Random non sequitur posts catch-all thread

Mex wrote:
MeatMan wrote:

After the Aliens: Colonial Marines fiasco and Gearbox's involvement with it, I wonder if now some people will think of them as the "turd polisher" developer.

At least they know how to do Borderlands right ... for now. *fingers crossed*

What fiasco is that? I guess the game sucks?

Terribadly

Aww, that's too bad, I think there's never been a great game with the Aliens franchise (although the AvP arcade game was awesome)

Mex wrote:

Aww, that's too bad, I think there's never been a great game with the Aliens franchise (although the AvP arcade game was awesome)

I dunno, I enjoyed the Aliens 3 game for the SNES. But then, I was a kid at the time and my tastes in games were... lax, in comparison to my current standards.

Mex wrote:

Aww, that's too bad, I think there's never been a great game with the Aliens franchise (although the AvP arcade game was awesome)

There's been a couple:

Aliens on the 8 bit machines (Spectrum, Commodore 64 etc)
IMAGE(http://www.freewarebox.com/images/screenshot/lv-426_13805.png)

Alien Trilogy on the 32-bit machines (Playstation, Saturn etc)
IMAGE(http://www.satakore.com/satengine/screenshots/T-81/T-8113G_2,,Sega-Saturn-Screenshot-2-Alien-Trilogy-JPN.jpg)

but otherwise, yes.

I turned 30 today. That's weird. How did I get here so fast?

GWJ should have its own videogame by now, designed by Ken Levine & Warren Spector, maybe even a board game, including characters like the Pillow of Heterosexuality

muttonchop wrote:

I turned 30 today. That's weird. How did I get here so fast?

Probably took a left turn in Albuquerque

muttonchop wrote:

I turned 30 today. That's weird. How did I get here so fast?

Wormhole?

Happy birthday!

The good news is that rolling stone just picks up speed from there.

[Edit] Man, I'm an ass. Happy birthday!

muttonchop wrote:

I turned 30 today. That's weird. How did I get here so fast?

Wait until you're looking at your 45th. That'll throw you off.

Happy birthday.

I found this article on Lifehacker about how to work an on call job and keep your sanity. I was gonna tell my dad about it, as he's a locksmith and has to do on call stuff every so often. Turns out he's out on a couple calls right now. Oh, the irony.

muttonchop wrote:

I turned 30 today. That's weird. How did I get here so fast?

I'll be right there with you in 16 days...

Just got my tax return and it's taking every ounce of my willpower not to blow it on Rocksmith and this guy:

IMAGE(http://static.musiciansfriend.com/derivates/18/001/295/415/DV016_Jpg_Large_517885.832.063_ash_mp.jpg)

You should do it!

I sure hope you aren't looking to be convinced not to do this. I certainly think you should.

Radical Ans wrote:

Just got my tax return and it's taking every ounce of my willpower not to blow it on Rocksmith and this guy:

IMAGE(http://static.musiciansfriend.com/derivates/18/001/295/415/DV016_Jpg_Large_517885.832.063_ash_mp.jpg)

DO IT

My advice: if you don't already play guitar and know you love it, don't drop $500 on one, even if it's pretty. If you're just starting to learn, buy a cheaper guitar for Rocksmith. Down the line, if you find that you're really taken with playing guitar, consider a more expensive one, but don't drop a chunk of change now on a hobby you might enjoy in theory but not enjoy in practice.

ClockworkHouse wrote:

My advice: if you don't already play guitar and know you love it, don't drop $500 on one, even if it's pretty. If you're just starting to learn, buy a cheaper guitar for Rocksmith. Down the line, if you find that you're really taken with playing guitar, consider a more expensive one, but don't drop a chunk of change now on a hobby you might enjoy in theory but not enjoy in practice.

Devil's advocate:

Sadly, $500 is a cheap guitar, in the grand scheme of things. But that said, I'd recommend getting a $500 Made In Mexico Fender over getting a $200-300 Squire (or even a worse, a cheaper knock off) and feeling compelled to upgrade as soon as you start to really enjoy playing guitar. The quality jump is fairly significant, despite both being entry level guitars. Guitars don't lose value too significantly, you could sell it for a reasonable amount of the purchase price back if you needed to.

