"Full Pirate Regalia is part of my religion" says student

OK, it's 2AM and I'm posting in P&C a lot. This has got to stop. But not just yet.

Here is an article about a kid who claims his Pastafarian faith requires him to wear "full pirate regalia" at all times. If a Muslim can wear a turban and other things, why can't a Pastafarian wear his analogous religious clothing?

Really, I don't care about some mouthy high school student's idea of social protest. As it relates to religion, this is old hat. But I do wonder at what point public school stopped being about learning, and became day-prison for young adults. When did students stop being citizens, and school stopped being subject to the charter of rights? I got into quite a bit of trouble, in my highschool, for loudly and constantly criticizing the principals for stifling any and all outspoken opinions from within the student body. "You're here to LEARN, not THINK!"

Why does this kid's right to be a smart-ass go out the window when he's in school? I know it's supposed to be self-evident or whatever that teachers deserve respect, and kids must be forced into an unrealistic simulacrum of real society for seven hours a day, but I've just never gotten it. I didn't get in elementary school, not in high-school, and still don't get it now. Honestly, what would be so bad about letting kids wear t-shirts that make political statements (even "God Hates Fags" if that's their choice.) Why are schools apparently embassies of some dictatorship?

The two pictures selected for that article are amazing.

I'm sorry, but this is priceless:

Pastafarians follow the Flying Spaghetti Monster (pictured), and believe that the world was created by the touch of his noodly appendage. Furthermore, they acknowledge pirates as being 'absolute divine beings', and stress that the worldwide decline in the number of pirates has directly led to global warming.

Clearly, these guys are onto something. A flying Spaghetti Monster. Genius!

The deadpan writing and pictures in the article are awesome.

Why does this kid's right to be a smart-ass go out the window when he's in school? I know it's supposed to be self-evident or whatever that teachers deserve respect, and kids must be forced into an unrealistic simulacrum of real society for seven hours a day, but I've just never gotten it. I didn't get in elementary school, not in high-school, and still don't get it now. Honestly, what would be so bad about letting kids wear t-shirts that make political statements (even "God Hates Fags" if that's their choice.) Why are schools apparently embassies of some dictatorship?

I seem to recall that the argument is based on the disruptiveness of the action/speech. You right to express yourself is directly tied to how it negatively impacts the learning of others.

Personally, I have no issue with schools setting boundaries. It is training for later in life.

DrunkenSleipnir wrote:

The two pictures selected for that article are amazing.

Yep, it's not full pirate regalia unless you're being chased by islanders.

Personally, I have no issue with schools setting boundaries. It is training for later in life.

Very true. Just like finding out what happens when you ratchet up the weirdness. There's a reason we are not all Raoul Duke.

Robear wrote:
Personally, I have no issue with schools setting boundaries. It is training for later in life.

Very true. Just like finding out what happens when you ratchet up the weirdness. There's a reason we are not all Raoul Duke.

Took my daughter to Hannibal, MO last week. This seems appropriate:

Mark Twain wrote:

It's a good idea to obey all the rules when you're young just so you'll have the strength to break them when you're old.

Morrolan wrote:

...Why are schools apparently embassies of some dictatorship?

I think you answered your own question here. Schools are dictatorships... those teachers and students that tow the line and work for little to no pay without question are rewarded with grades and heads of department...ships...
Pile "Lack of understanding and application of basic American rights and liberties" to the list of what is wrong with schools and teachers today. Frankly, it is pretty low on the list.

Copingsaw wrote:

I'm sorry, but this is priceless:

Pastafarians follow the Flying Spaghetti Monster (pictured), and believe that the world was created by the touch of his noodly appendage. Furthermore, they acknowledge pirates as being 'absolute divine beings', and stress that the worldwide decline in the number of pirates has directly led to global warming.

Clearly, these guys are onto something. A flying Spaghetti Monster. Genius!

A divine being with a noodly appendage...classic stuff!

You know, I want to say this kid is totally cool, but I'm afraid that if I met him he would be a complete tool. In fact, I'm sure of it.

Fedaykin98 wrote:

You know, I want to say this kid is totally cool, but I'm afraid that if I met him he would be a complete tool. In fact, I'm sure of it.

I did some research on the results of the Milgram Experiment a while back and it turns out that the folks that actually had the balls to tell the "authorities" to go piss up a rope when they were told to electricute a human subject were WAY overrepresented by arrogant assholes.

The kid may be a tool, but thank goodness tools like that exist.

Paleocon wrote:
Fedaykin98 wrote:

You know, I want to say this kid is totally cool, but I'm afraid that if I met him he would be a complete tool. In fact, I'm sure of it.

I did some research on the results of the Milgram Experiment a while back and it turns out that the folks that actually had the balls to tell the "authorities" to go piss up a rope when they were told to electricute a human subject were WAY overrepresented by arrogant assholes.

The kid may be a tool, but thank goodness tools like that exist.

ah yes the infamous experiment that now a days would be classified as torture... ah the good old days of science...

