The big "How do I choose an HDTV?" thread.

Yeah that makes sense if you are wall mounting and then a three foot desk in front of you. Will definitely want a larger size then. One suggestion would be to cut out the 48" and 42" sizes out of cardboard and put them on the wall to see what you think and how much you have to move your head to see side to side.

LeapingGnome wrote:

Yeah that makes sense if you are wall mounting and then a three foot desk in front of you. Will definitely want a larger size then. One suggestion would be to cut out the 48" and 42" sizes out of cardboard and put them on the wall to see what you think and how much you have to move your head to see side to side.

Gotcha.

Malor wrote:

It'll probably be a little cheaper, will have DisplayPort connections, will have USB connections, and the firmware may be better-tuned for desktop use.

These monitors use a four-pixel format, so they can apparently display red lines with solid yellow or green with 4:4:4 (proper) PC output. This is a closeup sample, from the rtings.com article:

(spoilered because it's large):

Spoiler:

IMAGE(https://www.rtings.com/images/reviews/monitor/lg/48-cx-oled/48-cx-oled-red-line-pixel-large.jpg)

The monitors might not do that.

To be clear the 42" Panel will be a HDTV.. not specifically a monitor so I wouldn't anticipate DisplayPort on them.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:
TheGameguru wrote:

LG announced a 42” OLED for 2021. PC users are going to be really happy.

Any serious reasons to hold out for that vs the current 48"? I think my desk is wide enough that I'll be sitting at about 4 feet from it.

Up to you.. I know the general feeling from many PC gamers is that the 55" and 48" Models were still too big and that they were holding out for 42" or 43" size. I went from a 55" C9 to the 48" CX and the difference was striking.. the 48" is far more comfortable to use on a day to day than the 55".. I would actually think the 42" would be even nicer and I will strongly consider it when it releases at some point in 2021.

I would anticipate though much like in 2020 the 42" will show up around Q3 in limited quantities before wider release in Q4. That's just my thinking based on how the 48" rolled out.. but it could be it shows up side by side in Q1-Q2 with all the other sizes.

Ars Technica is saying that LG is going to ship actual OLED computer monitors this year.

Per this article:

We're not quite down to 30 inches yet, but LG did announce its first 31.5-inch OLED computer monitor—the 4K 32EP950, or "UltraFine OLED Pro," which offers 99% coverage of both DCI-P3 and Adobe RGB. Ports will include one HDMI, two DisplayPort, and three USB with at least one of those USB ports being USB-C. There's no information on pricing or release date yet (pricy, to be sure), but things are amping up: Samsung is the world's other big OLED panel producer, and it is also planning to start rolling out OLED monitors at similar sizes.

So that one is 31.5", 4K, deep color, and DisplayPort. If they work out that wonky red line thing, that sounds pretty appealing.

If it’s anything like the Dell one it will be $3K+. I get it for pros that need accurate color and CAD for accurate pixel accuracy but for most gamers it’s better to go with the 42” or 48” HDTV’s and stick with HDMI 2.1 which honestly has plenty of bandwidth.

TheGameguru wrote:

and stick with HDMI 2.1 which honestly has plenty of bandwidth.

Yeah, HDMI 2.1 can drive 4K at 144hz uncompressed, or 240hz with compression.

I expect displays (that people actually buy and use) are generally going to plateau at 4K for a while, similar to how 1080p reigned as both TV and PC monitor resolution of choice for so long. I imagine the next few years will be less about pushing up to 8K and more about pushing down the cost (and pushing up the peak brightness) of OLED.

TheGameguru wrote:
tuffalobuffalo wrote:
TheGameguru wrote:

LG announced a 42” OLED for 2021. PC users are going to be really happy.

Any serious reasons to hold out for that vs the current 48"? I think my desk is wide enough that I'll be sitting at about 4 feet from it.

Up to you.. I know the general feeling from many PC gamers is that the 55" and 48" Models were still too big and that they were holding out for 42" or 43" size. I went from a 55" C9 to the 48" CX and the difference was striking.. the 48" is far more comfortable to use on a day to day than the 55".. I would actually think the 42" would be even nicer and I will strongly consider it when it releases at some point in 2021.

I would anticipate though much like in 2020 the 42" will show up around Q3 in limited quantities before wider release in Q4. That's just my thinking based on how the 48" rolled out.. but it could be it shows up side by side in Q1-Q2 with all the other sizes.

Ordered the 48". I don't do any competitive PC gaming, so I think it'll be fine.

If I were to get a 4K Blu-ray player for that 48" OLED, what would my best name brand budget option be? This will be an office, but because it's a nice OLED, I'd like to check out some 4K Blu-rays on it.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

If I were to get a 4K Blu-ray player for that 48" OLED, what would my best name brand budget option be? This will be an office, but because it's a nice OLED, I'd like to check out some 4K Blu-rays on it.

