Amazon Kindle -- A Year Later?

Also, many small time authors and up and comers have their books priced at $1-3 (occasionally free). So, if you're sick of high prices, it might be time to branch out a bit.

Yeah, I've found a lot of decent self-published authors. It's neat watching them improve as you read through a series too.

What sort of battery life are you seeing on your paperwhites? With the Wifi on, it seems like it's a few days at most. Is that right?

Robear wrote:

What sort of battery life are you seeing on your paperwhites? With the Wifi on, it seems like it's a few days at most. Is that right?

I get a couple weeks, or more, with the wifi on. I think I've charged mine three times since November.

TheCounselor wrote:
Robear wrote:

What sort of battery life are you seeing on your paperwhites? With the Wifi on, it seems like it's a few days at most. Is that right?

I get a couple weeks, or more, with the wifi on. I think I've charged mine three times since November.

I'm getting about 2-3 weeks on mine. Wi-fi is on, but I'm reading less than an hour a day on weekdays. A little longer on weekends.

Never tried running mine down completely though.

I've contacted Amazon once about their pricing. My complaint was that the digital copy was sometimes even more expensive than a dead tree edition.
The reply basically stated that they don't set the price, but the publisher does.
An answer I couldn't care less about. It is Amazon's store, they sell it. How they get to price a book is one thing, but passing the buck like that, is just not good enough of an answer for me.

Changing countries also gives you a better price at times, another bullsh*t something. Same in gaming, say Steam with euro trash
pricing.

So here is how I do it. If I own the book already, I find a digital copy somewhere and read that. I've paid for the book once, not
going to pay again.
Otherwise, I look at sales and also have a $5 limit. The traditional pricing is bs and should change.

Sparhawk wrote:

It is Amazon's store, they sell it. How they get to price a book is one thing, but passing the buck like that, is just not good enough of an answer for me.

That's fair, but it's also not aligned with the market: Amazon can't do anything about publisher-set prices, so what else can they say to you? Table stakes for using a Kindle are that you'll pay more for the experience now than you would if you were buying dead-tree versions of those books. Perhaps it shouldn't be that way, but I don't think Amazon can do much about it.

TheHipGamer wrote:
Sparhawk wrote:

It is Amazon's store, they sell it. How they get to price a book is one thing, but passing the buck like that, is just not good enough of an answer for me.

That's fair, but it's also not aligned with the market: Amazon can't do anything about publisher-set prices, so what else can they say to you? Table stakes for using a Kindle are that you'll pay more for the experience now than you would if you were buying dead-tree versions of those books. Perhaps it shouldn't be that way, but I don't think Amazon can do much about it.

There's a bunch of legal stuff, but the short version is that Apple got the ball rolling on the publishers insisting on a different legal relationship between them and the resellers, and they all put pressure on Amazon to let them use that model in Amazon's store too, or Amazon couldn't sell their books. It actually lead to a class action lawsuit by several states against the publishers.

The basics, as I understand them (IANAL) is that physical books use the wholeseller model, where Amazon pays a set wholesale price to the publisher for the copies of the book, and can then sell them for whatever they want. This is what was going on when the prices on ebooks were $10 or less. The new model is the agency model, where the store acts as an agent for the publisher, takes a % of each sale, but the publisher retains control of the copies of the books and can dictate what price the books are sold for.

So for the publishers that use the agency model (most of them), Amazon really DOESN'T have any control over the price. Based on how hard they pushed the $10 and under pricing when the Kindles were first out, I'm pretty sure that Amazon would absolutely love to be able to charge less for Kindle books, but can't.

PaladinTom wrote:
TheCounselor wrote:
Robear wrote:

What sort of battery life are you seeing on your paperwhites? With the Wifi on, it seems like it's a few days at most. Is that right?

I get a couple weeks, or more, with the wifi on. I think I've charged mine three times since November.

I'm getting about 2-3 weeks on mine. Wi-fi is on, but I'm reading less than an hour a day on weekdays. A little longer on weekends.

Never tried running mine down completely though.

Same here. I don't think to charge it now because it holds a charge better than my Kindle Keyboard.

Sparhawk wrote:

I've contacted Amazon once about their pricing. My complaint was that the digital copy was sometimes even more expensive than a dead tree edition.
The reply basically stated that they don't set the price, but the publisher does.
An answer I couldn't care less about. It is Amazon's store, they sell it. How they get to price a book is one thing, but passing the buck like that, is just not good enough of an answer for me.

