The big "How do I choose an HDTV?" thread.

ccoates wrote:

What's weird is that on the Xbox Series X, the Blu-ray has no effect. As in no changes I make to the TV's settings seem to have any effect on the image. Adjusting the contrast or brightness seems to just change the overall picture brightness, which doesn't make any sense.

Maybe the XSX or the Blu-ray app from the Microsoft Store does some sort of automated adjustments behind the scenes? If I use the Xbox's built-in calibration from Settings the picture can be tuned as expected.

On the U7G you can tweak the settings per source, so that's what I'm doing for now, but it's really puzzling.

It has to do with freesync/G-Sync being enabled, from what I’ve read up on about Hisense models.

trueheart78 wrote:

It has to do with freesync/G-Sync being enabled, from what I’ve read up on about Hisense models.

I'll have to check that! I swear I had Freesync toggled off for every source though. It only seems to happen on the Xbox.

Edit: It's not Freesync. I didn't have that enabled on any source or video mode.

I've checked toggling off every possible setting that could be to blame, and I think it's just something Xbox specific.

Calibration Blu-rays work fine with the PS5, and I copied some of the calibration test videos to my Nvidia Shield TV and they work as expected there too.

Edit: Edit:

I toggled off every single video mode/advanced option on the Xbox, then *rebooted* it. And now everything works as expected. So one of them (I'm not sure which) must do some sort of adjustments on the fly that makes using a calibration tool impossible (other than the dashboard one, so maybe it knows not to run that extra processing during the built-in test?)

I'm going to re-enable all those video options/modes now that I'm done, but still kinda interesting.

So tuning the TV to the Disney WoW disc I ended up with... values really close to what I had from the Xbox tool, honestly.

Using the WoW disc, my contrast/brightness for the XSX is Contrast 50 and Brightness 52 (using the Xbox tool it was Contrast 48 and Brightness 54). On the Shield TV it's Contrast 49 and Brightness 52. On the PS5 I ended up with Contrast 50 and Brightness 50.

So honestly I could've probably just left everything at 50 or stuck with one of the middle-of-the-road default picture modes and the difference wouldn't be THAT drastic.

Now I can stop tinkering and see how all this looks with some 4k games!

ccoates wrote:

Now I can stop tinkering and see how all this looks with some 4k games!

Glad you got everything sorted! 4k HDR on these sets are a treat!

https://wccftech.com/hdmi-licensing-...

You can’t make up this kind of dumb.

LG has announced their 2022 OLED lineup at CES

https://www.cnet.com/tech/home-enter...

The good news is that they have the much requested 42" size this year which should appeal to some gamers that still were on the fence with the idea of a 48" "Monitor"

Sony has also announced an OLED TV that uses Samsung's fancy OLED tech that boosts brightness and color accuracy beyond what LG can currently do with their panels. It remains to be seen if that will be worth the no doubt premium that Sony and Samsung will attach to those sets.

Also LG has a 98" OLED this year which most mortals won't be able to afford but man that would be an amazing set and a real alternative to a projector setup.

Imagine trying to move it though or even the mechanics of delivery and setup.

Let's see if this really is a good alternative to OLED.

slazev wrote:

Let's see if this really is a good alternative to OLED.

it is OLED.

Yeah it's just tweaked OLED. It'll be brighter and have a wider color spectrum, but otherwise still an OLED.

Agree with the others. It is evolutionary not revolutionary.

I'm still wanting a new TV for gaming, but I am probably going to hold out for either OLED to get more affordable or MicroLED. I am glad to see just about every new TV announced this year is claiming to support HDMI 2.1 with many of them including call outs for supporting VRR and other gaming focused features. Of course I bought my current TV because I came home one night to my old TV doing this (and it completely died soon after) so here is hoping that doesn't happen again.

Rykin wrote:

I am glad to see just about every new TV announced this year is claiming to support HDMI 2.1

Well now that they just rebranded HDMI 2.0 into HDMI 2.1, of course everything is gonna be labeled as HDMI 2.1. You have to look closely to make sure any of them actually are what 2.1 was previously supposed to mean. All the new 2.1 features are now considered "optional" for 2.1 compliance.

Which is why I put "claiming" in there

Any thoughts on Samsung's The Frame TV? I was debating between a thin LG OLED TV and that for my new house. But damn, that Frame TV looks really good as a piece of art. The TV will be mounted on top of fireplace mantle.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/2UTfoV1.png)

Seems kind of gimicky and as someone who runs seasonal picture screensavers on their TV, there is a big difference between a picture on a wall and a TV showing a picture due to the amount of light the TV puts out. If it is a nice TV and not a big premium and you like it, go for it as it will probably look nice in that spot. Just be clear it will not look like a picture on the wall, it will look like a TV showing a picture.

I'd be curious how it works also if you hook up another box like a Roku or AppleTV instead of using the built-in apps. Does the art function still work seamlessly?

The idea of the breakout box so you only have a single cable running to the TV is nice, but the purpose of that is so you can mount it directly to the wall as close as possible like a painting. In your case where it is over a fireplace, you are probably going to want a regular adjustable mount anyway so you can tilt it down to be in line with your seating, so the slim mount kind of loses some of its usefulness.

LeapingGnome wrote:

Seems kind of gimicky and as someone who runs seasonal picture screensavers on their TV, there is a big difference between a picture on a wall and a TV showing a picture due to the amount of light the TV puts out. If it is a nice TV and not a big premium and you like it, go for it as it will probably look nice in that spot. Just be clear it will not look like a picture on the wall, it will look like a TV showing a picture.

I'd be curious how it works also if you hook up another box like a Roku or AppleTV instead of using the built-in apps. Does the art function still work seamlessly?

The idea of the breakout box so you only have a single cable running to the TV is nice, but the purpose of that is so you can mount it directly to the wall as close as possible like a painting. In your case where it is over a fireplace, you are probably going to want a regular adjustable mount anyway so you can tilt it down to be in line with your seating, so the slim mount kind of loses some of its usefulness.

Thanks for the input. I will not be tilting this TV down. I am mounting it as close to the wall as possible. Was planning to do that with the OLED.

TheGameguru wrote:

https://wccftech.com/hdmi-licensing-...

You can’t make up this kind of dumb.

I used to believe the standardization of physical ports would put an end to certain tech-averse relatives' issues. Now I miss the days where I could just say "plug the cable where it fits, in the same color where applicable".

dejanzie wrote:
TheGameguru wrote:

https://wccftech.com/hdmi-licensing-...

You can’t make up this kind of dumb.

I used to believe the standardization of physical ports would put an end to certain tech-averse relatives' issues. Now I miss the days where I could just say "plug the cable where it fits, in the same color where applicable".

As someone who works AV/Computer Tech Support USB-C has been one of the worst things to come along in years just because it is being used with multiple connection protocols and for some things that don't comply with any other spec that would have used a proprietary connector in the past (the dock connector on the Switch and Analogue Pocket for instance). You see a USB-C port and think "great it is USB-C" but then you have to wonder is it USB 3? USB 2? Thunderbolt? USB 4? Just a power port with no data? Something else?

HDMI is at least still mostly just an AV standard (even though they added support for networking via HDMI I have yet to see anything really use that), but the recent 2.0/2.1 shenanigans have muddied the waters. You plug one HDMI device into a monitor or TV and you usually at least get something. Now maybe you were hoping for 4k/120Hz and you can only get 4k/60Hz but at least it usually works.