There aren't really budget UHD blu ray players without serious issues or just missing features. The going rate is going to be $180 to $250 for the most basic UHD players. There's an LG for $150 but it doesn't support anything but HDR10. No Dolby Vision, no HDR10+, no HLG.

A lot of people love the Sony X700 model. It's got Dolby Vision and pretty much everything else. That said, there are growing numbers of reports of them just stopping reading discs after barely a year. For over $200 that seems not great. Granted, you'll find those reviews for all blu ray players. That's the nature of disc players. I have no direct experience.

The other current recommendation on the lower (relatively) end of the price spectrum is the Panasonic DP-UB420, which I can vouch for at least as I've been using one with my projector for over a year and a half. But for an LG OLED I would definitely recommend looking for something that will do Dolby Vision for the discs that have it. DV stuff really is still the best HDR experience.

If you go for DV you're kind of stuck with the Sony models and I think one of LG's players that's also $200.

Or spending $400 or more.

Thin_J wrote:
tuffalobuffalo wrote:

If I were to get a 4K Blu-ray player for that 48" OLED, what would my best name brand budget option be? This will be an office, but because it's a nice OLED, I'd like to check out some 4K Blu-rays on it.

There aren't really budget UHD blu ray players without serious issues or just missing features. The going rate is going to be $180 to $250 for the most basic UHD players. There's an LG for $150 but it doesn't support anything but HDR10. No Dolby Vision, no HDR10+, no HLG.

A lot of people love the Sony X700 model. It's got Dolby Vision and pretty much everything else. That said, there are growing numbers of reports of them just stopping reading discs after barely a year. For over $200 that seems not great. Granted, you'll find those reviews for all blu ray players. That's the nature of disc players. I have no direct experience.

The other current recommendation on the lower (relatively) end of the price spectrum is the Panasonic DP-UB420, which I can vouch for at least as I've been using one with my projector for over a year and a half. But for an LG OLED I would definitely recommend looking for something that will do Dolby Vision for the discs that have it. DV stuff really is still the best HDR experience.

If you go for DV you're kind of stuck with the Sony models and I think one of LG's players that's also $200.

Or spending $400 or more.

Perfect! Thanks for the advise. After checking Amazon, I knew it was some sort of weird situation. I will have to make... some choices. Probably just go with an LG that's $200 something or throw dice with that Sony.

You are hooking up the 48" to your computer right? Did you already consider just having a BR drive for your computer?

LeapingGnome wrote:

You are hooking up the 48" to your computer right? Did you already consider just having a BR drive for your computer?

Is there a drive and not annoyingly bad software that will do 4K Blu-rays and HDR? That would be great. My current GTX 1080 probably doesn't do HDR, but a 3080 will.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:
LeapingGnome wrote:

You are hooking up the 48" to your computer right? Did you already consider just having a BR drive for your computer?

Is there a drive and not annoyingly bad software that will do 4K Blu-rays and HDR? That would be great. My current GTX 1080 probably doesn't do HDR, but a 3080 will.

There is currently no way to play Dolby Vision content from a PC, for a start.

A couple options offer basic HDR10 support but the software is bad.

PowerDVD in particular is garbage. I know, I tried it.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:
LeapingGnome wrote:

You are hooking up the 48" to your computer right? Did you already consider just having a BR drive for your computer?

Is there a drive and not annoyingly bad software that will do 4K Blu-rays and HDR? That would be great. My current GTX 1080 probably doesn't do HDR, but a 3080 will.

I haven't actually tried it, as I don't have an HDR display yet, but you should be able to configure Media Player Classic to do HDR, if you install it with MadVR. There's an option to pass HDR content through to the display somewhere in MadVR's configuration. And I think your 1080 will also handle HDR; I looked this up on Rock Paper Shotgun, and even my 970 will do that. (The big thing the 1000-series adds is supporting Gsync-on-Freesync; both do HDR, but your 1080 will also do adaptive sync.)

The easiest way to install MPC that I know of is the K-Lite Codec Pack, which I've been using for many years. I've seen it bundled with adware at times, so be very careful about options during the install.

From there, it's a matter of obtaining H.265-compressed, HDR versions of the movies you want. You can create them yourself, but I personally see no moral/ethical issue with buying the movie on BluRay and then getting someone else's converted version from one of the pirate sites. They'll know a lot more about video compression than most people, so you can take advantage of their expertise, while simultaneously paying for the content.

The media companies will disagree about the moral/ethical part, but since you could rip it yourself anyway, I really don't see a problem with letting someone else do the rip for you.

Thank you both! That seems very similar to the 1080p Blu-ray on PC situation back in the day, and I have no interest in fighting that. I'll just get a $200-$300 player at some point.

Thin_J wrote:
tuffalobuffalo wrote:

If I were to get a 4K Blu-ray player for that 48" OLED, what would my best name brand budget option be? This will be an office, but because it's a nice OLED, I'd like to check out some 4K Blu-rays on it.