Changing countries also gives you a better price at times, another bullsh*t something. Same in gaming, say Steam with euro trash
pricing.

If I remember correctly amazon used to set their own prices but then they got sued or whatever and now they have to let the book publishers set the price. So not really their fault at all they tried.

Sparhawk wrote:

So here is how I do it. If I own the book already, I find a digital copy somewhere and read that. I've paid for the book once, not
going to pay again.
Otherwise, I look at sales and also have a $5 limit. The traditional pricing is bs and should change.

I actually do the same thing here. Over the years I have acquired many dead trees and unfortunately never gotten around to reading many of them. I look at it the same way everybody but the music industry did when we ripped our music CD's to MP3 format. I already payed for the content now I just want to consume it in the way I want to.

Actually it was Apple that got sued. When they launched iBooks or whatever (which have taken off like wildfire...) they worked with publishers to change the pricing model, thus forcing Amazon to do the same or risk losing access to those books. They actually got sued for collusion and lost.

http://money.cnn.com/2012/10/15/technology/amazon-apple-ebook-credit/index.html

Sparhawk wrote:

I've contacted Amazon once about their pricing. My complaint was that the digital copy was sometimes even more expensive than a dead tree edition.

I guess my question is why you would think that the digital edition should cost less than the physical edition. I understand that the physical edition has material that the digital edition doesn't, but that's not solely (or even primarily) a factor in the price of a book. The cost of goods to make the physical product is nominal, and thus doesn't factor into the pricing. The digital version offers more conveniences and benefits, and thus you're paying for those features.

According to the link above, the cost of printing a hardcover book is about $2-$3. However, hardcovers list for $25 to $30, where e-books list for $10-$15. You're still saving money over hardcovers, or the same as trade paperbacks generally cost.

Yeah. It has to be noted that when you buy a book you're paying for the efforts of the writer. You're paying for the editing (hopefully there was editing). You're paying for advertising. You're paying for the existence of any infrastructure that moves a book from someone's brain to your Kindle. Amazon has shortened that path with their self-publishing initiative. We'll see if that's for good or bad in the long run. Either way eBooks aren't as dominant as you might think. 22% of the market, currently. So most people are just buying discount books or used books and that's how they're saving money.

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/digital/retailing/article/54609-e-books-market-share-at-22-amazon-has-27.html

I'm cautiously okay with paying the same for the electronic version as I do for the paper one. The moral problem I have is when the paper one is cheaper, which it frequently is in paperback. Granted, it's usually only a few dollars cheaper, but for a sub-$10 item, that's a decent % discount. Still, it's really more of a moral stand that I want to take that publishers pricing ebooks higher because they can is a practice that I won't support.

Chaz wrote:

I'm cautiously okay with paying the same for the electronic version as I do for the paper one. The moral problem I have is when the paper one is cheaper, which it frequently is in paperback. Granted, it's usually only a few dollars cheaper, but for a sub-$10 item, that's a decent % discount. Still, it's really more of a moral stand that I want to take that publishers pricing ebooks higher because they can is a practice that I won't support.

Well, to be fair, publishers really aren't pricing them higher. Publishers price the paperbacks about what the trades cost, but due to the physical nature of the trades, retailers will discount them to move inventory. The list price is similar, most of the time.

Right, but the MSRP on most things is usually set unrealistically high with the expectation that retailers will sell at a reasonable price that the market will bear. Retailers have gotten fairly good at this, and have embraced a certain amount of price flexibility. Publishers have virtually no experience in doing this, but the new agency model for ebooks puts that power in their hands. Even worse, there's an active disincentive for them to lower their prices, since that represents a direct reduction in their revenue that they seem to be unwilling to bear.

Some good points I've read. I don't really get the one where a digital copy should cost more.
Editing is done digitally, so releasing it into any format is really just a click of a button. No shipping costs, no printing costs, world wide market.
I read the link posted. Showing why the physical product is nominal. But according to the article, it is $2.83, cut that off already and I will say
thank you. But were are not there yet. The physical product is not the same as the digital one. The digital version has its pros, but it comes
with restrictions for sure. I cannot resell, I cannot just lend it out to anyone. I'd like to see that evened out in the price as well then.

