The big "How do I choose an HDTV?" thread.

Agreed on all points. Beyond the consoles it seems even Netflix/Vudu have issues implementing hdr consistently, with dramatic differences showing up between their versions and uhd blu-ray.

My tv at least has a torch setting that works in hdr mode and that rtings actually recommends using. It does a pretty good job in brighter situations, but then it's painful to look at at night.

I usually watch in a dim or dark room. We recently watched Planet Earth II and Kingsman II on UHD Blu Ray and they were both jaw dropping. Much more so than any of the 4k Netflix shows I have watched.

However the time we noticed most was when streaming failed us. We rented atomic blond on Amazon 4k HDR and the stream would freeze at the same place every time. We ended up returning it for a refund and watching the 1080p stream. Back to back it felt washed out and grainy to the point where my girlfriend even mentioned it and she is not picky. It was that feeling of going back to DVDs after getting used to Bluerays.

I could see the average person not caring much about 4k HDR but couldn't the same also be said for Blu Ray and the first few years of 1080p? I mean cable companies still don't stream their channels in 1080p and I don't see too many people complaining.

I use a dim hue bulb in the room next to the family room so it’s pretty close to dark. I find that makes HDR content pop a bit more

Chairman_Mao wrote:

Beyond the consoles it seems even Netflix/Vudu have issues implementing hdr consistently, with dramatic differences showing up between their versions and uhd blu-ray.

We recently began rolling out HDR support at work and my coworker, who is a support specialist in video conversion, put it best: "HDR is a mess."

I imagine it's a little easier with studio-produced video for Netflix or Vudu, but on the user-generated video side building HDR support has been difficult to explain and understand from end-to-end; from figuring out what color spaces/profiles "qualify" as HDR to determining what devices and displays support HDR.

The escalation in resolution over the years was much easier to conceptualize versus color spaces.

/work-ish related rant

True glasses-free 3D enters the realm of possibility. Still a ways to go to enter the realm of affordability, though.