Europa Universalis 3

I couldnt figure out how to get an army on ships. I had a conquistador and was ready to go kick some native ass, had a nice big navy in port in the same province as the army, couldnt get the troops on the ships though.

Is there a way to speed up colonization? I send a new colonist every time I can but considering how long that takes, how often they fail (even with a supposed 80% chance) and how many you have to send to get to 1000 I cant really see ever finishing one. I played Portugal and pretty much focused entirely on colonization of Cuba, didnt get much of anything done.

CE is retail at CompUSA only, I think? Some kind of marketing deal?

The EU2 Wiki referenced from Paradox was good, so follow the EU3 one.

I couldnt figure out how to get an army on ships. I had a conquistador and was ready to go kick some native ass, had a nice big navy in port in the same province as the army, couldnt get the troops on the ships though.

The ships have to be transports - cogs in the early game. You should look through the ship menus till you find the descriptions of what you can build. In that list, I recall it shows "transport" for ships that can carry troops. For such a fleet, you'll also see a regimental capacity in it's description on-screen when you mouse over it, as I recall.

Is there a way to speed up colonization? I send a new colonist every time I can but considering how long that takes, how often they fail (even with a supposed 80% chance) and how many you have to send to get to 1000 I cant really see ever finishing one. I played Portugal and pretty much focused entirely on colonization of Cuba, didnt get much of anything done.

Takes decades, of course. Keep streaming them out there as you get them, and probably focus on improving one colony before developing another province.

I tend to focus on developing a few ports to use for further exploration, set up in New foundland, tortuga and down towards south africa so i had friendly ports for explorer to refit from, been playing with England for about 2 centuries. After a particularly bloody war I forced vassalization on Castille, so now whenever they find something new so do I. Pretty sweet deal really, I've given up on explorers and conquistadores and if they find an especially nice province I can try to cherry pick it.

Finally got my CE from Sweden today. I'm really impressed with the extras. The printed manual and strategy guide are excellent.

Despite what a lot of the hardcore veteran EU players on the official forums have said, I love the new approach Paradox has taken with the game. The 3d map is clear and easy to read. The interface is much more usable. I also appreciate the move away from the deterministic hyper-historical feel of the previous games. Pre-set historical events no longer make the gameplay so rigid and uniform from game to game. My hope is that they will decide to give the Hearts of Iron franchise the same overhaul using this engine.

Ok so this time Im playing Bavaria. I start at war with the Palantine and quickly get the military access rights from the countries between me and them. Raising about 8,000 men was no problem and I pretty much march over the two provinces of theirs that I know about. I occupy both and check out the peace options to see if they can make it worth my while to leave them alone since Im not entirely sure I want ownership of 2 provinces not connected to Bavaria. I cancelled the peace offer to see if I could figure out a proper conquering when a few months later both provinces are suddenly back fully under Palantine control like magic.

Is there some war time limit Im unaware of? The whole thing couldnt have been more than a year. I did do war taxes though I probably didnt need them. Im not sure if that had anything to do with it. The game is pretty much confusing the hell out of me. Are the overall mechanics of EU2 close enough that study of its wiki would help me figure out 3? Im having a hard time deciding if I should buy it with so much confusion.

It's possible you were at war as part of an alliance that you did not control. When you occupy a province, it still belongs to the original owner. That can only change if the province is ceded to you in a peace agreement. So then, while you were thinking, your alliance leader makes peace, and suddenly you are out of a war and of course the Palatine got their provinces back.

I strongly recommend that you consider the tutorials, but also check the EU2 Wiki. Important concepts are similar. The CE is truly worth it, since the strategy guide is actually useful and will walk you through the mental steps and tricks involved in deciding on goals, strategies, strengths and weaknesses.

The demo is however best described as a way to view the mechanics of the game. It is necessarily confusing without a guide, so I'd say if you are comfortable with the map and interface, and like the overall topic, buy the CE. It's got tons of information that will bring a better understanding of the game.

There really is very little chance of hitting the demo cold and having the "aha!" moment. You really need experience with another game in the series to be able to do that. And the way you get that experience is by tutorials, the relevant Wikis and the manual/guides available, as well as trial and error.

Also, if you like, we can arrange time on a weekend and get together with Teamspeak or Ventrilo or something, and I can walk you through the stuff you need to know in a few hours. Yes, it will take that long.

