Car lovers?

The shoe analogy is fantastic, ElectriPi!

If I ever buy another car, then I will keep that in mind and force myself to overcome my stage-fright.

I sat in and fiddled with a few 911 (991 models), so I'm comfortable with everything... apart from the actual using it on the move!

Lesson learned.

Yes, if you can at least try to drive it before you take it home from the dealer. Mechanical stuff is table stakes, what you want to know is do you LIKE driving it. How is the ride, the comfort, steering, visibility, noise etc, like Pi said. Doubly important as you had another similar car from the same maker and did not like how it drove! Good luck, it is a gorgeous car and I am envious and hope you love it.

Anyone recommend radar detectors?

Just started a new job where my commute is a lot longer and is 70% highway.

detroit20 wrote:
LeapingGnome wrote:

Was the steering in the 911 heavier / less twitchy than the Cayman?

Er...

Embarrassingly. I don't know. Because I didn't actually drive the car. I'll report back next week after I pick it up.

Truth be told, I've only ever test driven a car once (I've owned 5 cars previously). That was the Cayman 18 months ago.

This partly because I find the prospect of test drives a bit stressful. I kind of get stage fright. I'm so worried about the driving bit, that I can't focus on the testing part.

And it's also partly because I'm not sure that I know what I'm meant to be testing. Should I be checking that all the buttons and switches work? Should I be checking that the ride is alright? Can I tell if something's wrong with a car or is it "They all do that, Sir!"?

Linked to that is the fact that test drives - certainly, for second hand cars - are pretty short, and I don't feel that I have to the time to carry out the really important test: can I actually live with this car for the next 3 years? Does it complement my lifestyle or are there some compromises that are deal-breakers?

I am genuinely embarrassed by this.

I bought my 2016 S4 never haven driven or seen in person this particular car

(I did drive a 2015 with almost all the same options, minus the adaptive suspension. And I had the car inspected before it was shipped to me.)

LeapingGnome wrote:

Was the steering in the 911 heavier / less twitchy than the Cayman?

So, now I can report back.

Yes, the steering is a lot less twitchy, but - being electric rather than hydraulic - it is also lighter. Twirl-the-wheel-with-one-finger lighter, in fact. I need to do a few of more drives to work out whether it has less 'feel'... which is what a lot of people said when Porsche made this change a few years ago.

But I can already see that it's going to be easier to live with.

The back seat provide more luggage space than the Cayman's deep rear shelf.
Climate control is light years better than basic A/C.
The Bose stereo knocks spots of the base CDR24 I had previously (with only two speakers!!)
And I have built-in sat nav again.

I also like the little touches. Like the original owner's decision to spec leather on the doors and dashboard. It really lifts the interior.

The thing I really love is the PDK gearbox. I am NEVER going back to manual. In fact, the automatic mode is so good that I can't see myself ever using the shift buttons. The only problem I have with it is the 'kickdown' function, which I'm still not entirely familiar with. It is might embarrassing to be pootling around town at 25mph, and to accidentally kick down to 1st gear and 6,000 revs... and a lot of noise.

But otherwise, this one's a keeper...

I, too, feel like I'm the one being judged during test drives. I still do it, of course.

Fedaykin98 wrote:

I, too, feel like I'm the one being judged during test drives. I still do it, of course.

Thanks, Fedaykin98. I'm glad more of us are emerging from the shadows.

But I can go one better/worse:

The dealership have a little presentation room where they introduce owners to their new (to them) cars. It's in their warehouse. There's a short, sharp left turn out of the presentation room and out through the main warehouse doors.

I ask Chris, the salesmen, to take the car out for me... I was afraid that I wouldn't be able to take the car out myself in one manoeuvre, and that I end up making trying to make a 7-point turn with an unfamiliar gearbox. It gave me the sweats.

Some dealerships allow 24 hour test drives, so thats also something to think about.

I'd be worried about falling asleep behind the wheel after driving for 24 hours.

The latest episode of The Grand Tour was pretty good, best one in recent memory. If you haven't watched it this season, most of the episodes are like their 'travel specials' where they spend the hour or more in one place doing challenges and such. Those have always been their best ones anyway.

