Questions you want answered.

The sheriff. I was asked how educated they were. I assume there's a minimum requirement to be a policy officer. High school perhaps?

Whenever I see the word sheriff, I immediately think of this guy:

IMAGE(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/b/b9/FileRobinhood140.jpg/200px-FileRobinhood140.jpg)

So, if I were to answer your question, the answer would be "not very".

1Dgaf wrote:

The sheriff. I was asked how educated they were. I assume there's a minimum requirement to be a policy officer. High school perhaps?

Each county/state has their own standards and policies. Where is the sheriff you're talking about?

KingGorilla wrote:
1Dgaf wrote:

How educated are sheriffs?

Do you mean the sheriff him/herself or deputies as well?

He said the sheriff. But he didn't say the deputies.

Gravey wrote:
KingGorilla wrote:
1Dgaf wrote:

How educated are sheriffs?

Do you mean the sheriff him/herself or deputies as well?

He said the sheriff. But he didn't say the deputies.

By and large to be elected sheriff in a given county in the US is about age and election registration guidelines. By and large there is not a requirement of education, a particular degree the same way Attorneys General, District Attorneys, Judges must be.

As an Example, in Ohio:
http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/311.01

They do basically require that you are a police officer, or were a police officer.

But there are some states and counties that are as simple as age and residency requirements.

Similarly, for coroner (another elected county position), not all states require that the candidate be a licensed physician.

Thanks King.

Momgamer,

Ozarks in particular.

The Ozarks are hunks of two different states, Missouri and Arkansas. Is there a specific county you have in mind? Often the Sheriff (generally equivalent to a police chief) is elected, and his deputies are hired.

Yeah. I agree with you. Thing is, the skillset is different. If you're talking about the guy running the police force, it's not how fast he can run down that shoplifter that matters. It's riding herd on a flock of uniformed guys as they try to uphold the law that is more important. I would rather have an ex-middleschool principle than an ex-military guy, all other things being equal. The "cop" skills can be taught. The people skills are harder. Adding the need to get elected actually helps with that, IMHO.

momgamer wrote:

Yeah. I agree with you. Thing is, the skillset is different. If you're talking about the guy running the police force, it's not how fast he can run down that shoplifter that matters. It's riding herd on a flock of uniformed guys as they try to uphold the law that is more important. I would rather have an ex-middleschool principle than an ex-military guy, all other things being equal. The "cop" skills can be taught. The people skills are harder. Adding the need to get elected actually helps with that, IMHO.

I dunno. The ex-military guy would have plenty of experience riding herd on a flock of uniformed guys, wouldn't he?

FYI: I shot the sheriff... but I did not shoot the deputy.

No, sorry. We were watching Winter's Bone and the question came up. Which I should have mentioned to begin with.

I think I've got the same attitude to the police as I do the army. Of course one wants people in authority to be as educated as possible, but it's more important that they are good people and good at their jobs.

EDIT

Christian and Taney counties, Missouri.

Jonman wrote:
momgamer wrote:

Yeah. I agree with you. Thing is, the skillset is different. If you're talking about the guy running the police force, it's not how fast he can run down that shoplifter that matters. It's riding herd on a flock of uniformed guys as they try to uphold the law that is more important. I would rather have an ex-middleschool principle than an ex-military guy, all other things being equal. The "cop" skills can be taught. The people skills are harder. Adding the need to get elected actually helps with that, IMHO.

I dunno. The ex-military guy would have plenty of experience riding herd on a flock of uniformed guys, wouldn't he?

That would depend on what he did while he was in the military.

Jonman wrote:
momgamer wrote:

Yeah. I agree with you. Thing is, the skillset is different. If you're talking about the guy running the police force, it's not how fast he can run down that shoplifter that matters. It's riding herd on a flock of uniformed guys as they try to uphold the law that is more important. I would rather have an ex-middleschool principle than an ex-military guy, all other things being equal. The "cop" skills can be taught. The people skills are harder. Adding the need to get elected actually helps with that, IMHO.

