Questions you want answered.

wordsmythe wrote:

I don't think there's an upper bound on Vit. D, but I'd check into calcium. The upper bound might be closer to 1000%, but I think there is one.

I'm not worried about the calcium myself. The two vitamins combined is 80% DRV of calcium and the rest of my diet is mostly potatoes, rice, pasta, bread, and pizza.

Thanks for the responses.

As I don't care enough to google it:

What is the Z in "ZOMG" supposed to mean? Anything at all, or is it another one of those retarded internet memes like "pwn" and "noobs" and l33t speak?

PS. I will like your answer more if it pertains somehow to zombies than I would if it didn't, so bear that in mind...

I think it's because the space between "z" and "shift" is so small. It is easy to type "zomg" when you want to type "OMG." "pwn" is definitely because of the short distance between "p" and "o."

It's a retarded internet meme perpetrated by typing zombies with clumsy fingers.

Why can my friend hear what is happening on my desktop when I don't have a headset or microphone plugged into my computer, and he only has his headset plugged in? Is there a hidden microphone somewhere near my system, or is there a link established whenever we play Dawn of War II together online?

Clemenstation wins! Although I was hoping it was more that zombies had a secret underground society, from which they communicate over the internet, and hide little messages to each other by throwing a Z into the line somewhere. *szigh*

Vrikk wrote:

Why can my friend hear what is happening on my desktop when I don't have a headset or microphone plugged into my computer, and he only has his headset plugged in? Is there a hidden microphone somewhere near my system, or is there a link established whenever we play Dawn of War II together online?

There is a microphone somewhere. Or, maybe your friend is very close?

I considered making another thread for this, but i'm almost positive that either I or someone else has posted about this before:

I'm looking to buy a used car. I don't have much money, maybe $2000-5000 max and I have no idea what the hell i'm doing, mostly. I'm not in the market to be picky, i'd settle with something that looked straight out of Beyond Thunderdome but i'd like something that wouldn't break down after i've had it under a year. I've heard that the low-end Asian cars are good to look at, Toyota Camry, Nissan Sentra, etc. because they last a long time. Obviously i'm not Joe Mechanic so i'd rather avoid cars that need work. If it's something stupid simple like slapping a new air filter in there, fine, but nothing a service manual and a basic set of tools (I mean BASIC) couldn't handle. As such, I don't want to get something on it's deathbed, hovering around 180,000+ miles. That said, it's pretty difficult to find anything around the $2000 or even $3000 mark that doesn't have 150,000+ miles on it.

Any tips? Anyone have any experience with government/business auctions? I know you can get a perfectly decent ride for stupid cheap at those. Also any tips you have for actually inspecting cars when looking them over would be appreciated, anything I should look for (leaks, etc.) that would be warning signs to failure.

Vrikk wrote:

Why can my friend hear what is happening on my desktop when I don't have a headset or microphone plugged into my computer, and he only has his headset plugged in? Is there a hidden microphone somewhere near my system, or is there a link established whenever we play Dawn of War II together online?

It is possible that your webcam has a microphone. I know mine does, and it can be very inconvenient if not dealt with appropriately...

WipEout wrote:

Clemenstation wins! Although I was hoping it was more that zombies had a secret underground society, from which they communicate over the internet, and hide little messages to each other by throwing a Z into the line somewhere. *szigh*

Sorry to disappoint... but I speak only ztruth!

Asz wrote:

I wanna car.

Go to CarMax. That's where I bought my last car. Sticker price is what you pay and no bullsh*t. And if you go to their website http://www.carmax.com you can see what they have on the lot for your price range. If they have a car at another location, they can move it to your area so you can test drive it. Last March, we saw the car we wanted on-line one morning (2006 Volvo XC-90) and I went and bought it during my lunch break. Very easy to deal with and I'm very happy with the service.

Asz wrote:

I'm looking to buy a used car.

A few things I've picked up along the way:
-work out what you want and what you need (not always the same thing). big car for hauling your stuff, small for getting around a city, what gadgets, what size gear/people are you transporting around, what size engine you need. Hopefully you can eliminate a lot of cars into yes/no/maybes when looking at listings or around a forecourt.
-If you can get a friendly petrolhead to come along with you to help, do so. Chances are they can spot something you miss and wouldn't think about. You can also pay for an inspection if you've got a car you like but want assurance on that it's a good buy.
-Search on the internet for the model of car you're interested in, you will pick up common faults from forums and buyers guides (I used parkers.co.uk in the uk)
-Generally, look for a good condition car. Ideally things shouldn't be held together with tape and wire and unexplainable leaks.
-Get the keys and fire up the engine. It should be easy to start and smooth running, revving the engine shouldn't send a cloud of smoke out the exhaust.
-Take it for a drive, besides the weirdness of driving a different car, it should handle well and do what you want of it when you want it. If you accelerate then suddenly take your foot off the gas, it shouldn't come out of gear.
-Look at the paintwork, on a sunny day if you can. look along the lines of the car (so your view is parallel to the panel) for any bumps or ripples in the reflection, or bubbles under the paintwork which usually means rust. Pay attention to the skirts at the bottom and around the edges of doors and door frames. This will hopefully let you spot places where something has happened to it, or where it'll need attention in the future.
-Tyres should be evenly worn
-If it has a good service record you can see what has happened to the car in it's life. Things like how often it's been serviced (and how long since it's last service), what repairs, what's been replaced.
-If you pick up on something that will need work and you're buying from a dealer where they have some garage/workshop facility, see if they can do the work before you buy it.
-Look at a variety of places to get an idea in your head of what's available, in what condition, at what prices. There are always cars being sold, so if you can take your time, do so to get a good car.