LeapingGnome wrote:

The latest episode of The Grand Tour was pretty good, best one in recent memory. If you haven't watched it this season, most of the episodes are like their 'travel specials' where they spend the hour or more in one place doing challenges and such. Those have always been their best ones anyway.

This season been a joy to watch.

detroit20 wrote:
LeapingGnome wrote:

Was the steering in the 911 heavier / less twitchy than the Cayman?

So, now I can report back.

Yes, the steering is a lot less twitchy, but - being electric rather than hydraulic - it is also lighter. Twirl-the-wheel-with-one-finger lighter, in fact. I need to do a few of more drives to work out whether it has less 'feel'... which is what a lot of people said when Porsche made this change a few years ago.

But I can already see that it's going to be easier to live with.

The back seat provide more luggage space than the Cayman's deep rear shelf.
Climate control is light years better than basic A/C.
The Bose stereo knocks spots of the base CDR24 I had previously (with only two speakers!!)
And I have built-in sat nav again.

I also like the little touches. Like the original owner's decision to spec leather on the doors and dashboard. It really lifts the interior.

The thing I really love is the PDK gearbox. I am NEVER going back to manual. In fact, the automatic mode is so good that I can't see myself ever using the shift buttons. The only problem I have with it is the 'kickdown' function, which I'm still not entirely familiar with. It is might embarrassing to be pootling around town at 25mph, and to accidentally kick down to 1st gear and 6,000 revs... and a lot of noise.

But otherwise, this one's a keeper...

Detroit20! Awesome snag man! I'm like your mirror image counterpart. In October of 2017 I had saved and succeeded professionally where I was ready to buy a base 991.2 911, and after test driving one, did not fall in love. But then I drove the 718 Cayman S. (982) Wow! It has a lot of things from previous 911s but felt so visceral! I got mine with PDK, and Sport Crono. So I totally embrace the A.I. when it comes to shifting.....nothing quite like it. Also the Bose sound system is great in those few times I listen to music rather than the typical podcasts.

If you have the ability, I would go with Ceramic Coating. I did it a year ago, and it has been great since! Always looks freshly waxed, and if I need to wash it, I just drive it in the rain.

Cheers Mate!

Thanks, Hassasain!

I remember you posting about your new 718 at the back end of 2017. It looked fantastic in what looked like Guards Red.

I didn't test the 718 (see earlier posts ), but everything I read says that it is Porsche's best drivers' car. In particular, the electric steering is meant to be a big step on from the version in its predecessor, the 981. And there's a boatload more low range torque from the new engine. The motoring journalism consensus is that the only daily driver that comes close is the new Alpine A110.

At one stage, I thought I was going to buy a black car, so I thought about getting a ceramic coating. But they're about £900, and I don't really drive often enough or far enough to justify it. Also, I wasn't sure whether using a commercial hand car wash would result in the coating being removed. Most of the reviews I've read have been by people who wash their cars themselves (using the two-bucket method). But I'l reconsider in the light of your positive feedback.

Also, I'm considering doing a Precision driving course at the Porsche Experience Centre at Silverstone. That would cost about the same, and might be a better investment as I'd be using my car for that.

We have a 2008 Nissan Pathfinder which we love. Today, while taking the youngest to school , I noticed the smell of antifreeze. Not good. I dropped him off, and began driving the 5 blocks home. On the way I noticed that the temp was pegged all the way up. Not good. Not good at all. I was two blocks from home so I drove home and shut it off. I had taken him to work with me about an hour earlier and the drive from work is 3 miles.

After letting it cool I started it. Popped right off and I shut it off. Good. I thought. Probably just a blown hose or heater. I open the radiator to find what looks like pink yogurt in the radiator. WTF? A bit of research later and checking the transmission fluid I know I have what is commonly called the Strawberry Milkshake of Death (SMOD). Basically, the transmission fluid mixes with the radiator fluid due to a design flaw in the radiator causing excessive and very fast wear to the transmission. Cost to fully replace is anywhere from 4,000-8,000.

So now we have to decide if we spend 500-1000 to try to replace the radiator and flush the transmission and coolant a few times on the chance that the transmission isn't blown or get rid of it (replacing the transmission is more than it's worth at this point). We had some slightly more abnormal shifting issues before this but nothing major. No loss of power, nothing really out of the ordinary (it's always made strange noises while shifting but there seemed to be slightly noisier).

