Amazon Kindle -- A Year Later?

merphle wrote:
Spoiler:

Fun fact: Did you know if you borrow a digital book from your library and then enable Airplane Mode on your e-reader, the book won't disappear at the end of your loan term? I'm still reading a book that was "returned" back to the library pool a few weeks ago. I just can't take my Kindle online again for even a second, until I'm done with it.

With library downloadable audiobooks from Overdrive, they're just straight MP3's that you can just play in any other player you have on your phone no matter when as long as you don't delete them. I use Listen on Android. Just make another folder and move them over.

Coldstream wrote:
bbk1980 wrote:

Have any of my fellow goodjers had a similar issue and found the jump to an e reader not that bad. I’d really like to try and do it to allow a bit of space back but I can’t get past my internal prejudices. Worth noting I do use a library where I can already.

You've already had some great responses. I think there's two major aspects to your question: the reading experience and the owning experience. In terms of the reading experience, the KIndle (and let's be honest, the Kindle Paperwhite is really probably what you should be considering) is lightyears better than reading a tatty paperback. Others here have already spoken to the convenience of having a large library and ease of purchase on a small device. All absolutely true.

That said, I vastly prefer a good quality hardback book in certain situations. When I'm home and want to really immerse myself in reading, I'll get one of my hardback books out and make a nice pot of tea. There's just no substitute in my mind for the tactile experience.

So I propose this solution to your dilemma: if you would read it in paperback form, then read it on a Kindle (or other similar device), as your experience will be far better. If it's a book that's meaningful or something you'll know you want to return to again and again over the years, buy it in a good-quality hardback.

The advantage to this scheme is that your physical book collection will be smaller but much higher quality, and will be nicer to look at as a bonus!

This is an outlook I have been coming around to this year. Amazon being evil and this year bumping up the probability of a complete systemic collapse of civilization has had me favoring physical books. Specifically the newer run of Dune and Frankenstein.

I think another quality of the physical books I didn't realize I valued was the perception of progress. Towards the 3/4 mark of a good book there is a sense of 'there is only so much book left' that is best expressed without units. The Kindle's tracking by page or sentence isn't the same.

For traveling I'd probably still prefer a paperwhite for the convenience of the large library and the backlight.

If civilization fails to the point where Kindles can't be charged, you're not going to be reading books lol.

My experience was similar to those above; I switched to the Kindle over a decade ago and have donated literally a room full of books to various places. But one thing no one has mentioned is that the nature of the e-ink display is such that it is just like reading a pristine, high-quality book in excellent lighting. Much easier on the eyes, as the device itself can mitigate dim light or shifting light or even "sun over the shoulder" issues. In fact, it seems easier to read in full sunlight than a regular book.

So think about adding "won't add stress to my monitor-fatigued eyes" as another advantage for the e-ink Kindles. As noted, try out a Paperwhite and see.

Robear wrote:

If civilization fails to the point where Kindles can't be charged, you're not going to be reading books lol.

The books are for the subsequent race of lizard people to learn how to civilization by counter example.

The lizard people can get a Prime membership just like we had to.

Wow thanks for all the responses. Seems like many more sensible people than I have already walked this path. Ill go and have a look at the various options, feel bad about supporting Amazon and then probably by a Paperwhite as it seems to be the most regularly used. Hopefully I can start moving some of our rooms back to being able to see the walls! Is a downside my heating bills go up because I am not insulating as much?

*puts on lizard person garb so she can keep reading books during the collapsed civilization*

I'll just add that if you don't like the fact that eBooks (from any vendor) have DRM, you can easily strip away the DRM. They're yours after all - you paid for them.

eBooks are incredibly small and easy to back up and archive.

I forgot to mention before - if you've already signed your soul over to Jeff Bezos and buy a lot of stuff from Amazon with a Prime membership, consider opting for the greater-than-2-day shipping option for things that you don't necessarily need right away, when the option is incentivized with a few dollars of credit. It adds up, and can be used to purchase digital goods such as eBooks.

Paper white is nice. I love mine.
I prefer reading on the kindle as a rule and sometimes check an ebook out from the library rather than read the print copy I own. I love being able to enlarge the font and read in bed without a light on.

I couldn’t imagine getting rid of my print books though. I easily have over 100 in the living room right now and own about 3000. I would miss physical copies tremendously. I find it frustrating not to be able to lay out all my ebooks like I do at times with print books I’m reading. I use the kindle iPad app for any illustrations or photos, but reading on kindle is much nicer than on a phone or tablet. My husband has taken an older kindle of mine and likes it more than reading on his phone.

Good luck! But don’t get rid of print copies you care about. Not everything is available as ebooks.

If you do get interested in a Kindle Unlimited subscription, Amazon has a 40% sale at least a couple of times a year. I expect one is coming up around Christmas.

LeapingGnome wrote:

If you do get interested in a Kindle Unlimited subscription, Amazon has a 40% sale at least a couple of times a year. I expect one is coming up around Christmas.

Even better, you can sign up for the trials, get 2-3 months for free (or close to free), then cancel at the end. Wait a couple of months and they'll allow you to use a free trial again.

I've signed up multiple times like this.

I just looked and you can get two months now for free on my account:

https://www.amazon.com/kindle-dbs/hz...

For those that still want to purchase some physical books, you can use bookshop.org which helps support indie/local book stores nationwide. Some of the books give you the option to purchase the ebook or audiobook through a partner site that isn't Amazon. So this can be a solid alternative to the Bezos marketplace. I've used it this past semester for my physical books and I've been happy with their service.

If anyone is interested I just posted my Kindle Oasis - 9th gen for sale on swappa. Great little machine but I just don't use it enough.

https://swappa.com/listing/view/LUNE...

bbk1980 wrote:

Have any of my fellow goodjers had a similar issue and found the jump to an e reader not that bad. I’d really like to try and do it to allow a bit of space back but I can’t get past my internal prejudices. Worth noting I do use a library where I can already.

I've had this discussion 5 or 6 times now with various extended family members and one friend whose daughter was a voracious reader. In all instances, after I failed to convince them to make the jump, I simply bought them the base Kindle and a book I recommended at the next Christmas/birthday and in all instances they never went back to physical books for anything other than "pictures matter here."

Down with regular books!

So with some extra spending money left after Christmas I have ordered a kindle paperwhite without ads. At least I can still read it in the bath! Fingers crossed I can connect with it and at least reduce the paperback. Thanks all for the help!

Ok after a couple of weeks and three books the kindle is great especially for bulky things. I can read in bed without disturbing my partner using the light and I love the time to end of chapter thing. I am away to bathe in how pigheaded and wrong I wast it so many years Thanks All!

One of us. One of us.

It's a surprising thing when you first encounter the advantages.

Yay!

It helped me in that I was waiting for such a device since around age 11 when I first read Asimov's Foundation Trilogy (at the time) and one of the characters was using some sort of e-reader and I wanted one for myself! Now millions of years later it has become a reality!

I just found a nice little feature:

If you have the Kindle iOS app installed, you can send articles to any other Kindle device from the iOS Share Sheet. It’s great for sending articles directly to your e-ink Kindle - something I used to do with Instapaper but they now charge for.