IT guy toolkit

After I learned about MSE going down the tubes I did a little research and switched over to Avast. I had to do a little tweaking to make it quit chirping at me in the systray, but so far so good.

Whats the deal with MSE? I hadn't heard anything about it going downhill.

MS have stopped development on it. Sadly, I've not found a decent replacement for relatives who won't pay for AV, but won't stand for intrusive ads, yearly sign-ups or all the other stuff that the free offerings usually entail.

Wow, didn't know that. That really sucks.

So is Avast the antivirus of choice for Windows 7 these days?

I'm still using the combination of MSE and Malwarebytes, and gather that it's time to spend some money on a better solution.

I'm sticking with NOD32. It's worth paying for.

http://www.eset.com/us/

Kaspersky is supposed to be pretty good, but it is SUPER invasive, and then they advertise at you. NOT impressed.

Malor wrote:
Kaspersky is supposed to be pretty good, but it is SUPER invasive, and then they advertise at you. NOT impressed.

I ended up getting it anyways. Looking at customer reviews some of the other programs seemed to be much worse offenders. I have been running it for a week and haven't had an ad yet. Did you check if there was some sort checkbox to turn it off?

Oh, it didn't do it for several months, but it eventually came up telling me that I should tell all my friends about how great Kaspersky was. It is absolutely unacceptable for an AV product to do that, in my view. I didn't see an opt-out, but even if something like that exists, it's never something I should need to opt out of.

Marketing messages from a paid product, given a super-privileged position in my system, is something I find unethical.

A message telling me it was going to expire in a couple weeks would have been okay, but that's the only thing it should be bothering me about, not evangelizing me to market their product for them.

I like Ccleaner and Defraggler.

Tdsskiller is nice for rootkits.

And for installing all the runtimes and extra software on a new pc, I got to Ninite.

And as for AV, I agree with

I'm sticking with NOD32. It's worth paying for.
ESET is the way to go.

I use a bunch of tools and utilities, these most of the time though. I will list more later.
Some of this stuff has probably already been listed but I didn't want to roll thru 7 pages to see if it had, sorry if they are repeats.

If you're a Windows jock, ConEmu is an outstanding utility; it lets you have a console window of pretty much any size and font you want, and will talk to CMD.EXE, Powershell, and Cygwin at the very least, and maybe other things.

However, in messing around with that, I found out something kind of cool. For years and years, I've thought that the built-in Windows command prompt was stuck in 80 columns, because you can't resize the window. But you can resize the window from the prompt!

This command:

mode con: COLS=132 LINES=30

in a default command prompt window will resize it to 132x30. Note that this, then, has no scrollback; the 30 lines that show are all that exist, and you can't look back through history.

The default LINES is set at 300, which normally gives you a fair bit of scrollback. If you just do a COLS=132 without a LINES, then it's the same as if you did LINES=300. This will instantly resize the window to fill the screen vertically; you'll have to manually shrink it again, if you want it to be a reasonable size. This might be worth it for the history.

Of course, ConEmu just fixes the problem completely. I like running it in 132x30 with a nice big Consolas font. It looks great.

And, I'll tell ya, ConEmu has more configuration options that I can easily count. No matter what you like to do with your command prompt windows, there's probably an option for it.

There's a menu option to resize the command window, change text colors, etc. I think it's under the Edit menu, which is a bit weird. Or at least there was one from forever until recently. I don't know if I've checked for it in win 7.

Yeah, LOVE ConEmu. I use Source Code Pro for the font though.

ConEmu, Chocolatey, PSGet, PSReadLine, and Posh-Git. Mmm, mmm, good.

complexmath wrote:
There's a menu option to resize the command window, change text colors, etc. I think it's under the Edit menu, which is a bit weird. Or at least there was one from forever until recently. I don't know if I've checked for it in win 7.
Yeah it is still around even on Windows 8 and 2012 Server. Has been there since Win XP at least, maybe even Windows 98. It's under Properties...

IMAGE(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/281072/cmd-props.png)

I use ConEmu mainly because it keeps my command prompt clutter down and it can use PuTTy as a shell too.

Damn, all this time, and I never saw that.

Con-emu also let's you set a key bind to hide-show the window Quake console style, which is cute.
I purely use it to host posh-git tabs so I can keep all three work repos up, and I changed my prompt to be the branch name which gets shown as the tab title, so I never forget if I'm on master.

Ultimate Boot CD for windows--I mainly use it for the hard drive diagnostics on the cd. you'll have to turn off the ahci for most of them tho' or set the sata to ide temporarily

Ultimate Boot cd:
http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/download.html

very useful. Also Eset NOD32 has the best heuristics right now and is dealing with the main source of attacks(at least for my customers) which are the advertisements in web pages.

Is O'Reilly's Running Linux still the book to get, or has something else superseded it?

stereo sound test
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqH4...

very handy, my speakers are plugged into the green one and I was afraid my new headset wouldn't be stereo (stereo is actually very important in Planetside 2)

Specing a new VESA-MITX build and thought I'd throw my hat into this particular ring. If you're using an SSD then you want to avoid using a defrag app on it. In lieu of defrag tools, look into TRIM options... assuming it's not enabled through your SSD's firmware

What's the current difference / preference between memtest86 and memtest86+? It seems memtest86 was last updated last month, while + hasn't been updated in a 1 1/2 years.

I need something to replace Avast as a free anti-virus solution. The constant pop-ups are driving me up a wall.

active or reactive scanning? Malwarebytes and trendmicro housecall both have free reactive scanners that do decent jobs.

I suspect any of the free active scanners are going to have similar popups to avast, even malware bytes will suggest the paid version to enable active scanning but at least that's only when you run it.

"Please answer this survey!"

"Did you know your computer is running slow because of all these programs?"

"Anyone can monitor your internet activity!"

Are reactive scanners useful for anything more than confirmation that it's time to resort to nukes? Once a machine is compromised I'm too afraid of stealth viruses to trust cleaning.

mrtomaytohead wrote:
What's the current difference / preference between memtest86 and memtest86+? It seems memtest86 was last updated last month, while + hasn't been updated in a 1 1/2 years.

I have switched to memtest86 v6. It works on all the Macs at work and it tests for the new row hammer DDR3 exploit / fault.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/rowhamm...

Hitman pro is worth every penny.
Even if you stick with the free version, it will show you where to go in the registry or cookies to get rid of nasty stuff.