aBit has left the motherboard market

I for one thinks this sucks. In the past they did not make great motherboards but they seemed to have rebounded with one of the best motherboards on the market (the IP35 pro).

Turns out that they are ending motherboards production at the end of 2008 and will honor rebates for the next 3 years.

This sucks. I don't think my recently bought and awesome ip35 pro with kick the bucket any time soon but if it does in 2009 I guess I will need to buy a new one.

http://channel.hexus.net/content/item.php?item=15225

Man, abit has just been going further and further down lately. What else are they going to do though? The only products left that they make are video cards and I can't remember the last time I saw one of those on sale or features in any articles.

EDIT: Looks like they're going to focus more on "consumer electronics devices." I guess we'll see.

So long, good competitor.
Always vying for a ratio spot, they made some good boards.
With this and Asus's spottiness, I guess I need to move further down the alphabetical list for the first time in awhile.

boogle wrote:

So long, good competitor.
Always vying for a ratio spot, they made some good boards.
With this and Asus's spottiness, I guess I need to move further down the alphabetical list for the first time in awhile.

This is the sad part. Asus has been spotty and aBit has been shining with it's nee mobo's. Kinda sucks. I guess my next mobo will be EVGA if Asus doesn't shape up. Those EVGA boards are so much $$$ though

MSI boards are very good as well. I've used them for years and love em'.

TempestBlayze wrote:
boogle wrote:

So long, good competitor.
Always vying for a ratio spot, they made some good boards.
With this and Asus's spottiness, I guess I need to move further down the alphabetical list for the first time in awhile.

This is the sad part. Asus has been spotty and aBit has been shining with it's nee mobo's. Kinda sucks. I guess my next mobo will be EVGA if Asus doesn't shape up. Those EVGA boards are so much $$$ though

/concur

TempestBlayze wrote:

Those EVGA boards are so much $$$ though

Then I can't say this name enough: Gigabyte, Gigabyte, Gigabyte.

That sucks I love my ip35pro. Gigabyte does make a good board too. I was kinda dissapointed in my Asus it wasn't bad it just wasn't good. (had to replace some fans.)

I guess I'll be looking for EVGA to step it up and fill the gap for me also.

I feel bad for recomending the IP35pro in that other thread now though.

Tyan makes really excellent boards, too.

And, yes, Secret Asian Man, your failure to predict the future will go on your permanent record.

I never tried their motherboards. People keep saying Asus is unreliable, but so far I've had nothing but good experiences, so I'm sticking with them for the time being.

The problem with Asus is they're very unpredictable. Some of their models are as they said "Rock Solid. Heart Touching." while others are more "Crap Spewing. Heart Burning." Their driver support is also poor, their FTP sites often time out or are slow as molasses and their support forums usually consist of people saying "Ur doin it rong!" when you ask for help.

Stylez and I also ran into a problem about 2 years ago where an Asus video card based on a NVIDIA chip was causing a system to constantly freeze if any driver but the outdated Asus ones were used, including the NVIDIA reference drivers. It took us days to figure this out because there was no mention of the problem anywhere, Asus support couldn't figure it out and we kept saying "There's no damn way something this stupid could be the problem." I personally swore off Asus after that.

Make no mistake, you can still do a lot worse than Asus (AOpen for example) but I personally recommend either MSI or eVGA. Lots of people do still have good luck with Asus though (our restaurant POS guy swears by them still) and their continuing popularity is hard to deny.

I stopped trusting ASUS when they started lying to me about the specs on their boards. This motherboard flat does not have what I was told it has; they made claims like 2 x16 slots, when it has two PHYSICAL x16 slots, but one of them is only x4. There were a couple of other obvious marketing spin bullsh*t claims; true only for useless definitions of true.

And, as Parallax says, their driver support isn't very good, and their website is consistently the worst I'm forced to use on a semi-regular basis. It's glacially slow and breaks constantly. The design itself is reasonably good, but it's obvious ASUS doesn't want to spend any money on actually getting enough bandwidth or proper servers to handle the load. Actually being able to download a driver from their website when you want it is unlikely; I'd guess that I'm unable to download close to 70% of the time.

I always found is rather ironic that the world's most popular mainboard maker and a fairly decent player in the actual server system market would have trouble having enough good servers.

First VIA getting out of chipsets, now ABIT getting out of motherboards...

My ABIT AV8 is now officially a dinosaur.... a collectible!

If AMD gets out of cpus, the circle will then be complete as my AV8 has been chugging along to the tune of my FX-53 for years.

The day VIA got out of chipsets, a collective yell of excitement from techs who've had to deal with them was heard 'round the world!

Parallax Abstraction wrote:

Make no mistake, you can still do a lot worse than Asus (AOpen for example) but I personally recommend either MSI or eVGA. Lots of people do still have good luck with Asus though (our restaurant POS guy swears by them still) and their continuing popularity is hard to deny.

Yeah, I have heard some bad stories, and their website is a mess, no doubt about it. I guess I always choose the right boards.

Also, eVGA boards are good? I'm pretty brand loyal to them when it comes to their video cards due to past experiences, but everyone's been telling me how Nvidia's chipsets are garbage compared to Intel's, and I just assumed that's what they would be following.

As far as I know, NVidia STILL hasn't fixed the bugs with their IDE and network drivers, and it's been years, and at least three new generations of motherboards.

