitely wouldn't agree to spend two hours of time on a completely unknown movie.

Theoretically you'd have *some* idea of what you were watching once the opening title sequence plays...maybe 8 to 10 minutes into the film. Not two hours.

I've known people who have such reactions to surprises. It seems to be due in part to an extreme aversion to potential disappointment.

ringsnort wrote:

Theoretically you'd have *some* idea of what you were watching once the opening title sequence plays...maybe 8 to 10 minutes into the film. Not two hours.

I've known people who have such reactions to surprises. It seems to be due in part to an extreme aversion to potential disappointment.

I'd feel bad about getting ten minutes into a movie and then being like "no, I don't want to watch this, sorry." I'd much rather prefer to be upfront.

But then, I'm also super adverse to all surprises in general. I even have trouble watching suspenseful movies.

Demyx wrote:
ringsnort wrote:

Theoretically you'd have *some* idea of what you were watching once the opening title sequence plays...maybe 8 to 10 minutes into the film. Not two hours.

I've known people who have such reactions to surprises. It seems to be due in part to an extreme aversion to potential disappointment.

I'd feel bad about getting ten minutes into a movie and then being like "no, I don't want to watch this, sorry." I'd much rather prefer to be upfront.

But then, I'm also super adverse to all surprises in general. I even have trouble watching suspenseful movies.

Ditto. Edwin likes surprises and I hate them, so I'm the custodian of all approved surprise-making in our house. Even our vacations work that way... once I got him halfway to Hawaii before he figured out where we were going.

But I grew up in pretty unpredictable places, so surprises don't usually signal "fun" to me... more like "oh jeebus what's this going to turn out to be?"

Demyx wrote:
ringsnort wrote:

Theoretically you'd have *some* idea of what you were watching once the opening title sequence plays...maybe 8 to 10 minutes into the film. Not two hours.

I've known people who have such reactions to surprises. It seems to be due in part to an extreme aversion to potential disappointment.

I'd feel bad about getting ten minutes into a movie and then being like "no, I don't want to watch this, sorry." I'd much rather prefer to be upfront.

But then, I'm also super adverse to all surprises in general. I even have trouble watching suspenseful movies.

A good surprise giver is like a good gift giver. It takes someone who understand you, what you like, your sense of humor, and knows what touches your heart. It's tough to pull off consistently, even for the people who know you best. I get why someone would be far more comfortable avoiding the surprise thing altogether.

clover wrote:

once I got him halfway to Hawaii before he figured out where we were going.

Please tell me waiting outside the gate for a plane to Hawaii was when he figured it out...and not like, ON the plane

McIrishJihad wrote:
clover wrote:

once I got him halfway to Hawaii before he figured out where we were going.

Please tell me waiting outside the gate for a plane to Hawaii was when he figured it out...and not like, ON the plane :D

We waited at a different gate across the way, during our layover, until final boarding call.

(the gate agent knew, so it was ok)

Why can't I rent Skyfall any where online? Sure, I can buy it here but I just want to rent.

Trashie wrote:

Why can't I rent Skyfall any where online? Sure, I can buy it here but I just want to rent.

It's on Netflix now which may or may not be part of the answer to your question.

Trashie wrote:

Why can't I rent Skyfall any where online? Sure, I can buy it here but I just want to rent.

It's on Amazon Prime Instant Watch for free as of a few days ago

Trashie wrote:

Why can't I rent Skyfall any where online? Sure, I can buy it here but I just want to rent.

It was mentioned that it's free to stream if you have Amazon Instant Prime. I dunno if you can rent it off Amazon, though. Yeah, I hate when they lock up movies like that as buy only. It's ridiculous.

My wife loves surprises but hates anticipation.
There's a birthday present for her that has been sitting in the downstairs bathroom (ostensibly 'my' office (edit: the downstairs, not the bathroom)) for the last few days. She knows about it but has no idea what it is. It's another week until it's officially her birthday. I know she hasn't peeked yet, but it has come up a few times that maybe we should just do the present thing early. Sadly I'm a jerk and enjoy pushing her antici...
...
... pation as far as I can for my own amusement.

Question time!
This year I paid a guy to mow my lawn. I think it's time to own a mower/trimmer.
We have a steep hill (it's flat enough to grow grass and you can climb it, but a few more degrees and it would probably be considered a cliff.) so I am considering an electric push mower for the reduced weight. (probably corded because battery longevity is still an issue)
Any impressions or recommendations from people that have owned one?
I've checked out a few models online and reviews seem to be all over the place regarding power, build quality, predominant use of cheap plastic in the housing, that sort of thing.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:
Trashie wrote:

Why can't I rent Skyfall any where online? Sure, I can buy it here but I just want to rent.

It was mentioned that it's free to stream if you have Amazon Instant Prime. I dunno if you can rent it off Amazon, though. Yeah, I hate when they lock up movies like that as buy only. It's ridiculous.

Perfect! Thanks all. Our Prime account is in my wife's name so I didn't check that option.

Rezzy wrote:

Question time!
This year I paid a guy to mow my lawn. I think it's time to own a mower/trimmer.
We have a steep hill (it's flat enough to grow grass and you can climb it, but a few more degrees and it would probably be considered a cliff.) so I am considering an electric push mower for the reduced weight. (probably corded because battery longevity is still an issue)
Any impressions or recommendations from people that have owned one?
I've checked out a few models online and reviews seem to be all over the place regarding power, build quality, predominant use of cheap plastic in the housing, that sort of thing.

Hovermower!

IMAGE(http://eastmanind.com/Portals/3/HOVER%20MOWER/Hover%20with%20bail_Medium.jpg)

Disclaimer: I don't actually suggest cutting a whole lawn with a hovermower. It's really only good for cutting grass on steep hills.

nihilo wrote:

Disclaimer: I don't actually suggest cutting a whole lawn with a hovermower. It's really only good for cutting grass on steep hills.

Interesting! I will need to see how these compare price-wise to a solution that would work for the hill and my flat yard sections.