Im starting to understand that. (been reading the EU3 forums all morning) My war with the Palatine was in progress at the beginning of my game so there wasn't really much idea of why we were fighting. My plan was to unite much of eastern europe and go from there. I also started the game with an alliance with Austria so its possible they brokered peace on my behalf (when I did all the fighting and got robbed of the spoils!)

Its slowly gelling. I did the tutorials first thing so I got a handle on the interface but not much else Ill try again tonight and see if there's some fun to be had.

Edit: Im not liking the EU2 wiki. Ads on a wiki is sacrilege and it seems to redirect to its advertiser at times even when you click on a real wiki link.

You mean this wiki? All I see is a small bar of ads on the lower left side...? Oh, but then, on second try, I got redirected. I guess that's the price for free hosting...

Well, ask here if you need to.

If you like the concept of EU3 and want to try something similar, but more manageable, you can try some of the Paradox older games. The first EU, Two Thrones and Crown of the North are all on GamersGate for download for just 1 EUR/1 USD apiece. They are pretty fun, too, I have never played Crown of the North, so I went for it and bam - six hours gone

I've been enjoying my first war, but am having trouble not taking loans to pay for an army. Controlling key water regions is a huge help - you can literally block an ally from ever helping out your enemy.

I still need to get the hang of agreements - it seems like the things I would think are reasonable (getting a region I've occupied) are just flat out unacceptable unless you REALLY put the beat down on. Against a comparable power you should expect to be in a long war, and controlling war-time spending can make or break.

I've been playing this a while, and feel like I haven't even scratched the surface. I wish I had that guide with the CE, but as I said, I couldn't find it. Alas! I will take out my frustrations on Africa.

Don't forget war taxes! Also, consider your economy before going into war. If it's weak, build some tax buildings, which will take years. Always have your economy in order before a war of choice.

I just started a new game as France. Standard start date, so I was in war with England from the start. Brittany took Calais and Gascony, with my help, but then when he got rebels - as I was chasing an English army under Warwick all over SE France - he bailed from the fight, taking Calais and turning Gascony over to the English! And then while I regrouped, the English took Toulouse! But I had Meath, so I sieged Toulouse and chased Warwick around until he died.

His replacement was Charles I. For that, I trapped him and destroyed him. Then with Toulouse taken, I had a 34% advantage. I tried an invasion of England, but he have 18,000 troops waiting, to my 6000. I pulled back and suggested peace, giving me Gascony. After two proposals of the same thing, the third one took, and I was able to stand down 2/3 of my army to balance my budget. That's where I stand now.

Long, grueling war, but I humiliated the English, so that was worth it. And I got one of my core provinces back. Next, I think Brittany goes down.

I've just started scratching the surface, but so far I'm enjoying it. Even though there seems to be more micromanagement than before in many ways, it still seems a lot less overwhelming than the previous EU game. I think it's because I feel like it's more open-ended in what strategy I choose, whereas before I always felt that I was being punished in the name of historical accuracy (although part of that is due to my horrible economic planning and foresight in battles.)

Funny, to me there is much less micromanagement. Set the sliders and forget them for many, many years. And then they have the popup notifiers that remind you what conditions pertain in your kingdom. Information is only a click or two away, rather than buried in different menus.

I'd argue less micromanagement, not more.

War taxes only help so much...and when you've spend your money trying to be the first to get those sugar plantations in the New World a war declared on you can hurt

Started a game as England in 1492. I am going for trading and naval technology -so far so good. I am working on building up some alliances and trying to give my merchants the upperhand in my known Centers of Trade. My pre-existing alliance with Portugal immediately pulled me into a war with Morocco. I went along with it, but dragged my feet on sending any help. The war was over in a year or two after Portugal had won back a core province.

The strategy guide that comes with the CE is really excellent. If anyone reading does not have a copy of the game, look for the CE version as I think the guide by itself is worth the extra cost.

jakeleg wrote:

The strategy guide that comes with the CE is really excellent. If anyone reading does not have a copy of the game, look for the CE version as I think the guide by itself is worth the extra cost.

I wanted to say the same after I read through it today on a lengthy bus trip. Well worth the money, especially for a newbie. Gives useful hints for every type of player (trader, colonist, conqueror etc.) and explains pros and cons of sliders, technologies etc. very thoroughly. Plus the "history lessons" spread throughout are a nice read.