I recently built a quad core monster video editing rig for a long-time client using an eVGA 780i board and it's been awesome. The tweaking capabilities offered in the BIOS of this board are simply mind blowing and it's great to only have one driver to install to get every mainboard function. NVIDIA has been having problems lately with chipsets that were clearly pushed out too early with some pretty glaring flaws. The 790i chipset has been linked to some random hard disk corruption problems and several mainboard makers like Asus and Gigabyte are so ticked off about it that they're not going to sell NVIDIA based boards anymore. I believe a previous chipset of theirs has this problem too and it required BIOS updates to fix. They also recently said they're going to allow Intel to use SLI technology in their future chipsets which is leading some to believe they're planning to dump chipsets after this blemish. That would be a shame as I think more competition is good but I think they've kind of dug their own grave.

Many of the recent Intel chipsets are awesome and if you're not looking for SLI or ridiculous memory performance (which is what my video guy needed), they're still a very good choice.

I have been quite happy with my ASRock 4Core1600Twins-P35. Under $100. Lots of features (crossfire, eSATA, 7.1) and has been very stable overclocking my Quad 2.4 to 3.0ghz. Abit boards were always good boards but tended to be pricey. I've generally had good luck with MSI boards and recently ASRock boards.

This news is a bummer - my last 2 builds (5 years ago) used Abit boards. I started researching for my new build and was all set on the Abit IP35Pro. Based on this news I'm having second thoughts - leaning toward the GIGABYTE GA-EP35-DS3L. But I can't shake the feeling that I'll be missing out on some great features of the Abit board.

I CAN still get the IP35Pro. I wonder if it makes sense to still go that route? I guess Abit will continue to support boards going forward to some extent.

Any advice?

I love the IP35 board. I would say get it IF you plan on overclocking. It is definitely the most stable board out there for OC'ing.

EvilHomer3k wrote:

ASRock 4Core1600Twins-P35

Man, that's one of the most horrendous model numbers I've ever seen. ASRock boards are very hard to get around here but I've heard pretty good things about them. They were originally an Asus sub-brand but I think they do their own design and manufacturing now.

It's really a shame that aBit had gone the crooked accounting route a few years ago as they had a good thing going but were pretty much ruined by greedy management.

I love my asus board. I've had two now. Maybe it's just my luck (AMD is solid gold for me, and I've had nothing but trouble with Intel, Nvidia has always worked flawlessly, while ATI has given me some trouble.

I probably build between 10-30 systems a year and have used Asus predominately over the last 5 years with nothing but great results.. naturally I've gotten some duds during that time period but nothing like the pain and suffering I've had with EVGA.. the last two EVGA boards I had (a 680i, and a 790i) were brutal.. so much so that I had to go back to my in between board an Asus 780i.. The EVGA 680i I used for about 8 months and it was really bad.

Right now I'm on an Asus X48 based board with 2 4870's in Crossfire and its been absolutely perfect.

On a completely unrelated note.. mobo prices are nutso these days.. I fondly remember the days that a top end Asus or Abit would run $120 max.. nowadays I find myself dropping $300 on a motherboard.

Yep, usually full of features you'll never use too. A lot of mainboard makers are just adding tons of extra crap so they can say they have it when their competitors don't.

It's been ages since I've had an Abit board, but that's still sad news. I still remember the days when men were men, and when I, like every self-respecting Linux geek, had an Abit BP6 and two overclocked Celerons. I had 512MB of RAM and a Matrox G400 in mine and it was a beast -- I still remember playing Quake 3 while compiling a kernel in the background because, well, why the hell not?

Ahhh... those were the days

pneuman wrote:

It's been ages since I've had an Abit board, but that's still sad news. I still remember the days when men were men, and when I, like every self-respecting Linux geek, had an Abit BP6 and two overclocked Celerons. I had 512MB of RAM and a Matrox G400 in mine and it was a beast -- I still remember playing Quake 3 while compiling a kernel in the background because, well, why the hell not?

Ahhh... those were the days :)

I have a BP6 still running at home with two p3 750's! It now ha 2 gigs of memory and about a terabyte of left over HDD's all enclosed in a Lian Li PC30 case. SERVATRON RULES!!!! The longest it has been up continuously was 364 days (then the power went out). It houses all my MP3's, does random game hosting for me, FTP http etc. and anything else I need.

Pharacon wrote:
pneuman wrote:

It's been ages since I've had an Abit board, but that's still sad news. I still remember the days when men were men, and when I, like every self-respecting Linux geek, had an Abit BP6 and two overclocked Celerons. I had 512MB of RAM and a Matrox G400 in mine and it was a beast -- I still remember playing Quake 3 while compiling a kernel in the background because, well, why the hell not?

Ahhh... those were the days :)

I have a BP6 still running at home with two p3 750's! It now ha 2 gigs of memory and about a terabyte of left over HDD's all enclosed in a Lian Li PC30 case. SERVATRON RULES!!!! The longest it has been up continuously was 364 days (then the power went out). It houses all my MP3's, does random game hosting for me, FTP http etc. and anything else I need.

Nice I ended up selling my old BP6 setup, but not until I could get a Tbird Athlon with a decent DDR motherboard, which was nearly four years later -- the longest gap I've ever had in PC upgrades. It didn't make sense to upgrade to any earlier single CPU system, since any less of a system would've been slower than the BP6 at a lot of tasks.