I dunno. The ex-military guy would have plenty of experience riding herd on a flock of uniformed guys, wouldn't he?

There's a curious misperception amongst a good portion of the population that military people in general and military officers in particular lack people skills. I blame Hollywood, with a special nod to Jack Nicholson's portrayal in A Few Good Men. Funnily enough, most of the military leaders (senior NCOs and officers) I've served with have demonstrated excellent people skills. Hell, the admiral running Walter Reed right down is one of the most personable people I've met in a long time.

Coldstream wrote:

There's a curious misperception amongst a good portion of the population that military people in general and military officers in particular lack people skills. I blame Hollywood, with a special nod to Jack Nicholson's portrayal in A Few Good Men. :D

I blame the scads of military people I've met who have great people skills if by people skills you mean "an expectation that you will obey them without question by dint of their having decided that they're in charge". I've met plenty of military people with great people skills, but I've also met many, many military people, especially officers, who are terrible at relating to people outside of very strictly hierarchical situations.

ClockworkHouse wrote:

"an expectation that you will obey them without question by dint of their having decided that they're in charge".

Wait, you're implying that there's a different type of people skill?

Coldstream wrote:
ClockworkHouse wrote:

"an expectation that you will obey them without question by dint of their having decided that they're in charge".

Wait, you're implying that there's a different type of people skill? ;)

Sorry, dude. Clocky beat me to it. I've had to take the bark back off my elder son a couple times since he got out.

I've known plenty of military men, and many of them do well in the police force. But some don't, because they can't get out of that attitude, and they have a tendency towards wholly disproportionate responses. That sort of thing is good when you're herding a flock of punks through a pass in The 'Gan. Not so much when you've got a set of civilian laws and you can't just treat everyone like a terrorist.

The principal is used to having to deal within those boundaries.

Is space an issue? Does it have to be a filling cabinet or shredder? Could it be a filing cabinet?

Space isn't an issue. Its the fact that I have paper everywhere and want to put it away or just recycle it.

Should I get a filling cabinet? or a decent shredder?

JohnKillo wrote:

Space isn't an issue. Its the fact that I have paper everywhere and want to put it away or just recycle it.

Shredder then!

IMAGE(http://www.pokemonsux.com/shredder.jpg)

Sorry about hogging the thread. One more question for the day. A good coffee maker? I don't want to go crazy on one but I would like to purchase one as a gift for the wifey. Price range: 200 dollars ish.

momgamer wrote:
Coldstream wrote:
ClockworkHouse wrote:

"an expectation that you will obey them without question by dint of their having decided that they're in charge".

Wait, you're implying that there's a different type of people skill? ;)

Sorry, dude. Clocky beat me to it. I've had to take the bark back off my elder son a couple times since he got out.

I've known plenty of military men, and many of them do well in the police force. But some don't, because they can't get out of that attitude, and they have a tendency towards wholly disproportionate responses. That sort of thing is good when you're herding a flock of punks through a pass in The 'Gan. Not so much when you've got a set of civilian laws and you can't just treat everyone like a terrorist.

The principal is used to having to deal within those boundaries.

That's true. Treating everyone like a terrorist is kinda nuts, and I remember having to speak to some of my subordinates about going over the edge. Ultimately, being a good leader is about connecting to others on a human level that inspires their loyalty and trust, without connecting so far as to entangle oneself in the morass of day-to-day stuff. Also, how is it that I can still think about this stuff logically when full of tequila? Shalalm baskur, my friends. Shalalm baskur.

Excess paper; If you have a lot then bag it up and drop it at the nearest print or post shop that offers bulk shredding, a fed ex here did it at $5 for a garbage bag full of paper which was well worth the huge time savings over feeding sheets into a shredder manually, waiting for it to cool down to do more, etc.

Coffee maker; Are you looking for a ground beans method of brewing or a machine that uses those little cups/pods/packs (eg; tassimo, keurig, etc)?