One thing i've learned with cars, they will take money to maintain, I don't think any car is immune to requiring work during it's life, and during the period you own it too.

Marsman wrote:
Asz wrote:

I wanna car.

Go to CarMax. That's where I bought my last car. Sticker price is what you pay and no bullsh*t. And if you go to their website http://www.carmax.com you can see what they have on the lot for your price range. If they have a car at another location, they can move it to your area so you can test drive it. Last March, we saw the car we wanted on-line one morning (2006 Volvo XC-90) and I went and bought it during my lunch break. Very easy to deal with and I'm very happy with the service.

I wouldn't mind picking up a car at dealership, but I'm 99% positive I won't qualify for any form of financing without a co-signer of which I have none with credit better than mine.

Rallick wrote:
Vrikk wrote:

Why can my friend hear what is happening on my desktop when I don't have a headset or microphone plugged into my computer, and he only has his headset plugged in? Is there a hidden microphone somewhere near my system, or is there a link established whenever we play Dawn of War II together online?

It is possible that your webcam has a microphone. I know mine does, and it can be very inconvenient if not dealt with appropriately...

I don't have a webcam, and my headset is unplugged.

Reading the restaurant eating habits thread made me think of this, but it's a bit off topic, so I'll post it here:

Why do people refer to pizzas as pies? Pies are made with pastry and a filling. Pizzas are stuff on bread. And besides there is already a perfectly good word for pizzas: Pizza.

I was reading something wich contained the words "handout photo". What is the difference between that and a normal photo?

Koning_Floris wrote:

I was reading something wich contained the words "handout photo". What is the difference between that and a normal photo?

Someone gives you a handout photo, whereas normal photos are kept by those who take them?

pignoli wrote:

Reading the restaurant eating habits thread made me think of this, but it's a bit off topic, so I'll post it here:

Why do people refer to pizzas as pies? Pies are made with pastry and a filling. Pizzas are stuff on bread. And besides there is already a perfectly good word for pizzas: Pizza.

While it may be bread, generally it's referred to as "crust," and as such, it's really not all that different from a pie that does not have crust covering the top. Compared to more pastry-like crusts, pizzas and pies are not all that dissimilar. It's not a stretch to see where the usage of that term comes from.

If you really want to get picky, the "stuff on bread" description much better fits something like bruschetta.

NSMike wrote:
pignoli wrote:

Reading the restaurant eating habits thread made me think of this, but it's a bit off topic, so I'll post it here:

Why do people refer to pizzas as pies? Pies are made with pastry and a filling. Pizzas are stuff on bread. And besides there is already a perfectly good word for pizzas: Pizza.

While it may be bread, generally it's referred to as "crust," and as such, it's really not all that different from a pie that does not have crust covering the top. Compared to more pastry-like crusts, pizzas and pies are not all that dissimilar. It's not a stretch to see where the usage of that term comes from.

If you really want to get picky, the "stuff on bread" description much better fits something like bruschetta.

Hmm, I was more interested in whether there was anything specific that started the trend (like some sort of famous chef referring to his pizzas as pies or something, rather than it just seeping into common usage) than a defence of it's use. Whilst I do understand it, I'm afraid it will always be nonsensical to me. Pizzas are pizzas and pies are pies, why deliberately confuse them (which is what makes me think there must be a good reason that people started doing it in the first place)?

Well, then...

"When the moon hits your eye, like a big pizza pie, that's amore..."

pignoli wrote:
NSMike wrote:
pignoli wrote:

Reading the restaurant eating habits thread made me think of this, but it's a bit off topic, so I'll post it here:

Why do people refer to pizzas as pies? Pies are made with pastry and a filling. Pizzas are stuff on bread. And besides there is already a perfectly good word for pizzas: Pizza.

While it may be bread, generally it's referred to as "crust," and as such, it's really not all that different from a pie that does not have crust covering the top. Compared to more pastry-like crusts, pizzas and pies are not all that dissimilar. It's not a stretch to see where the usage of that term comes from.

If you really want to get picky, the "stuff on bread" description much better fits something like bruschetta.

Hmm, I was more interested in whether there was anything specific that started the trend (like some sort of famous chef referring to his pizzas as pies or something, rather than it just seeping into common usage) than a defence of it's use. Whilst I do understand it, I'm afraid it will always be nonsensical to me. Pizzas are pizzas and pies are pies, why deliberately confuse them (which is what makes me think there must be a good reason that people started doing it in the first place)?

So how would you refer to a pizza pie then? Pizza loaf?