I went by Target yesterday and they still did not have any copies of EU3 on the shelf. According to the official boards, they are the only retailer in the US that is going to be carrying the CE. The floor monkey in the electronics section looked at me like I was an insane person when I asked about the game.

Me: "Do you know when you will be getting in Europa Universalis 3?' (pronounced slowly)

Floor monkey: "Euro what?"

Me: "Eu-ro-pa U-ni-ver-sal-is Three."

Floor monkey: "Is that on the Xbox 360?"

Me: "No, PC."

Floor monkey: (Calls on his walkie talkie to some guy named Brad.) "Hey Brad, have you heard of a new game called Euro Universe 3?"

Me: (Speaking loudly so that Brad on the walkie talkie can hear me:) "Actually, it is "Eu-ro-pa Uni-ver-sal-is 3."

Brad, through the walkie talkie: "Uhh, I don't have anything on that one yet. Check back next week."

Floor monkey: "Check back next week."

So I guess I'll check next week. I suspect they might have them by the end of the weekend.

I went ahead and picked it up from Best Buy (non CE) Its on sale for $35 there (at least it was through the website and in-store pickup)

So my first game I take Bavaria and Im doing pretty good, spreading my borders so we can bring good beer to all and managing to stay out of debt. I was actually doing pretty well but I noticed one strange thing. As I fought wars alongside my allies, some wars started by me and others where I answered their calls to battle, my relations with them actually decreased more and more. Austria and the Papal State were some of my stronger allies and strangely, when I agreed to help the Papal state, brought 10,000 men to lift the siege on Roma and take 2 Sicilian provinces, giving one to the Papal State, at the end of the war my relations with them was WORSE than with Sicily. My army was actually trapped in the 'ankle' of Italy because even though I still had an alliance with the papal state, they had at some point revoked my military access and wouldnt give it back. That was the only major confusion I had in that game. Is that a bug? normal? am I doing something wrong?

That's a pretty impressive conversation for a monkey.

So my first game I take Bavaria and Im doing pretty good, spreading my borders so we can bring good beer to all and managing to stay out of debt. I was actually doing pretty well but I noticed one strange thing. As I fought wars alongside my allies, some wars started by me and others where I answered their calls to battle, my relations with them actually decreased more and more. Austria and the Papal State were some of my stronger allies and strangely, when I agreed to help the Papal state, brought 10,000 men to lift the siege on Roma and take 2 Sicilian provinces, giving one to the Papal State, at the end of the war my relations with them was WORSE than with Sicily. My army was actually trapped in the 'ankle' of Italy because even though I still had an alliance with the papal state, they had at some point revoked my military access and wouldnt give it back. That was the only major confusion I had in that game. Is that a bug? normal? am I doing something wrong?

It's possible that your enemies were influencing the Papal State against you. They can do that with diplomats and money and your relations will drop.

Edit - Actually, I take that back. They can't do that directly, so there would have to be something else going on. Papal State...Hmmm. Is it possible they didn't approve of you attacking Sicily somehow, for reasons of religion?

Maybe, but they asked me to help them in their war. Sicily had sacked Rome and taken one of the Papal State's provinces so I went in and fixed that.

It also happened with Austria. We'd always been allies but didnt ever really fight much together in each other's wars. This time they asked me to help with Liege (a 1 province nation that Austria defeated and was sieging by the time my army got there) I helped with the siege there and against Bohemia and watched our relations steadilly decrease from its usual 190-200 area to about 100. I had noticed it happening earlier with nations like The Palatine who got me into war after war with their enemies and rescued them from oblivion more than once.

I wonder if my nation's power has something to do with it. Maybe jealousy but in most of the wars it gave me leadership for conducting the war and negotiations. Maybe they didnt like the way I handled things or felt I took more than my fair share of the spoils, but I havent found a way to read their minds yet. I may need to just get out of Eastern Europe or start later in the game because that region is just so crowded with different nations.

