"HD DVD/BD Cracked" reports once again

Not only about inidividual keys this time, however:

Those cooky kids over at the Doom9 forums hate themselves some DRM. Not more than two months after discovering a means to extract the HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc "volume keys" to decrypt AACS DRM on individual films, we're now getting word that DRM hacker arnezami has found the "processing key" used to decrypt the DRM on all HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc films. Let's break this down for what it is: instead of needing individual keys for each and every high-definition film -- of which there are many -- the processing key can be used to unlock, decrypt, and backup every HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc film released so far.

This is awesome. The studios spent so much money and effort on their encryption method, even to the detriment of the film quality itself, and it gets cracked in just a couple of months. Cracked solid too, not some temporary thing.

The sad thing is if they'd redirected most of that effort to film quality and remastering titles to be re-released, and just used some stupid trivial copy protection, they'd have far healthier sales and the same level of copy protection (i.e. none). But hey, since when has this ever been about making money with them?

PyromanFO wrote:

The sad thing is if they'd redirected most of that effort to film quality and remastering titles to be re-released, and just used some stupid trivial copy protection, they'd have far healthier sales and the same level of copy protection (i.e. none). But hey, since when has this ever been about making money with them?

QFT. You tell it, brother.

The other thing about this is most hackers only do this because it's challenging. If the copy protection was easy, it'd be cracked, everyone would move on, and you wouldn't have "FORMAT CRACKED AGAIN" in the news every 5 minutes. Though I understand the position they're in, the studios won't touch anything without assurances it's secure, even though that's impossible. So they have to look like they're trying. Still, it's just a gigantic circle-jerk of stupidity.

Legally, any copy protection as as good as another, which makes all the effort doubly stupid.

(I read the DMCA and rulings, and that makes me sad.)

wordsmythe wrote:

Legally, any copy protection as as good as another, which makes all the effort doubly stupid.

(I read the DMCA and rulings, and that makes me sad.)

Even more amusing is that the professional pirates don't even need to bother crackign the protection. Your own pressing factory, and, hey, let's use this nifty disc as our master.

So, let's put the locks on the part of the gate that no-one actually uses.

Maybe I'll care in 5 years, when I have an HDTV. And by then, I should have a fast enough internet connection to download those huge movies