But your advice is still totally sound, which leads to a really weird catch 22, almost. If you try to limit the risk, you almost end up wasting that money if you get really into the hobby. But if you don't end up into it, you definitely wasted the money. I hate recommending guitar equipment to new guitarists because of this.

ClockworkHouse wrote:

My advice: if you don't already play guitar and know you love it, don't drop $500 on one, even if it's pretty. If you're just starting to learn, buy a cheaper guitar for Rocksmith. Down the line, if you find that you're really taken with playing guitar, consider a more expensive one, but don't drop a chunk of change now on a hobby you might enjoy in theory but not enjoy in practice.

No worries in that department. I played guitar/bass in bands all throwout my college years, so I know I love playing. I even used to have a starburst version of that same guitar and loved the crap out of it. I see Rocksmith as more of a way to get back into it after being away for a few years. Also my friend and I have been discussing maybe starting up a new band so it'd be good for me to have some gear.

Sadly, the hesitation comes from me knowing that I should probably be saving the cash rather than immediately spending it. I'm hoping to put some money down on a house in a year or so and buying guitars doesn't help. Stupid adulthood....

SixteenBlue wrote:
ClockworkHouse wrote:

My advice: if you don't already play guitar and know you love it, don't drop $500 on one, even if it's pretty. If you're just starting to learn, buy a cheaper guitar for Rocksmith. Down the line, if you find that you're really taken with playing guitar, consider a more expensive one, but don't drop a chunk of change now on a hobby you might enjoy in theory but not enjoy in practice.

Devil's advocate:

Sadly, $500 is a cheap guitar, in the grand scheme of things. But that said, I'd recommend getting a $500 Made In Mexico Fender over getting a $200-300 Squire (or even a worse, a cheaper knock off) and feeling compelled to upgrade as soon as you start to really enjoy playing guitar. The quality jump is fairly significant, despite both being entry level guitars. Guitars don't lose value too significantly, you could sell it for a reasonable amount of the purchase price back if you needed to.

But your advice is still totally sound, which leads to a really weird catch 22, almost. If you try to limit the risk, you almost end up wasting that money if you get really into the hobby. But if you don't end up into it, you definitely wasted the money. I hate recommending guitar equipment to new guitarists because of this.

That's my thinking as well. I want a guitar, but I can't justify a $1k+ guitar. The $500 Fenders offer a good middle ground between a mediocre entry level Squire or Epiphone and the big leagues.

Good guitars are easier to re-sell if you discover you're not into playing guitars.

Cheap guitars are harder to re-sell, sometimes people don't even want them for free, because they're harder to play.

ClockworkHouse wrote:

My advice: if you don't already play guitar and know you love it, don't drop $500 on one, even if it's pretty. If you're just starting to learn, buy a cheaper guitar for Rocksmith. Down the line, if you find that you're really taken with playing guitar, consider a more expensive one, but don't drop a chunk of change now on a hobby you might enjoy in theory but not enjoy in practice.

Bingo. I say this as someone who's had the $300 Rock Band 3 Squier Stratocaster hanging on my wall for the last year and a bit. This week, I accepted that learning to play the guitar isn't actually appealing to me at all, took it down, and listed it for sale on Amazon.

I just want to point out that my location (Dunwall-Solstheim), which indicates the games I'm playing now, is also a very clever pun on the neighbourhood I live in, since no one would get the joke otherwise.

Radical Ans wrote:
ClockworkHouse wrote:

My advice: if you don't already play guitar and know you love it, don't drop $500 on one, even if it's pretty. If you're just starting to learn, buy a cheaper guitar for Rocksmith. Down the line, if you find that you're really taken with playing guitar, consider a more expensive one, but don't drop a chunk of change now on a hobby you might enjoy in theory but not enjoy in practice.

No worries in that department. I played guitar/bass in bands all throwout my college years, so I know I love playing. I even used to have a starburst version of that same guitar and loved the crap out of it. I see Rocksmith as more of a way to get back into it after being away for a few years. Also my friend and I have been discussing maybe starting up a new band so it'd be good for me to have some gear.

Sadly, the hesitation comes from me knowing that I should probably be saving the cash rather than immediately spending it. I'm hoping to put some money down on a house in a year or so and buying guitars doesn't help. Stupid adulthood....

