Fable 2 catch all

The evil/good appearance alone was worth checking out. How many people tried to be good only to massacre an entire town and buy every house and store? I did. And I'll do it again, too!

MWUAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!

Sidebar: I just checked out the Lionhead Fable 2 Vid Diary and Shepard Book is a voice actor for the game. Awesome!

Shepard Book is not a voice actor, it's a manual!

Well, I'm still getting the CE. It's only 40 quid and I always enjoy watching the making of documentaries.

Nothing will stop me being a female hero and getting myself knocked up.

Microsoft Games Studios wrote:

We apologize for any inconvenience.

Whenever I read this, it translates in my head to "Screw You! Mwahahahah!"

I'll pick up the PC version, with all the bugs fixed and expanded content. Like I did with the first one.

Say, has anyone said if you can uh, copulate, with your friends in multiplayer? 'Cause I'd totally be into that.

nsmike wrote:

Say, has anyone said if you can uh, copulate, with your friends in multiplayer? 'Cause I'd totally be into that.

I recall reading that Lionhead that multiplayer rumpo would be a bad thing. However, there's an achievement: The Swinger - 5 points if you "take part in a orgy, responsibly". Whether this means contraception, using vegetable oil instead of petroleum lubricant in a well-insulated house with a windmill on the top so it's a carbon neutral orgy, I don't know.

DudleySmith wrote:

using vegetable oil instead of petroleum lubricant in a well-insulated house with a windmill on the top so it's a carbon neutral orgy

You've made my day, sir.

And by the way: when is it coming out?

Went to a games convention today and this was playable. Unfortunately I didn't get any hands on time myself (I hate queues) but it's looking frikken sweet.

Release dates according to Wiki:

21st October - North America
23rd October - Australia
24th October - Europe

I've heard Australia has bumped it to the 24th because the number 3 looks a little like boobs.

I'm pro-Molyneux, but this is, hmm, interesting: Fable 2 review copies include a request to get a non-gamer to try it out before passing judgement:

http://weblogs.variety.com/the_cut_scene/2008/10/peter-moores-re.html

I wonder why this special pleading is required?

I have a favour to ask you -- we build this game not only to appeal to gamers like yourself, but to appeal to anybody. So please, please, please, please, pleae find somebody who doesn't play games, watch them play it and see how their world turns out, because I think it's only when you see those differences that the unique experiences comes through.

It seems really innovative, really forward-thinking, really daring... What? He's so confident in his game he wants someone who doesn't like games to try it!?

Maybe not. What that says to me is hardcore gamers are going to be disappointed and he wants them to get a casual gamer's input before they totally tear it down. He really is asking for a favor.

LobsterMobster wrote:

It seems really innovative, really forward-thinking, really daring... What? He's so confident in his game he wants someone who doesn't like games to try it!?

Maybe not. What that says to me is hardcore gamers are going to be disappointed and he wants them to get a casual gamer's input before they totally tear it down. He really is asking for a favor.

I hope you're wrong. I fear you're not.

Tancata wrote:

[...]

[...]because I think it's only when you see those differences that the unique experiences comes through.

So if I don't have a non-gamer to play the game for me, I'm not really going to get what the game has to offer? Well, that sucks.

MoonDragon wrote:
Tancata wrote:

[...]

[...]because I think it's only when you see those differences that the unique experiences comes through.

So if I don't have a non-gamer to play the game for me, I'm not really going to get what the game has to offer? Well, that sucks.

I don't think he's saying that the game will suck unless you have a non-gamer play it, I think he's saying that the game will act and react in ways hardcore gamers won't expect so if someone with no assumptions goes in they might end up doing surprising and refreshing things. So seeing the difference between how you play the game and how they play the game will add to your experience.

That's what I think he's saying, that is. Who knows if it's what he meant or if it's true.

LobsterMobster wrote:

Maybe not. What that says to me is hardcore gamers are going to be disappointed and he wants them to get a casual gamer's input before they totally tear it down. He really is asking for a favor.

As with the recent online co-op fumble, Molyneux's request makes me uneasy. But can the game really disappoint so much when the recent gameplay videos look so great, and when the hands-on features have been so positive?

(Possibly).

There was a recent article in Edge about the fact that the moral choices were not the sort that we are used to. There were two main facets of it mentioned in the article:

(a) More actions have an effect on the various alignment scores than we are used to, so it's not the usual "this is an action part, and this is a moral choice part" delineation, and that the game is constantly modifying your alignment indicators.

