Is Dune the only book in the series worth reading?

Shadout wrote:

I consider the new books (of which I have "only" read the first 8, of... I dont know, 14??) to be a literary crime against humanity.
The more of a fan you are of the originals, the less you should read the new ones They dont exactly ruin the original books, but they sure made a valiant effort.

Of the originals, my favorites are 1st and 6th. But they are all pretty good imo, and the second book is important for the first; the 6 books are essentially 2 trilogies.

Really? I think I'd recommend people read a summary than the actual prequel books but I don't consider them a crime. I may have been just way too happy to have more Dune tho. I really wanted to know what happened after Chapterhouse.

Shadout wrote:

Speaking of Dune, can't wait to see how the new movie is. Hard to believe it wont be catastrophic.

I'm going in with low expectations for sure.

I have only read the original 6. Once each except the first one I have read a few times. I'm fine with that.

Cautiously optimistic for the movie.

Finished The Machine Crusade and liked it. The Watchmen blue man moment was fun but didn't go far enough with the character considering what they did. I liked the character though.

The death of the dragon didn't make much sense to me. I love a epic misunderstanding but it knew who was onboard and what they were able to do. The death was just kind of dumb.

I really liked the different takes on what can be done in war. If someone makes scientific breakthrough can the government take it without compensating the person. If the only way to make ships is with slaves does that make slavery okay. Without the ships the war is lost. Should the slaves revolt and kill their masters even if it ends up causing the machines to win. Is killing off worlds and blaming it on machines okay if it means the humans can continue the war. Is it okay to lie to people so they will continue the war instead of seeking peace with the machine. Reminds me of DS9.

Loved the high levels of hypocrisy going on. Humans are violent and destructive but the machines are randomly killing people. Humans are calling the machines monsters for having slaves yet they have slaves. It is kind of weird how Omnius considers machines with human brains robots. They share the same bad traits as regular humans.

Really like the after notes section. I didn't know Hubert's son found the notes and outline from un published book and was using some details from that.

pandasuit wrote:
Shadout wrote:

I consider the new books (of which I have "only" read the first 8, of... I dont know, 14??) to be a literary crime against humanity.
The more of a fan you are of the originals, the less you should read the new ones They dont exactly ruin the original books, but they sure made a valiant effort.

Of the originals, my favorites are 1st and 6th. But they are all pretty good imo, and the second book is important for the first; the 6 books are essentially 2 trilogies.

Really? I think I'd recommend people read a summary than the actual prequel books but I don't consider them a crime. I may have been just way too happy to have more Dune tho. I really wanted to know what happened after Chapterhouse.

Brian Herbert made a career out of repeatedly robbing his father's grave. Neither he nor his partner can hold a candle to Frank Herbert's creativity and writing and their efforts only cheapen the universe Frank created.

I, too, desperately wanted more Dune. But each prequel book read like a simplistic "made for the WB" adaption of Frank's ideas and visions rather than a continuation of them.

I mean I've read a lot of Frank Herbert's non-Dune works and the man clearly knew how to create and write compelling stories. Brian, on the other hand, doesn't. And I dare say it's exceedingly likely he'd have never even had his earlier works published if it wasn't for his last name.

Finish The Battle of Corrin and thought it was middling. The start and middle were okay. The ending was a little forced. He was trying to hard to fit things in there boxes. The difference in time between the events here and the first dune are so great it doesn't really make much sense to put down the seeds so hard.

Completed Dune Messiah and thought it was odd. Not bad or good just odd. The entire book is a build up to a planned assassination mixed in with the making of a messiah. There are some Kingpin type moves in this book then for some reason the characters turn into dumb dumbs. I know love makes you do dumb things but come on. This is like my wife turned into a zombie so I'm going to keep her locked up in the closet and feed her people levels of dumb. Hmmm Kingpin would probably do that for his wife. okay maybe it is all good.

I didn't get it when I was younger, but it was a pretty good look at what an empire is like when the charismatic rebel leader takes control from the evil emperor and cannot control what he started to do so.

Completed Children of Dune and thought it was okay. The title is correct its all about the children but don't call them children because that would be a mistake. A general problem is that the characters are very lifeless. A big character's death was more of a afterthought. There was no weight behind it when it should have sent shock waves through the kingdom. Then in one scene we have two characters talking and one is debating if he will kill the other. There was no tension just words exchanged.

Still it wasn't bad. The chess moves were interesting. The setup for worm god boy was interesting. Game of Thrones this is not where you get deep into the character's head S happens. This is more lets put our tigers next to their king and see what happens. Granted it is hard to get inside the mind of someone that has a thousand minds in their head. I think the most emotional scene in the book is when the sister was talking about killing the guy they wanted her to merry. There is a interesting mind jack that happens that they didn't go far enough with so it fell flat on the pavement.

Just finished Dune and Dune Messiah and starting on Children of Dune.

Dune wrote:

Paul: Hey, native girl, destiny says we have to fall in love so we're in love now, cool?

Chani: I love you or whatever.

Dune Messiah wrote:

Paul: I promise that our child will sit on the throne.

Chani: Actually you should probably have babies with the princess.

Paul: I'm going to ignore that.

*Chani dies in childbirth*

Paul: It was the only way, because destiny said so.

I am continually troubled by the character of Chani. Jessica's motivation boiled down to "I gotta do it for my man," and then, "I gotta do it for my son," but at least we got enough of her perspective that it felt believable enough, if not exactly progressive.

Chani is such a non-entity, I don't understand what I'm supposed to care about here. Did she actually care about giving birth to Paul's heir? Paul certainly acts like she does, but we don't get enough of her perspective to know. It could just as easily be projection on Paul's part because it's so important to him.

It's also hard to get invested in Paul's world-weariness about jihads that happen entirely offscreen. We're to understand that he's the titular head of a destructive cultural juggernaut that he can barely control, but we never see it. I guess he's caused an order of magnitude more death than Hitler? On some other planets somewhere that are barely mentioned and never seen? Okay?

I dunno, man. I keep going through these and I'm not sure I entirely know why.

hbi2k wrote:

It's also hard to get invested in Paul's world-weariness about jihads that happen entirely offscreen. We're to understand that he's the titular head of a destructive cultural juggernaut that he can barely control, but we never see it. I guess he's caused an order of magnitude more death than Hitler? On some other planets somewhere that are barely mentioned and never seen? Okay?

I dunno, man. I keep going through these and I'm not sure I entirely know why.

I mean, that's kind of one of Herbert's main themes, that empire ends up evil even with the best possible intentions (survival of the human race). To be fair, he doesn't really dig into that until well into God Emperor (which is a dry-ass read), but the seeds are being planted.

It's also hard to empathize with an omniscient character, but that's the source of the world-weariiness - that Paul knows that there's is no path through the future that doesn't result in death and destruction, and he's trying to navigate the least bad path.

Canonically:

Dune Wikia wrote:

The Jihad ended in 10206 AG. According to Muad'Dib, conservative estimates put the Jihad's casualties at 61 billion lives, the sterilization of ninety planets, and the "demoralization" of five hundred additional worlds. Furthermore, 40 different religions were wiped out, along with their followers.

The absurdity of this is almost certainly why Herbert left it as something which happened between books. But also, the detachment of Paul from the horrors of the Jihad is mirrored for the readers because we like him, have no experience with it firsthand.