Here are the pros and cons as I see it
Dead tree edition:
Pros: my preference to hold a real book, lend it out to whoever I want to, resell it, put it on my shelf with other books
Cons: paperback released after hard cover, no updates, decay, no always easy to buy.

Digital edition:
Pros: easy to buy, updates, 10 pages or 1000 pages - same weight and same space, indexing/highlighting etc etc. You can and maybe should take out the middlemen.
Cons: release after hard cover, can't resell, can't lend it out to whomever, it's not 'the real thing'.

I live in the Caribbean and books really decay quickly here. So that's why for me it is a huge bonus, having it digitally.
My preference is having a real book in my hands. It shows how many pages it has, where I am at and I love the smell of a new book.

I felt to expand a bit more on why I put that first message out there. Not trolling or flaming, and it is actually a good and interesting discussion for sure

Some good points I've read. I don't really get the one where a digital copy should cost more.

Absent of a world of physical goods.. why should digital goods be held up to some higher (lower?) standard than "cost what people will willingly pay" ??

Good podcast on Planet Money that talked about ebooks

I thought it highlighted two big advantages to ebooks from the publisher perspective which I hadn't thought of.

1. felixible pricing. They can change the price of a book on the fly. Many of us bought Stephen King's 11/22/63 when it was $4 a few weeks ago. Publishers can't do that with a physical book.

2. in book advertising. The example they gave was a book about the history of the band Queen. In that book there are links to buy some of the songs. I can see it as a revenue stream for publishers but I don't look forward to the day when product placement becomes a factor. I imagine all sorts of companies would bid to be the car the next Dan Brown hero drives, or the dress that is worn in whatever series hits after the Hunger Games.

farley3k wrote:

2. in book advertising. The example they gave was a book about the history of the band Queen. In that book there are links to buy some of the songs. I can see it as a revenue stream for publishers but I don't look forward to the day when product placement becomes a factor. I imagine all sorts of companies would bid to be the car the next Dan Brown hero drives, or the dress that is worn in whatever series hits after the Hunger Games.

I love my kindle paper white but if they start doing that I will go back to killing trees.

breander wrote:
farley3k wrote:

2. in book advertising. The example they gave was a book about the history of the band Queen. In that book there are links to buy some of the songs. I can see it as a revenue stream for publishers but I don't look forward to the day when product placement becomes a factor. I imagine all sorts of companies would bid to be the car the next Dan Brown hero drives, or the dress that is worn in whatever series hits after the Hunger Games.

I love my kindle paper white but if they start doing that I will go back to killing trees.

Yeah, no kidding. Sell your books at the price they're worth. Revenue streams compromising the artistic integrity of a work to that degree doesn't work for me.

So is the powerfast charger worth it? I just got a kindle fire hd and thought I would use the charger for my Lumia 710 but it seems to be recharging the kindle very slowly. I'm wondering if the official charger would be better.

Listened to the podcast, some good points in there indeed

Agent 86 wrote:

So is the powerfast charger worth it? I just got a kindle fire hd and thought I would use the charger for my Lumia 710 but it seems to be recharging the kindle very slowly. I'm wondering if the official charger would be better.

I bought this charger for our holiday road trip and love it. Highly recommended.

I get a couple weeks, or more, with the wifi on. I think I've charged mine three times since November.

Dang it! I'm getting like 3 days out of mine with the wifi on. Is there a known issue with the batteries or something?

Robear wrote:
I get a couple weeks, or more, with the wifi on. I think I've charged mine three times since November.

Dang it! I'm getting like 3 days out of mine with the wifi on. Is there a known issue with the batteries or something?

I'm getting 4 ish days with wifi on, a little over 2 weeks with wifi off Robear.

Robear wrote:
I get a couple weeks, or more, with the wifi on. I think I've charged mine three times since November.

Dang it! I'm getting like 3 days out of mine with the wifi on. Is there a known issue with the batteries or something?

That's way too fast. Does it still drain even if you don't use it?

With WiFi on, reading for about an hour or so every night, I'm seeing 2+ week charge times on my Paperwhite.

I'm recharging my paperwhite pretty much weekly with WiFi turned on. I have brightness set to 21, I believe, and I've been reading quite a lot recently.

I'll let it drain and see how long it takes with wifi on. I already checked to make sure it's not indexing.