Nosferatu wrote:
Paleocon wrote:
Fedaykin98 wrote:

You know, I want to say this kid is totally cool, but I'm afraid that if I met him he would be a complete tool. In fact, I'm sure of it.

I did some research on the results of the Milgram Experiment a while back and it turns out that the folks that actually had the balls to tell the "authorities" to go piss up a rope when they were told to electricute a human subject were WAY overrepresented by arrogant assholes.

The kid may be a tool, but thank goodness tools like that exist.

ah yes the infamous experiment that now a days would be classified as torture... ah the good old days of science...

I've actually not understood why people thought this was cruel. They later contacted all participants who said that, far from regretting it, they were actually happy that they had taken part. IMO, causing someone a bit of anxiety is not close to cruel.

Morrolan wrote:
Nosferatu wrote:
Paleocon wrote:
Fedaykin98 wrote:

You know, I want to say this kid is totally cool, but I'm afraid that if I met him he would be a complete tool. In fact, I'm sure of it.

I did some research on the results of the Milgram Experiment a while back and it turns out that the folks that actually had the balls to tell the "authorities" to go piss up a rope when they were told to electricute a human subject were WAY overrepresented by arrogant assholes.

The kid may be a tool, but thank goodness tools like that exist.

ah yes the infamous experiment that now a days would be classified as torture... ah the good old days of science...

I've actually not understood why people thought this was cruel. They later contacted all participants who said that, far from regretting it, they were actually happy that they had taken part. IMO, causing someone a bit of anxiety is not close to cruel.

yeah making someone think they had caused the death of another human, that might cause just a tad bit of anxiety...

Nosferatu wrote:

yeah making someone think they had caused the death of another human, that might cause just a tad bit of anxiety...

As a (mostly) white male who was raised by TV and public schools, I feel qualified to say that it's not so bad... once you get used to it. Kind of like jumping in a cold lake. It only bothers you until you lose feeling. I think if, for example, an African American came up to me and demanded reparations, I might respond by yawning. That, or treat him like any other person who asks me for money on the street.

Ok, hopefuilly I'm sidestepping being unintentionally terribly offensive there.

While I admire the kid's gumption (and I'm sure he's a real pleasure at home :wink:), the idea that religious beliefs should be treated that lightly doesn't really jive with what I know of the blood that gets spilled in the name of intolerance.

wordsmythe wrote:
Nosferatu wrote:

yeah making someone think they had caused the death of another human, that might cause just a tad bit of anxiety...

I think if, for example, an African American came up to me and demanded reparations, I might respond by yawning. That, or treat him like any other person who asks me for money on the street.

If an African American came up to me and demanded reparations I would laugh in his face, then call him a racist idiot.

Nosferatu wrote:
wordsmythe wrote:
Nosferatu wrote:

yeah making someone think they had caused the death of another human, that might cause just a tad bit of anxiety...

I think if, for example, an African American came up to me and demanded reparations, I might respond by yawning. That, or treat him like any other person who asks me for money on the street.

If an African American came up to me and demanded reparations I would laugh in his face, then call him a racist idiot.

Yeah, definitely siding with Nosferatu on that one. I am already pretty resistant to part with my money, even with good cause. The idea that I should pay someone for what my ancestors (might not) have done to his ancestors is, for lack of a better word, stupid.

edit: I can type, really!

sgt. racoon wrote:
Nosferatu wrote:
wordsmythe wrote:
Nosferatu wrote:

yeah making someone think they had caused the death of another human, that might cause just a tad bit of anxiety...

I think if, for example, an African American came up to me and demanded reparations, I might respond by yawning. That, or treat him like any other person who asks me for money on the street.

If an African American came up to me and demanded reparations I would laugh in his face, then call him a racist idiot.

Yeah, definitely siding with Nosferatu on that one. I am already pretty resistant to part with my money, even with good cause. The idea that I should pay someone for what my ancestors (might not) have done to his ancestors is, for lack of a better word, stupid.

edit: I can type, really!

Threaten someone with property loss, real or imagined, and people don't respond real well to that.

On another note, that Flying Spagetti Monster is what usually comes up after I've toppled about 12 Lone Stars or one bad, bad bottle of Jack.

If this kid were really into all of this, he would go around asking those solid Christians in his school why they're not dressed appropriately to worship at the feet of the almighty. God and Spagetti Monsters just love pirates.

A divine being with a noodly appendage...classic stuff!

Just as a point of order, 93_confirmed: if you wish to show proper respect for the Pastafarian religion, the phrases "Noodly Appendage" and "His Noodly Appendage" should always be capitalized. It's not just any old appendage, you know.

Malor wrote:
A divine being with a noodly appendage...classic stuff!

Just as a point of order, 93_confirmed: if you wish to show proper respect for the Pastafarian religion, the phrases "Noodly Appendage" and "His Noodly Appendage" should always be capitalized. It's not just any old appendage, you know.

His Noodly Appendage, (Sauce be upon It) or (SbuI).