Finished Any Games Lately?

On Friday night, while my wife was working late, I decided I wanted a short experience that was completely different from the games I'd been playing -- so, for the first time ever, I played Portal. Got almost to GLaDOS that night, but got stuck on a late puzzle and finished up yesterday morning. The puzzles, at least through the 19 levels, were mostly all bite-sized and were great at progressively teaching mechanics, and then the last big "escape the facility" level was quite a nice final exam -- and, with limited surfaces on which to use portals, a fun inversion of a lot of the levels that preceded it.

Full replay of Fallout 3 including all DLC. Shorter than I recall and some of the caves were very "Morrowind" which I don't think I noticed at the time, but had a great time. This was on the Steam Deck, a few crashes but nothing too problematic.
DLC was OK, MQ I enjoyed and the other quests were great. Had 10 mins in Fallout 4 as I planned to go straight in but think I need a FO break.

Besides, if you go straight from 3 to 4 you're skipping the best one.

I wondered if I'd get that comment, but don't fully agree. Always thought of FONV as a bit of a side quest, albeit a very entertaining side quest.

kborom wrote:

Full replay of Fallout 3 including all DLC. Shorter than I recall...

How long did it take you? Presumably you did not lose too much time due to inexperience, as I will, one day, when I proper try it...

el_dino wrote:
kborom wrote:

Full replay of Fallout 3 including all DLC. Shorter than I recall...

How long did it take you? Presumably you did not lose too much time due to inexperience, as I will, one day, when I proper try it...

I tend to do a reasonable amount of exploring and have played the game a few times before but I think around 50 hours for MQ/DLC for me.

Finished the final boss on Dave the Diver yesterday, but I'm definitely not done with that game. Gotta get those last few MerinCa cards and grow my sushi empire!

Trachalio wrote:

Finished the final boss on Dave the Diver yesterday, but I'm definitely not done with that game. Gotta get those last few MerinCa cards and grow my sushi empire!

Same here!

Not a major accomplishment but finished up Star Wars: Tales from the Galaxy and just really enjoyed it. It's a VR FPS that really puts you in the Star Wars universe. You'll come across classic characters like C-3PO, R2, Yoda, and Darth Vader. During side missions you'll get to use the force, a lightsaber, and even play as IG-88. But you'll generally be working with new characters introduced in the game, which fit pretty well in the Star Wars universe, although a bit more on the less serious side of things.

The FPS level design and enemy AI would not work in a 2D game as both are simplistic. But in VR it works just fine. You get to fight with some classic Star Wars blasters and combat can get hectic when being attacked from above, in front, and the sides. I even died several times.

The DLC is a must for this as it actually contains a fair bit of content including a very satisfying finale where your unlikely band of heroes come together to perform a rescue mission and stop the Empires plan. They really nailed the Star Wars vibe there. And topped it off with a pretty satisfying victory party.

I'm guessing the game probably didn't sell enough to warrant a sequel, but it really showed Star Wars FPS in VR is a perfect mix.

I hate to say it but I think I'm done with Age of Wonders 4.

It's such a well-made game, and I want to like it, but it's just missing that...that something to grab me. It doesn't help that there are so many other games both installed and in the pile that I can't wait to play, and with Age of Wonders 4 I only feel an obligation to play. I don't get it, but I just looked at it on my Steam list and I said "look it's not you it's me, but we both know this isn't working out for us. Maybe in the future we can try again, but right now I'm in this relationship with HELLDIVERS 2 and Baldur's Gate 3 and my new Rogue Trader fling. It's not fair to you to keep you hanging here."

Well I didn't actually say that, but my thoughts kind of went along unformed in that general direction while I uninstalled it.

Let me be very clear: AoW4 is a good game. And I see why people like it. It has wonderful graphics, music, production quality, and endless replayability. The game deserves more attention than I gave it, but something just seems by the numbers about AoW4 for me. I don't know what it is, but the fact that I don't know what it is kind of describes my issue.

The good games, and especially the great games, have that "thing". That secret sauce, that indescribable spirit that just captures your imagination. Some games are able to capture a larger number of people than others, but it is always a fickle beauty. So for me, AoW4 is that pretty high school cheerleader who's smart and friendly that for some reason you dumped for the punk rock girl who does MMA. As well put together as AoW4 is, there's something very vanilla about the gameplay that never really intrigued me. I enjoyed my time more or less with it, but I never thought about the game in my off time or got revved up to jump back in the next day. I easily thought "Hell yeah!" for the titles listed above whenever I have the opportunity to play them.