(b) Since the vast majority of people who played Fable 1 and other RPGs play "good" alignments, they have made it harder to do so. You, in effect, have to be willing to hurt yourself a lot of the time to choose the "good" path. In their testing they've tried to change things so that the alignments are more balanced in their testing population.

This kind of thing does make me excited about the game, though, just like everyone else, I've been hurt by Lionhead before.

I'm glad I didn't pre order this game. These Shenanigans make it so no one has any idea what state the game will release in. I was tempted to pre-order but then I remembered that I did that for Fable 1 and the game didn't have many of the features promised and some of the story was chopped off in order to ship on time. Then they release the untold stories edition for $40 cheaper than I paid for their abridged version. I'm also pretty sure that online coop was in the works for fable 1 too and it just never happened.

I'll wait for the eventual $20 full feature game.

nsmike wrote:
LobsterMobster wrote:

It seems really innovative, really forward-thinking, really daring... What? He's so confident in his game he wants someone who doesn't like games to try it!?

Maybe not. What that says to me is hardcore gamers are going to be disappointed and he wants them to get a casual gamer's input before they totally tear it down. He really is asking for a favor.

I hope you're wrong. I fear you're not.

If this game disappoints me as much as Spore did by targeting the casual market, i think I'm going to cry.

Dudley wrote:

This kind of thing does make me excited about the game, though, just like everyone else, I've been hurt by Lionhead before.

I'm a battered Lionhead spouse. I think I've bought every game they've made on day one since Black & White. I never learn.

I know you hit me so hard 'cause you love me, Peter. Let me get you a beer.

I'm torn: cancel... don't cancel... cancel... don't cancel... Argh

I dont like that a key feature needs to be patched back in. On the other hand, the DLC that comes with the LE still sounds fun, but as usual it probably doesnt impact gameplay in any significant way.

They say the inability to make a decision is one sign of depression. Crud. If I can't even make decisions about my hobby anymore, I must be in a world of hurt.

Gamefly :p

I'm pretty poor at the moment so Im considering the $9.99 first month offer from gamefly to play Fallout 3, Fable 2 and Saints Row 2.

Tancata wrote:

I'm pro-Molyneux, but this is, hmm, interesting: Fable 2 review copies include a request to get a non-gamer to try it out before passing judgement:

http://weblogs.variety.com/the_cut_scene/2008/10/peter-moores-re.html

I wonder why this special pleading is required?

I have a favour to ask you -- we build this game not only to appeal to gamers like yourself, but to appeal to anybody. So please, please, please, please, pleae find somebody who doesn't play games, watch them play it and see how their world turns out, because I think it's only when you see those differences that the unique experiences comes through.

You know, I kinda feel that should almost be standard reviewing practice. It's already a hugely useful tool for judging a game while in development (just ask Valve), why not use it for judging a released game? Seems to me it would give reviewers a much better feel of what works and what doesn't in a game.

Normally I would bash any developer who tells reviewers how to judge his game, but on the other hand 0kelvin has the point. Given how Molyneux designs his games it's pretty obvious that reviewers should also look at Fable from 'casual gamer' viewpoint.

I think it's pretty safe to say that including such a letter was a pretty stupid move.

Mr.Green wrote:

I think it's pretty safe to say that including such a letter was a pretty stupid move.

Yeah I agree. I don't want to say he totally alienated part of his market, but that is kind of what he did.

I don't care how a casual or non-gamer experiences the world of Fable. If I plop down anywhere between 49.99 and 69.99, my only concern is whether I will enjoy it.

Irongut wrote:

I don't care how a casual or non-gamer experiences the world of Fable. If I plop down anywhere between 49.99 and 69.99, my only concern is whether I will enjoy it.

If you don't you can give it to someone who doesn't play games, doesn't want it, and almost definitely doesn't own an X360.

0kelvin wrote:

You know, I kinda feel that should almost be standard reviewing practice. It's already a hugely useful tool for judging a game while in development (just ask Valve), why not use it for judging a released game? Seems to me it would give reviewers a much better feel of what works and what doesn't in a game.

Good point. It may be that games journalists often get bogged down in how a game fits their own expectations, or the minutiae of comparisons to other games in the same genre, while missing the big picture.

I guess I was thinking of the ideal reviewer (they do exist...) - the expert who draws on deep knowledge and appreciation to say something insightful about the game - like you'd expect a music or film critic to do. That kind of reviewer is in a much better position to comment on the game than a non-gamer, just as you'd probably ignore a seven-year-old's opinion on the latest blockbuster movie.