Coldstream wrote:
momgamer wrote:
Coldstream wrote:
ClockworkHouse wrote:

"an expectation that you will obey them without question by dint of their having decided that they're in charge".

Wait, you're implying that there's a different type of people skill? ;)

Sorry, dude. Clocky beat me to it. I've had to take the bark back off my elder son a couple times since he got out.

I've known plenty of military men, and many of them do well in the police force. But some don't, because they can't get out of that attitude, and they have a tendency towards wholly disproportionate responses. That sort of thing is good when you're herding a flock of punks through a pass in The 'Gan. Not so much when you've got a set of civilian laws and you can't just treat everyone like a terrorist.

The principal is used to having to deal within those boundaries.

That's true. Treating everyone like a terrorist is kinda nuts, and I remember having to speak to some of my subordinates about going over the edge. Ultimately, being a good leader is about connecting to others on a human level that inspires their loyalty and trust, without connecting so far as to entangle oneself in the morass of day-to-day stuff. Also, how is it that I can still think about this stuff logically when full of tequila? Shalalm baskur, my friends. Shalalm baskur.

Baskur shalalm, my friend! Be safe and have fun. And remember Rule #1.

Coldstream wrote:
momgamer wrote:
Coldstream wrote:
ClockworkHouse wrote:

"an expectation that you will obey them without question by dint of their having decided that they're in charge".

Wait, you're implying that there's a different type of people skill? ;)

Sorry, dude. Clocky beat me to it. I've had to take the bark back off my elder son a couple times since he got out.

I've known plenty of military men, and many of them do well in the police force. But some don't, because they can't get out of that attitude, and they have a tendency towards wholly disproportionate responses. That sort of thing is good when you're herding a flock of punks through a pass in The 'Gan. Not so much when you've got a set of civilian laws and you can't just treat everyone like a terrorist.

The principal is used to having to deal within those boundaries.

That's true. Treating everyone like a terrorist is kinda nuts, and I remember having to speak to some of my subordinates about going over the edge. Ultimately, being a good leader is about connecting to others on a human level that inspires their loyalty and trust, without connecting so far as to entangle oneself in the morass of day-to-day stuff. Also, how is it that I can still think about this stuff logically when full of tequila? Shalalm baskur, my friends. Shalalm baskur.

Baskur shalalm, my friend! Be safe and have fun. And remember Rule #1.

How can you f*ck up the subtitles on Empire Strikes Back? It's on TV now, with Han Solo on his 'tonton' and Luke going to the 'Dagovar' system.

Is the warranty I bought on my car in 2009 only valid for the dealership that I bought it at, or any dealership for Honda? I've moved since I bought it, but I want to make sure that when I get my car serviced for a part failing next weekend that I don't have to drive an hour to go to the dealership I bought it at.

I even bought an extended warranty so it is covered for a full two years after I'm done paying the car off.

Yes, this may be a dumb question.

Vrikk wrote:

Is the warranty I bought on my car in 2009 only valid for the dealership that I bought it at, or any dealership for Honda? I've moved since I bought it, but I want to make sure that when I get my car serviced for a part failing next weekend that I don't have to drive an hour to go to the dealership I bought it at.

I even bought an extended warranty so it is covered for a full two years after I'm done paying the car off.

Yes, this may be a dumb question.

Should be valid at any dealer, if it's a Honda warranty. That's assuming you didn't buy a used car from a dealership that sold you their own warranty. But if it says Honda on your warranty paperwork, you should be golden.

Coldstream wrote:

Should be valid at any dealer, if it's a Honda warranty. That's assuming you didn't buy a used car from a dealership that sold you their own warranty. But if it says Honda on your warranty paperwork, you should be golden.

Yeah. Just make sure you follow their maintenance schedule to the tee. And keep all the records. 3 months before my extended 6 year warranty expired, I moved to a new city. 1 month before the warranty expired, my timing belt blew (it was a warranty replacement already). They went through every single bill I had to make sure I had every single required oil change in the 6 years. They did end up honouring the warranty in the end.