Yeah, but if you become a rock star, you can buy many houses.

/voice of reason

Jonman wrote:

Bingo. I say this as someone who's had the $300 Rock Band 3 Squier Stratocaster hanging on my wall for the last year and a bit. This week, I accepted that learning to play the guitar isn't actually appealing to me at all, took it down, and listed it for sale on Amazon.

Not to derail too much, but what turned you off with the RB Squire/RB3 Pro mode? I have been on the fence since they announced RB3 and the Pro Guitar.

McIrishJihad wrote:
Jonman wrote:

Bingo. I say this as someone who's had the $300 Rock Band 3 Squier Stratocaster hanging on my wall for the last year and a bit. This week, I accepted that learning to play the guitar isn't actually appealing to me at all, took it down, and listed it for sale on Amazon.

Not to derail too much, but what turned you off with the RB Squire/RB3 Pro mode? I have been on the fence since they announced RB3 and the Pro Guitar.

Well, it wasn't so much what turned me off as what didn't turn me on. I was hoping that it would be the spark that would light the fire of learning to play the guitar, and it really, really wasn't.

Fact is, it was hard. A steep-as-sh*t learning curve. And to a certain extent, starting to learn any instrument has some of that, and I never got over that hump.

With some hindsight, I'm fairly convinced that the problem is as much mine as it Harmonix's. I've never played an instrument (short of an abortive set of piano lessons that were pushed on me as a 12-year old), and I'm starting to come to the conclusion that that's just not in my personality-DNA.

That said, RB3 didn't do a great job of easing the beginner into it. I've resisted trying Rocksmith (because after the disappointment of RB3, that felt like throwing good money after bad), which I hear is a much better tool for learning, because I think the reality is that 'practice' isn't something I have a natural penchant for.

EDIT - something else I've realized is that with the limited amount of 'alone-lesiure-time' I have as a married Gamer-With-A-Job, the banging my head against a brick wall that learning an instrument for the first time simply isn't appealing. My other interests, be they gaming or athletics, fulfill that levelling-up need that a lifetime of gaming has instilled. Sucking at something for a long period of time very quickly become discouraging. Again, my flaw rather than Harmonix's.

Jonman wrote:
McIrishJihad wrote:
Jonman wrote:

Bingo. I say this as someone who's had the $300 Rock Band 3 Squier Stratocaster hanging on my wall for the last year and a bit. This week, I accepted that learning to play the guitar isn't actually appealing to me at all, took it down, and listed it for sale on Amazon.

Not to derail too much, but what turned you off with the RB Squire/RB3 Pro mode? I have been on the fence since they announced RB3 and the Pro Guitar.

Well, it wasn't so much what turned me off as what didn't turn me on. I was hoping that it would be the spark that would light the fire of learning to play the guitar, and it really, really wasn't.

Fact is, it was hard. A steep-as-sh*t learning curve. And to a certain extent, starting to learn any instrument has some of that, and I never got over that hump.

With some hindsight, I'm fairly convinced that the problem is as much mine as it Harmonix's. I've never played an instrument (short of an abortive set of piano lessons that were pushed on me as a 12-year old), and I'm starting to come to the conclusion that that's just not in my personality-DNA.

That said, RB3 didn't do a great job of easing the beginner into it. I've resisted trying Rocksmith (because after the disappointment of RB3, that felt like throwing good money after bad), which I hear is a much better tool for learning, because I think the reality is that 'practice' isn't something I have a natural penchant for.

Cool - guess I'll just stick with Expert 5-button easy mode and Pro Drums then

McIrishJihad wrote:

Cool - guess I'll just stick with Expert 5-button easy mode and Pro Drums then :)

Yeah, exactly.

I was a fiend for Expert everything, including Pro Drums. My hope had been that that would translate to a real instrument, and it really, really didn't.

McIrishJihad wrote:

Not to derail too much

In this thread, I believe that is impossible.

MeatMan wrote:
McIrishJihad wrote:

Not to derail too much

In this thread, I believe that is impossible. :)

IMAGE(http://funnyasduck.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/tumblr_lyokyoggpW1r5ipleo1_500.jpg)

Exactly.