Trainwreck wrote:
pignoli wrote:
NSMike wrote:
pignoli wrote:

Reading the restaurant eating habits thread made me think of this, but it's a bit off topic, so I'll post it here:

Why do people refer to pizzas as pies? Pies are made with pastry and a filling. Pizzas are stuff on bread. And besides there is already a perfectly good word for pizzas: Pizza.

While it may be bread, generally it's referred to as "crust," and as such, it's really not all that different from a pie that does not have crust covering the top. Compared to more pastry-like crusts, pizzas and pies are not all that dissimilar. It's not a stretch to see where the usage of that term comes from.

If you really want to get picky, the "stuff on bread" description much better fits something like bruschetta.

Hmm, I was more interested in whether there was anything specific that started the trend (like some sort of famous chef referring to his pizzas as pies or something, rather than it just seeping into common usage) than a defence of it's use. Whilst I do understand it, I'm afraid it will always be nonsensical to me. Pizzas are pizzas and pies are pies, why deliberately confuse them (which is what makes me think there must be a good reason that people started doing it in the first place)?

So how would you refer to a pizza pie then? Pizza loaf?

I think we've hit the Atlantic! I have never come across 'pizza pie' this side of the pond... Is it a pizza with thick base? They usually get branded 'deep pan' here.

NSMike wrote:

Well, then...

"When the moon hits your eye, like a big pizza pie, that's amore..."

That'll be stuck in my head for the day now!

pignoli wrote:
NSMike wrote:
pignoli wrote:

Reading the restaurant eating habits thread made me think of this, but it's a bit off topic, so I'll post it here:

Why do people refer to pizzas as pies? Pies are made with pastry and a filling. Pizzas are stuff on bread. And besides there is already a perfectly good word for pizzas: Pizza.

While it may be bread, generally it's referred to as "crust," and as such, it's really not all that different from a pie that does not have crust covering the top. Compared to more pastry-like crusts, pizzas and pies are not all that dissimilar. It's not a stretch to see where the usage of that term comes from.

If you really want to get picky, the "stuff on bread" description much better fits something like bruschetta.

Hmm, I was more interested in whether there was anything specific that started the trend (like some sort of famous chef referring to his pizzas as pies or something, rather than it just seeping into common usage) than a defence of it's use. Whilst I do understand it, I'm afraid it will always be nonsensical to me. Pizzas are pizzas and pies are pies, why deliberately confuse them (which is what makes me think there must be a good reason that people started doing it in the first place)?

I think it was originally introduced as a type of pie, and the language and product evolved to what you know today*.

What you know today in the UK is not pizza. In my experience, you have to go to a place that advertises "Chicago style" pizza in order to even get close to a standard pan pizza we're accustomed to in the states. If you think that's actually what we eat in Chicago, you are woefully mistaken.

Koning_Floris wrote:

I was reading something wich contained the words "handout photo". What is the difference between that and a normal photo?

Did it involve someone of "celebrity"? I've heard that term used for the glossy headshots that news and television folks sign and hand out.

Oh, I didn't even realize pignoli was in the UK. No, any place that accepts corn as a pizza toping isn't allowed to say they have anything like pizza there.

NSMike wrote:

Oh, I didn't even realize pignoli was in the UK. No, any place that accepts corn as a pizza toping isn't allowed to say they have anything like pizza there.

Corn as in "maize," or "corn" as in "some grain that is definitely not corn"?

wordsmythe wrote:
NSMike wrote:

Oh, I didn't even realize pignoli was in the UK. No, any place that accepts corn as a pizza toping isn't allowed to say they have anything like pizza there.

Corn as in "maize," or "corn" as in "some grain that is definitely not corn"?

Corn as in the kind of bright yellow corn that comes in cans in the supermarket. On top of a cheese-and-tomato-topped slab of bread.

Corn, as in maize, is one of the best pizza toppings around. Frozen or fresh, never canned.

Corn, spinach, tomatoes, fresh basil, and sauce on a home-made crust with a hint of balsamic vinegar baked into it: heaven.

If he had an actual Chicago style pizza, that thing pretty much is a pie. That's a fairly new type of pizza though. I usually get a plain pizza, so a Chicago style is pretty much a can of tomato sauce and so I never eat it. East coast pizza! This heated pizza discussion must rise, but not too much, the thin crust is so good.

Wow, I've opened a can of worms here! I have a feeling this is going to culminate in my buying a book on the history of pizza:) Although according to wikipedia, the 'pizza pie' thing is dialectal, with 'pie' being an abbreviation thereof. Whereas the whole pie/thick base thing seems to come from this, so now I'm just confused.

NSMike wrote:

Oh, I didn't even realize pignoli was in the UK. No, any place that accepts corn as a pizza toping isn't allowed to say they have anything like pizza there.

Hehe, well I guess I should defer to the better judgment of those who invented (at least one type of) it, [size=4]but I do like a good sweetcorn and chicken pizza.[/size]

pignoli wrote:

Hehe, well I guess I should defer to the better judgment of those who invented (at least one type of) it, [size=20]but I do like a good sweetcorn and chicken pizza.[/size]

Do you see what he tries to hide?! Atrocity!