Up next, really digging all 3 titles above, but Warhammer 40K: Rogue Trader is truly grabbing me the most right now. As much as I love my 40K shooters and RTS titles, we need more true RPG titles in the 40K universe!

I have finished every single level in Super Mario Wonder. The only thing that remains to be done is getting a wonderful on the absolute last goal post. I'll get there soon, though.

This is the most fun I've had with a 2D Mario game since the SNES, and depending on how you classify Super Mario World: Yoshi's Island, that streak goes back to Super Mario World. Which was also the last Mario game of any type I completed 100%. Definitely top 3 games this year so far. Maybe #1 or 2.

I replayed Assassin's Creed Origins, only the main story, and I used the level 45 boost intended to help people get right into the Curse of the Pharaohs DLC. Lots of fun, and I was surprised how quickly it went sticking just to the main story. 29 hours! If I hadn't used the level boost, I probably would have needed to pick up a few of the side quests. That wouldn't have been a problem because most of the Origins side quests are entertaining and well written. But optimizing for time I had to force myself to ignore them.

After getting through this so quickly, I'm reconsidering streaming a full series playthrough. I may have time to do it sticking only to the main quests. If I was a viewer, that'd make it a little less interesting to me, but in the interest of getting through all 13 games in a reasonable amount of time... worth it.

Budo wrote:

...So for me, AoW4 is that pretty high school cheerleader who's smart and friendly that for some reason you dumped for the punk rock girl who does MMA.

You and I had very different high school experiences.

Lol that was great.

Finished Tales of Kenzera: Zau this morning. I would highly recommend it. If you're not familiar, it's a relatively short (10 hour) platformer, kind of a Metroidvania. It's also got much more plot than these sorts of games often do. The premise is that the main character, Zuberi, is grieving the death of his father -- and Zuberi's father, before he passed, wrote a book about a shaman (Zau) who bargained with death to try to bring back his father. So, the story is pretty much told as if the game you are playing is the story that Zuberi is reading.

The game was made by a studio founded by Abubakir Salim, who voiced Bayek in Assassin's Creed Origins. Apparently, the game's story is inspired by Salim's grief at his own father's passing, and it really shows that this is a labor of love. The game is beautiful, the controls are tight, the movement, platforming, and combat feels great. There is a lot of narrative overlap between the story, the aesthetic, and gameplay mechanics -- they all compliment each other very well. And the music! I could rave about the music so much, it was a brilliant and beautiful, and just pulled me right in.

I have to say it's also really cool to see a game like this, drawing inspiration from African culture. The "present day" part of the story is set in a city with an Afrofuturist vibe; the "past" story is, as I understand, inspired by Bantu folklore and mythology.

Above, I said it was "kind of" a metroidvania. I don't want to gatekeep a genre or anything, but here's what I mean. The platforming, movement, combat, mechanics, and so on are all very much fit the genre. But using new abilities to backtrack and explore is another one, and that's not really a focus here. For as much as maps appear to be winding, they are actually very linear. There's only limited backtracking needed: all Act I collectibles can be gained through Act I abilities, and so on. And I think this was a good decision because the world's big, but kind of empty, for three reasons: (1) aesthetically, Zau's exploring a broken world, so I think this was an intentional choice; (2) the game features far fewer secrets or collectibles than you'd find in a Metroid or Castlevania; and (3) combat primarily focuses on fighting designed encounters in specific rooms, so there aren't a lot of monsters just roaming around. All that's to say, exploring was fun as I went, but if the game had featured Metroid-level exploring, the empty world would have made that hunt pretty tedious.

It's "free" if you subscribe to PS+ Extra, too!

Saturday, I finished playing Luigi's Mansion 3 co-op with my sister. Definitely recommend playing with someone else since it was fun solving puzzles together. It did get a bit repetitive (looking at you polter kitty sections) but overall, I thought it was a nice improvement over the second game.

I still need to play the first one sometime. I got it back in the day on gamecube but it always froze after the first cut scene. We exchanged it at the store for a new copy and had the same problem so it was our system but it never had any problems with any other games. So strange. Anyways, I am eyeing Unravel 2 for our next switch co op game.