There aren't really budget UHD blu ray players without serious issues or just missing features. The going rate is going to be $180 to $250 for the most basic UHD players. There's an LG for $150 but it doesn't support anything but HDR10. No Dolby Vision, no HDR10+, no HLG.

A lot of people love the Sony X700 model. It's got Dolby Vision and pretty much everything else. That said, there are growing numbers of reports of them just stopping reading discs after barely a year. For over $200 that seems not great. Granted, you'll find those reviews for all blu ray players. That's the nature of disc players. I have no direct experience.

The other current recommendation on the lower (relatively) end of the price spectrum is the Panasonic DP-UB420, which I can vouch for at least as I've been using one with my projector for over a year and a half. But for an LG OLED I would definitely recommend looking for something that will do Dolby Vision for the discs that have it. DV stuff really is still the best HDR experience.

If you go for DV you're kind of stuck with the Sony models and I think one of LG's players that's also $200.

Or spending $400 or more.

I went with the Sony X800M2 at $300. Has some issues, but there is digital coaxial out for audio which I can run to my Schiit audio DAC. Will do the Dolby Vision HDR although you have to hand hold it a bit.

Watching Blue Planet 2 on that 48" LG OLED. It's pretty glorious. Just using the home cinema mode for now. That color is pretty crazy.

Edit: I think I'll get the Klipsch 5.1 Cinema 600 soundbar for the office sound eventually. I don't care too much about sound quality but would like a simple, clean setup that does wireless 5.1. I have a super nice headphone setup for sound quality. Currently backordered, but my guess is they'll get some produced this year.

I have the Cinema 400 right now for temporary purposes in the living room and it sounds decent.

My wife and I started using paired HomePods with the Dolby Atmos setting for sound and wow is that nice. A sound bar might sound better and it only works with Apple TV, but we’re really enjoying it and it only cost $200. The cost of buying a pair of HomePod minis and moving the HomePods into the living room.

DSGamer wrote:

My wife and I started using paired HomePods with the Dolby Atmos setting for sound and wow is that nice. A sound bar might sound better and it only works with Apple TV, but we’re really enjoying it and it only cost $200. The cost of buying a pair of HomePod minis and moving the HomePods into the living room.

Wireless sound has improved a lot!

DSGamer wrote:

My wife and I started using paired HomePods with the Dolby Atmos setting for sound and wow is that nice. A sound bar might sound better and it only works with Apple TV, but we’re really enjoying it and it only cost $200. The cost of buying a pair of HomePod minis and moving the HomePods into the living room.

I was wondering how well those worked, I was thinking about getting a couple until I realized I wouldn't be able to use them with my PS4 or 4K player.

Thin_J wrote:

There is currently no way to play Dolby Vision content from a PC, for a start.

A couple options offer basic HDR10 support but the software is bad.

PowerDVD in particular is garbage. I know, I tried it.

Malor wrote:

From there, it's a matter of obtaining H.265-compressed, HDR versions of the movies you want. You can create them yourself, but I personally see no moral/ethical issue with buying the movie on BluRay and then getting someone else's converted version from one of the pirate sites. They'll know a lot more about video compression than most people, so you can take advantage of their expertise, while simultaneously paying for the content.

Ah, so nice that in 2021, media companies still manage to make you feel like a chump for obtaining their content legally.

As for me, I think I'm done with the whole physical media thing. My Blurays are currently in my basement storage, and I've been slowly buying more and more digital movies during sales off iTunes. The fact that both Apple and Google now usually give you a free update to the 4K version once it becomes available is pretty sweet, and while I can tell the difference between a UHD and a streaming rental or purchase, it's at the point where it's not substantial enough for me to care anymore. I can see myself buying a few discs once I pick up a PS5 but I don't think it's ever going to be a significant format to me.

kuddles wrote:

I can see myself buying a few discs once I pick up a PS5 but I don't think it's ever going to be a significant format to me.

I used to own hundreds of DVDs but I only have 4 Blurays and one of them was purchased out of the bargain bin at Walmart just so I could use it to test a system at work.

I've ripped my roughly 100 DVD and Blu-ray collection and got a Plex lifetime pass. Rarely ever hit it up but it is there. I think maybe I hit up that collection 4 times in the last year and 3 of the cases it was to avoid commercials of basic cable on demand libraries but technically it was available for consumption. The one movie was Heat, my favorite.

Yeah. I have a PC running plex with 16TB of storage. Do full bitrate rips of every blu ray or 4k disc I buy to that server and they then all play natively with no re-encoding or anything on the Shield TV.

I might not be able to tell the difference on a 55 inch screen with some content, but on the projector... Imma need that full bitrate rip. The compressed ones you find online look real bad that big.

What encoding do you rip with? I was thinking about starting to use H.265 since my Synology natively supports it.

In did everything in h.264 since it was the most compatible with devices, I did many of my rips years ago and just kept it consistent, and most of my collection was DVDs so size wasn't as much of a concern.