Unrelated question: Got advice for earning decent early income? I was doing okay getting about 50 ducats a year without minting money so I could build workshops in my provinces but it appears that the next step up from that is the manufactury and another related structure that cost 1000! I've rarely had more than 100 at any time and its too tempting to spend that to let it sit for 20 years to have enough to build that manufactury (and watch it all disappear for a measly 6-12 annual boost)

I've tried messing with merchants and centers of trade but my merchants are usually gone within a few months and my monthly investment rating seems tied to that and never goes back down even when merchants have failed or get pushed out, which just means less money overall for my effort. I've heard having a bad reputation gets your merchants pushed out faster but my 'badboy' rating is usually under 5 out of 36. No nation ever seems to have enough to consider warring for profit or selling provinces.

Robear wrote:

Funny, to me there is much less micromanagement. Set the sliders and forget them for many, many years. And then they have the popup notifiers that remind you what conditions pertain in your kingdom. Information is only a click or two away, rather than buried in different menus.

Yeah, that's kind of what I meant when I said it was less overwhelming. I suppose I could have worded it a bit better. There seems to be a lot more options overall, but you're not screwed if you aren't paying sharp attention to all of them.

I guess I'm not enough of an expert to really help you, Poly. You did get the 1.1 update? I hope it's not a bug.

Making money...some countries are better off than others. You can always cut costs by cutting your army and navy, and then maybe adjusting research and other spending, but I find that latter risky. Building new structures is usually good. But trade is paramount, so far as I've seen. Send multiple traders at once to one center of trade.

I wonder if my nation's power has something to do with it. Maybe jealousy but in most of the wars it gave me leadership for conducting the war and negotiations.

I remember that in EU2 (maybe 1, it's been awhile) any annexation of territory would hurt your relationship with nearby countries. I always considered it more of a game balance thing and just went along with it.

Minase wrote:
I wonder if my nation's power has something to do with it. Maybe jealousy but in most of the wars it gave me leadership for conducting the war and negotiations.

I remember that in EU2 (maybe 1, it's been awhile) any annexation of territory would hurt your relationship with nearby countries. I always considered it more of a game balance thing and just went along with it.

I think that in reality, stealing some guy's land tends to make those around you jumpy.

EU is a great series because it seeks accuracy more than just about any other big strategy title.

Robear wrote:

You can always cut costs by cutting your army and navy, and then maybe adjusting research and other spending, but I find that latter risky.

You don't have to actually disband your army/navy, just push the maintenance slider to the minimum. Morale will drop severely, but if you are not in war, you can save nice bucks using this strategy. Just remember to turn up maintenance few months before you plan to DOW someone to build up morale again.

Clarification: DOW=Declaration of War.

I know, but I was at my manpower max for this. Does pulling manpower for the army affect production like it does in Victoria? I forget.

Anyway, I kept about a third of the army. Just didn't need the others right away.

Wow. Spent the last 8 hours or so in EU3. I started a new game in 1453 as France, since I felt like doing some fighting. I was not disappointed.

I got into a few nice wars. Of course the first one against England - that went okay but Brittany walked away with Calais. So I looked around, and all the little provincial kingdoms in France were my vassals, except Avignon. So I waited ten years, mostly messing around with trade and raising their attitudes towards me. Then I started the process of annexation. First thing was to fight Brittany down and vassalize them.

It took 3-6 tries for each of the other kingdoms to join me. About one every 5-10 years, seems like, with all the investments I made. And in the middle, around 1475, I decided Burgundy was doing entirely too well. So when I noticed they were at war with Austria, I backstabbed them. The war was close at first, but all my little buddies chipped in and I was able to vassalize Burgundy! That was awesome. After that, I got Bouron, Orleannais and Provence. Then I was involved in a war against Sweden, via an alliance I had made with Norway. Won that one, too. Then I annexed Brittany on the first go!

So now all I'm lacking is Burgundy and Armagnac (and Avignon, but I have plans for Mr. Popey.) No obvious bugs, game plays solid and sweet and the AI is annoyingly capable, but beatable.

How are you all doing in your campaigns?

I'm having a blast with this game. It can be very interesting playing as a non-European nation. I tried Vijanayagar (southeastern India) and had a great time uniting the Indian subcontinent. I even changed to the Mughal Empire once I had conquered all of India, and now I'm moving to take Pakistan. That Timurid Empire sure is tough, but I'm slowly gaining ground.

I also played as Mecklenburg, and it was entertaining to be a trading powerhouse. I had monopolies in Antwerp, Andalucia, Lisbon, Novgorod, Lubeck, Venice, and Istanbul all at the same time at one point, which was earning me ridiculous amounts of money.