Finished Hexcells the day after I bought it.

Clean, very clean and smart Nonogram & Minesweeper puzzle game. A bit short, but well worth the price. Going in again to solve everything without one mistake

Keep going -- Hexcells 2 is better and Hexcells Infinite is even better than that.

Pollimines is another good follow-on from Hexcells.

Squarecells is from the Hexcells dev and is more goodness in the same vein.

Tametsi is where you go after you've beaten all of them. Proper hard puzzles.

I've also recently picked up Liquidium which is good too, adds more rules on top of the basic Nonogram puzzle.

After watching credits roll on Cuphead a few weeks back, I took a short break and then jumped back into Cuphead: Delicious Last Course. I watched credits roll on that yesterday as well. I won't say that I LOVE Cuphead because I don't plan to go back and play it ever again, but the amount of satisfaction I got from beating each individual boss is a pretty huge rush.

What I do love is how each boss seems completely impossible to defeat at the beginning. By trial and error, you eventually start chipping away at each stage until you master (or at least barely survive) them is pretty damn satisfying.

Garth wrote:

After watching credits roll on Cuphead a few weeks back, I took a short break and then jumped back into Cuphead: Delicious Last Course. I watched credits roll on that yesterday as well. I won't say that I LOVE Cuphead because I don't plan to go back and play it ever again, but the amount of satisfaction I got from beating each individual boss is a pretty huge rush.

What I do love is how each boss seems completely impossible to defeat at the beginning. By trial and error, you eventually start chipping away at each stage until you master (or at least barely survive) them is pretty damn satisfying.

Congrats! That's a tough game all around.

I finished The Walking Dead: The Final Season, and cried more than I’ve ever cried in any video game. Probably any media ever.

Without going into spoilers, it says right in the title that this is the last game they’ll ever make for this series, so going into it knowing that this would be my last chance to spend time with Clementine was… heartbreaking. I’ve played these games off and on for over 10 years now, and her growing up has echoed the growth of my own children. Maybe that’s why it cut me so deep emotionally.

Anyway, the game itself was well made and hit the right notes, even if it wasn’t blow-your-socks-off incredible. But I don’t think it was ever meant to be some big crazy thing. It was just a nice respectful send off to one of gaming’s most beloved franchises and characters. I enjoyed it.

jamos5 wrote:

I finished The Walking Dead: The Final Season, and cried more than I’ve ever cried in any video game. Probably any media ever.

Without going into spoilers, it says right in the title that this is the last game they’ll ever make for this series, so going into it knowing that this would be my last chance to spend time with Clementine was… heartbreaking. I’ve played these games off and on for over 10 years now, and her growing up has echoed the growth of my own children. Maybe that’s why it cut me so deep emotionally.

Anyway, the game itself was well made and hit the right notes, even if it wasn’t blow-your-socks-off incredible. But I don’t think it was ever meant to be some big crazy thing. It was just a nice respectful send off to one of gaming’s most beloved franchises and characters. I enjoyed it.

Yeah, that series hit hard, especially the first and last episodes. One of the few times I shed tears watching or playing a game/film.

Finished Duck Detective: The Secret Salami.

Overall, I'm pretty unhappy with it. It's very short (90-120 minutes from start to finish), and while the presentation oozes charm from every pore, the nuts'n'bolts detectorin' is lame. Very much a case of click on everything and talk to everyone multiple times (each time you get a new bit of info, off you go to do the rounds again), no skill or nuance required other than being thorough.

Then beyond that, I felt like the solutions to the puzzles were obtuse and required more leaps of logic than the game gave to me. Ended up looking up the final answers just to be done with it.

Gosh looks like I haven't played TWD game since 2013... the very first season. I have season 2 and Michonne but not sure I ever played them... definitely didn't finish. Kinda quit the show somewhere in there and didn't look back.

But maybe I should find the time....

Stele wrote:

Gosh looks like I haven't played TWD game since 2013... the very first season. I have season 2 and Michonne but not sure I ever played them... definitely didn't finish. Kinda quit the show somewhere in there and didn't look back.

But maybe I should find the time....