I've been looking at complaints all day and there have been a couple that did the radiator and flushed fluids and didn't have to replace the transmission. There were more who did it and then had issues later. I'm not sure it's worth trying at this point. We do really like the vehicle but hate spending the money on a lottery ticket. I also think it's been like this a while since it's pretty thick (it literally looks like a milkshake). Ugh. Now I'm wishing it was a blown head gasket.

Engineering Explained does Ceramic Coatings:

Thanks, mrtomaytohead

That was very informative.

I was about to post the "Shut Up And Take My Money!" gif, until i heard that a normal weekly wash is still recommended, plus a "ceramic boost' spray every 4-6 washes.

So, £950 pounds for the coating. And I still have to wash the car. And I also have to spray it regularly with a product that appears to cost $30.00 a bottle.

Nope. Ah'm oot!

The pricing variability has me really weary of ceramic coatings. The DIY stuff ranges from $4.99 to $100 and the professional installations can be hundreds.

I have the 3M protective film on one of my cars. I've managed to pick up a few light scratches looking just like his example. I had no idea a heat gun could remove them. I shall have to try that when I get chance!

detroit20 wrote:

So, £950 pounds for the coating. And I still have to wash the car. And I also have to spray it regularly with a product that appears to cost $30.00 a bottle.

Nope. Ah'm oot!

Did you truly think you'd never have to wash the car again? I just don't get how it's assumed to be magic.

And while I haven't watched the video, you don't have to use the maintenance sprays.

I've got a DIY kit of Carpro CQ UK that I bought for well under $100 that I'll put on some point soon when I've got the time to do the prep. I just expect it to give me a nice base coat of protection that will last for a couple of years.

The price you're really paying for pro-installation is all about the prep, not the product itself. For a paint correction to get the car ready, you're talking hours of work.

MannishBoy wrote:
detroit20 wrote:

So, £950 pounds for the coating. And I still have to wash the car. And I also have to spray it regularly with a product that appears to cost $30.00 a bottle.

Nope. Ah'm oot!

Did you truly think you'd never have to wash the car again? I just don't get how it's assumed to be magic.

And while I haven't watched the video, you don't have to use the maintenance sprays.

I've got a DIY kit of Carpro CQ UK that I bought for well under $100 that I'll put on some point soon when I've got the time to do the prep. I just expect it to give me a nice base coat of protection that will last for a couple of years.

The price you're really paying for pro-installation is all about the prep, not the product itself. For a paint correction to get the car ready, you're talking hours of work.

So seeing the last few comments after I made the Ceramic Pro recommendation, I feel like I should give my input. I had my car professional corrected and coated in October of 2018. The prep and color correction ran me 290.00 USD. After that I had two layers of Ceramic Pro placed for 690.00 USD, which also included the wheels and the windows/mirrors. The individual who did the service was certified in California, and because of this I have a 5 year warranty on the coating. So for at least five years I do not have to wax my car....and after six months I can tell you that when I do drive my car in the rain, it still beads up like it was freshly waxed. Dirt, Debris, bugs, and bird-droppings just solidify, and for the most part I can just wipe it off with a damp microfiber cloth. I did buy a specialty bottle of ceramic-approved cleaner, but I've only used it twice. Three other times I've used a touchless car wash, and really in my opinion if you just use a neutral pH car cleaner, you should be fine, (Just make sure you used good water, and exact measurements so the dilution is not thrown off.)

I don't wash the car often, and the real reason is because if it rains during the week, I'll periodically drive my car in the rain for about 20 minutes, and that does a pretty good job of cleaning the car. Ceramic pro is more costly then the DIY, but if you feel your car is something you want to keep for a long time, I'd go professional. I also plan on doing the yearly touch-ups , and the real reason is so that my coating will last for a very long time.

Hassasain wrote:

Ceramic pro is more costly then the DIY, but if you feel your car is something you want to keep for a long time, I'd go professional. I also plan on doing the yearly touch-ups , and the real reason is so that my coating will last for a very long time.

Depends on your background, interest, equipment, and general enjoyment of working on your cars. Actual ceramic installation is not rocket science. It's all about having the car prepped properly. Some of the more expensive coatings may last longer, but they go on about the same from the research I've done.