To be fair, although the first season is pure genius, the other ones can vary wildly in terms of quality. Thankfully episodes are always on the short side, so it’s pretty easy to push through the lesser stuff for the good. I’d recommend at least plucking away at it.

jamos5 wrote:
Stele wrote:

Gosh looks like I haven't played TWD game since 2013... the very first season. I have season 2 and Michonne but not sure I ever played them... definitely didn't finish. Kinda quit the show somewhere in there and didn't look back.

But maybe I should find the time....

To be fair, although the first season is pure genius, the other ones can vary wildly in terms of quality. Thankfully episodes are always on the short side, so it’s pretty easy to push through the lesser stuff for the good. I’d recommend at least plucking away at it.

I thought it was just as good all the way through. All 5 episodes had interesting characters and storylines. I didn't like the Michonne spin off though.

Again, not a major accomplishment but finished Resident Evil 4 VR on Quest. I've already finished this on the Gamecube, and then the one of the Playstations, and then the PC, and then the remake on the PC. But was up for one more time in a totally new way of experiencing it in VR. It was pretty damn neat even though I was so familiar with it.

The game is a lot easier in VR when shooting enemies. With the laser sight you can almost not miss. I had a 87% hit rate by the end of the game. Also you can easily shoot at enemies above and below you the few times that happens.

There are no storage boxes in the game so can only take what you can carry. So you're selling back any weapons you are not using. But by 3/4ths of the game I had an XL carrying case and could hold 4 guns without too much issue.

Ashley is creepy as hell. She follows you at about a foot away. So anytime you turn around fully she's right in your face. Or at least chest height. And kinda a funny thing with her is if she is above there's an animation of her covering her skirt if you look up. They actually had to put that in there.

No extra Ada missions with the game. But you get the Merceries stuff which is fun in VR.

Graphics are a bit dated with some low-resolution textures. But was able to fix that by installing the Quest Game Optimizer which upped the resolution significantly and playing smoothly at 90hz. But this is not the remake version of the game the PSVR2 got. So that was kind of disappointing. If they ever release that on Quest or PCVR I'll probably play this through yet again.

Animal Well has been completed in the last 15 mins. A gem of a game but one that has a tough barrier of entry to initially get through.

A 2D exploration metroidvania without any combat that has a truly bespoke graphic style that is hard to even describe past a sort of retro sprite style that looks unlike anything else out there. The engine was built by its sole creator Billy Basso.

The best advice I can give about Animal Well is just to explore in any direction & push as far as you can until you start to find the items that will enable you to solve puzzles or get to new areas. You don't need to worry about going too far off course because the game wants you to. If you get to a hard block going east, just go north, south or west. You'll eventually start to accumulate the different items to be found in the various parts of the map.

The puzzles & game design really are some the games strong points, based on interacting with the different animals, how to reach certain buttons or levers. You'll combine the use of items & feel smart as hell for having worked out the solution to tricky block or traversal puzzles.

It has a little bit of that Outer Wilds knowledge factor that once you know what a certain animal responds to or how bits of the environment react to the unique items in your inventory then your seeing things in a clearer manner.

There are secrets buried everywhere, I got quite a lot of the chests hidden throughout the map but there is some that your wondering how in the world do I get up there even with seemingly every item collected & at your disposal.

One thing you should make sure you do it mark the map (I think you get that somewhat early on as an unlockable thing in game). There will be rooms you can't do anything in without a certain item that you'll want to come back to & the map is huge so put a specific marker down to make sure you come back to that spot.

I did have to resort to a guide a few times otherwise I would have lost steam. The biggest drawback but also strength of Animal Well is that your told absolutely nothing, it's upto you to figure out how things operate, there's no markers, barely any hints of where to go next. This eventually lead to a scenario where I was scanning the map look for any little gaps that suggested I should go back to this area to see if there's some passage way that I missed to get to a new part of the map.

You start to question 'am I just not figuring out this puzzle or am I missing an item to solve it' which can be a bit frustrating. It's worth getting past this headache though & you can just look up a walkthrough if need be.

Animal Well is a special game, don't even watch a trailer just discover things in game for the first time yourself. I land on it being very good because of how easy it can be to just get lost & not know where to go next. The world is compelling, the platforming is surprisingly tight, the interactions, multiple uses for certain items, it's just filled with creativity.

Bravo Billy Basso!