My family owned a dealership when I was growing up. My first job was detailing new and used cars in middle school. I've probably washed thousands of cars, and buffed hundreds. I think I'm capable of wiping a coating onto paint sections, allowing it to flash, then wiping it off /leveling it out. And while I don't have the latest, greatest long throw Rupes DA polisher from Italy, I've got a serviceable enough setup to handle my car's well maintained paint.

Nothing wrong with paying somebody, but it's also not true that it's a bad choice to DIY this type of stuff if you're comfortable with the process. My 15 year old 350Z's paint still looks great other than inevitable rock chips. Nobody has even washed it since I bought it new besides me. I expect my S4 will hold up at least as well, especially with the improvements that have been made in paints, tools, and car care products.

MannishBoy wrote:

Did you truly think you'd never have to wash the car again? I just don't get how it's assumed to be magic.

No, but I was expecting to have to do less work to keep the car clean. Perhaps a simple hose-down-and-dry.

But the video posted was clear that - in order to get the best from the ceramic coating - I'd have to do more than normal.

So basically the thick end of a grand, in order to do more work than previously.

I agree, I had Opticoat Pro put on one of my cars a few years ago (another ceramic coating) and it looks awesome when clean but it had to be kept up more than just a regular car. I didn't get it installed again it just wasn't worth it to me and I like things low maintenance.

I still don't see how it is more maintenance. More than what? More than periodic polishing and resealing with more normal products? Because that would have to be done to maintain the same protection of the base layers of paint. Or, you could just leave the paint alone and get the normal slow levels of oxidation and microscratching that occur with typical hand and machine washes.

And the periodic "maintenance" sprays aren't really required any more than "drying" sprays are on non-ceramic coated cars. Some people like them for shine and maybe a bit of extra beading.

It's all about what you want I guess.

All that said, I personally wouldn't pay hundreds of dollars for this, as I said, I'm more DIY in my vehicle maintenance. And a bit cheap. I'd spend the money instead on PPF for the high risk areas (front end, mirrors, etc). Then DIY a coating myself.

Or, you could just leave the paint alone and get the normal slow levels of oxidation and microscratching that occur with typical hand and machine washes

Ding ding, that is what I do. At least I don't go through car washes that have brushes!

Ditto. I leave my paint alone too. Now.

Ten years ago, when I bought my TT, I got an Autoglym kit thrown in with car. For the first 6 month, I Autoglym'ed the car once a month. But then I began to resent spending two hours doing this on my precious weekend, when I knew that a commercial hand car-wash would complete this in 15 minutes. So that's what Id do now.

Don't get me wrong. I do wince a little when they use their old rags to wipe and dry my car, rather than the use two-bucket method. But I'd rather do other things with my time.

I think PPF might be a good compromise. I'll see who's around me locally.

Or you can have the 3M paint protection film applied and then pressure wash. Like I do.

Moggy wrote:

Or you can have the 3M paint protection film applied and then pressure wash. Like I do.

A great option, if more pricey. I haven't done it on my current car, but did on the 350Z when it was new. The PPFs are much better now, and the protection against chips is real, vs ceramic, which isn't that kind of protection.

Doing a whole car is out of my budget, but I'm still considering it for the front of my car. If I did that, I'd still want something on the rest of the car to protect the rest of the paint. Either ceramic, or some other polymer type sealant.

Oh hey, I didn't know this was here. Hello, all.

I've considered a ceramic coating or a film, or perhaps just vinyl wrapping my car in a fancy new color every couple of years...

This is what I'm driving today:
IMAGE(https://i.ibb.co/mJcM1nL/the-answer.jpg)

Came from a 2014 WRX STi hatchback that got totaled by a drunk driver (not me) on the way home from work one night. Couldn't replace that since they stopped making the hatch in 2015, so I purchased a 2015 Mustang GT. That car bored me to tears and lead me to the Miata. No performance mods yet, but I'll get there.

edit: Those are my winter wheels/tires, just fyi.

Speaking of chips on cars. My current Impreza wagon has no significant noticeable damage to the hood, but multiple spots on the front of the roof. Has anyone else seen that previously? Also, is there an effective patch on spots that have long since began rusting? Any tutorials? I'm not looking to do tons as this is a 2006 and I just would like to not see rust, but am not super motivated (obviously since I've let it get like this).